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Jaguar attack on a child: case report and literature review.

Iserson KV, Francis AM - West J Emerg Med (2015)

Bottom Line: When they do, they are often fatal.We describe a jaguar attack on a three-year-old girl near her home deep in a remote area of the Guyanese jungle.We review jaguar anatomy, environmental status, hunting and killing behaviors, and discuss optimal medical management, given the resource-limited treatment environment of this international emergency medicine case.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Arizona, Department of Emergency Medicine, Tucson, Arizona ; Georgetown Public Hospital (GPHC), Department of Emergency Medicine, Georgetown, Guyana.

ABSTRACT
Jaguar attacks on humans rarely occur in the wild. When they do, they are often fatal. We describe a jaguar attack on a three-year-old girl near her home deep in a remote area of the Guyanese jungle. The patient had a complex but, relatively, rapid transport to a medical treatment facility for her life-threatening injuries. The child, who suffered typical jaguar-inflicted injury patterns and survived, is highlighted. We review jaguar anatomy, environmental status, hunting and killing behaviors, and discuss optimal medical management, given the resource-limited treatment environment of this international emergency medicine case.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A, Jaguar (used by permission; Panthera onca, jaguar © MarcusObal, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported. Available at: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/species-of-the-day/biodiversity/endangered-species/panthera-onca/biology/index.html. Accessed 6 July 2014.)B, Jaguar Skull (Public domain. Originally from Elliot DG. The land and sea mammals of Middle America and the West Indies. Chicago:Field Colombian Museum, 1904. Available at: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jaguarskull.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Jaguarskull.jpg. Accessed 6 July 2014.)
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f1-wjem-16-303: A, Jaguar (used by permission; Panthera onca, jaguar © MarcusObal, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported. Available at: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/species-of-the-day/biodiversity/endangered-species/panthera-onca/biology/index.html. Accessed 6 July 2014.)B, Jaguar Skull (Public domain. Originally from Elliot DG. The land and sea mammals of Middle America and the West Indies. Chicago:Field Colombian Museum, 1904. Available at: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jaguarskull.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Jaguarskull.jpg. Accessed 6 July 2014.)

Mentions: Jaguars (Panthera onca) are the third largest felid (cat) after the tiger and the lion (Figures 1A and 1B). They exist only in the Western Hemisphere, with the Amazon regions of South America, particularly Brazil, having the highest concentration. An apex predator (no natural enemies), jaguar survival is threatened only when humans intentionally kill them or decrease their ability to feed by destroying or encroaching on their habitat. In some areas, their fear of humans has decreased due to ecotourism and intentional feeding. As in the following case of an unprovoked attack on a three-year-old Amerindian girl in Guyana, the cats may be more prone to attack humans as prey.


Jaguar attack on a child: case report and literature review.

Iserson KV, Francis AM - West J Emerg Med (2015)

A, Jaguar (used by permission; Panthera onca, jaguar © MarcusObal, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported. Available at: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/species-of-the-day/biodiversity/endangered-species/panthera-onca/biology/index.html. Accessed 6 July 2014.)B, Jaguar Skull (Public domain. Originally from Elliot DG. The land and sea mammals of Middle America and the West Indies. Chicago:Field Colombian Museum, 1904. Available at: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jaguarskull.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Jaguarskull.jpg. Accessed 6 July 2014.)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4380383&req=5

f1-wjem-16-303: A, Jaguar (used by permission; Panthera onca, jaguar © MarcusObal, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported. Available at: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/species-of-the-day/biodiversity/endangered-species/panthera-onca/biology/index.html. Accessed 6 July 2014.)B, Jaguar Skull (Public domain. Originally from Elliot DG. The land and sea mammals of Middle America and the West Indies. Chicago:Field Colombian Museum, 1904. Available at: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jaguarskull.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Jaguarskull.jpg. Accessed 6 July 2014.)
Mentions: Jaguars (Panthera onca) are the third largest felid (cat) after the tiger and the lion (Figures 1A and 1B). They exist only in the Western Hemisphere, with the Amazon regions of South America, particularly Brazil, having the highest concentration. An apex predator (no natural enemies), jaguar survival is threatened only when humans intentionally kill them or decrease their ability to feed by destroying or encroaching on their habitat. In some areas, their fear of humans has decreased due to ecotourism and intentional feeding. As in the following case of an unprovoked attack on a three-year-old Amerindian girl in Guyana, the cats may be more prone to attack humans as prey.

Bottom Line: When they do, they are often fatal.We describe a jaguar attack on a three-year-old girl near her home deep in a remote area of the Guyanese jungle.We review jaguar anatomy, environmental status, hunting and killing behaviors, and discuss optimal medical management, given the resource-limited treatment environment of this international emergency medicine case.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Arizona, Department of Emergency Medicine, Tucson, Arizona ; Georgetown Public Hospital (GPHC), Department of Emergency Medicine, Georgetown, Guyana.

ABSTRACT
Jaguar attacks on humans rarely occur in the wild. When they do, they are often fatal. We describe a jaguar attack on a three-year-old girl near her home deep in a remote area of the Guyanese jungle. The patient had a complex but, relatively, rapid transport to a medical treatment facility for her life-threatening injuries. The child, who suffered typical jaguar-inflicted injury patterns and survived, is highlighted. We review jaguar anatomy, environmental status, hunting and killing behaviors, and discuss optimal medical management, given the resource-limited treatment environment of this international emergency medicine case.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus