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Silent killer: case report of acute gastrostomy tube erosion.

Chang AD, Thota D, Liang JM - West J Emerg Med (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Naval Medical Center San Diego, Department of Emergency Medicine, San Diego, California.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sagittal section showing erosion into bowel wall (circle).
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f2-wjem-16-318: Sagittal section showing erosion into bowel wall (circle).

Mentions: An 87-year-old male with multiple medical problems and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement presented to the emergency department for recurrent dysphagia, constipation, and concern for stool appearing in his PEG tube. The patient denied PEG tube complications over the past year. The patient’s vitals were within normal limits, and the exam was notable for a soft, non-tender, non-distended abdomen without masses or pain, with fecal contents observed in the PEG tube. Lab studies were unremarkable, and acute abdominal series films showed no evidence of obstruction or free air. A chest tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast was performed, showing the gastrostomy tube linking the anterior aspect of the middle stomach with a portion within the transverse colon (Figures 1 and 2). The patient was admitted to the general surgery service for removal of the migrated PEG tube that eroded into the viscera.


Silent killer: case report of acute gastrostomy tube erosion.

Chang AD, Thota D, Liang JM - West J Emerg Med (2015)

Sagittal section showing erosion into bowel wall (circle).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4380388&req=5

f2-wjem-16-318: Sagittal section showing erosion into bowel wall (circle).
Mentions: An 87-year-old male with multiple medical problems and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement presented to the emergency department for recurrent dysphagia, constipation, and concern for stool appearing in his PEG tube. The patient denied PEG tube complications over the past year. The patient’s vitals were within normal limits, and the exam was notable for a soft, non-tender, non-distended abdomen without masses or pain, with fecal contents observed in the PEG tube. Lab studies were unremarkable, and acute abdominal series films showed no evidence of obstruction or free air. A chest tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast was performed, showing the gastrostomy tube linking the anterior aspect of the middle stomach with a portion within the transverse colon (Figures 1 and 2). The patient was admitted to the general surgery service for removal of the migrated PEG tube that eroded into the viscera.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Naval Medical Center San Diego, Department of Emergency Medicine, San Diego, California.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus