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Identify-isolate-inform: a tool for initial detection and management of measles patients in the emergency department.

Koenig KL, Alassaf W, Burns MJ - West J Emerg Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Measles typically presents with a prodrome of high fever, and cough/coryza/conjunctivitis, sometimes accompanied by the pathognomonic Koplik spots.Two to four days later, an erythematous maculopapular rash begins on the face and spreads down the body.Suspect patients must be immediately isolated with airborne precautions while awaiting laboratory confirmation of disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of California, Irvine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Orange, California.

ABSTRACT
Measles (rubeola) is a highly contagious airborne disease that was declared eliminated in the U.S. in the year 2000. Only sporadic U.S. cases and minor outbreaks occurred until the larger outbreak beginning in 2014 that has become a public health emergency. The "Identify-Isolate-Inform" tool will assist emergency physicians to be better prepared to detect and manage measles patients presenting to the emergency department. Measles typically presents with a prodrome of high fever, and cough/coryza/conjunctivitis, sometimes accompanied by the pathognomonic Koplik spots. Two to four days later, an erythematous maculopapular rash begins on the face and spreads down the body. Suspect patients must be immediately isolated with airborne precautions while awaiting laboratory confirmation of disease. Emergency physicians must rapidly inform the local public health department and hospital infection control personnel of suspected measles cases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Nonpurulent conjunctivitis and facial rash of measles one day after rash began. Photo used with permission of Michael J. Burns, MD.
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f1-wjem-16-212: Nonpurulent conjunctivitis and facial rash of measles one day after rash began. Photo used with permission of Michael J. Burns, MD.

Mentions: Measles classically presents with a high fever (often >104°F [40°C]), generally of 4–7 days in duration. This initial sign occurs after an incubation period of 1–2 weeks following exposure (average 10–12 days). During this prodromal phase, a classic triad of cough, coryza and conjunctivitis (the “3 Cs”) is often present.5 Patients may have photophobia. The eyes have a characteristic appearance, typically showing erythema of the palpebral conjunctiva with nonpurulent discharge (Figure 1) and sometimes periorbital edema. Patients may also report malaise, myalgias, anorexia, and diarrhea. Adults often develop transient hepatitis.6


Identify-isolate-inform: a tool for initial detection and management of measles patients in the emergency department.

Koenig KL, Alassaf W, Burns MJ - West J Emerg Med (2015)

Nonpurulent conjunctivitis and facial rash of measles one day after rash began. Photo used with permission of Michael J. Burns, MD.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4380368&req=5

f1-wjem-16-212: Nonpurulent conjunctivitis and facial rash of measles one day after rash began. Photo used with permission of Michael J. Burns, MD.
Mentions: Measles classically presents with a high fever (often >104°F [40°C]), generally of 4–7 days in duration. This initial sign occurs after an incubation period of 1–2 weeks following exposure (average 10–12 days). During this prodromal phase, a classic triad of cough, coryza and conjunctivitis (the “3 Cs”) is often present.5 Patients may have photophobia. The eyes have a characteristic appearance, typically showing erythema of the palpebral conjunctiva with nonpurulent discharge (Figure 1) and sometimes periorbital edema. Patients may also report malaise, myalgias, anorexia, and diarrhea. Adults often develop transient hepatitis.6

Bottom Line: Measles typically presents with a prodrome of high fever, and cough/coryza/conjunctivitis, sometimes accompanied by the pathognomonic Koplik spots.Two to four days later, an erythematous maculopapular rash begins on the face and spreads down the body.Suspect patients must be immediately isolated with airborne precautions while awaiting laboratory confirmation of disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of California, Irvine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Orange, California.

ABSTRACT
Measles (rubeola) is a highly contagious airborne disease that was declared eliminated in the U.S. in the year 2000. Only sporadic U.S. cases and minor outbreaks occurred until the larger outbreak beginning in 2014 that has become a public health emergency. The "Identify-Isolate-Inform" tool will assist emergency physicians to be better prepared to detect and manage measles patients presenting to the emergency department. Measles typically presents with a prodrome of high fever, and cough/coryza/conjunctivitis, sometimes accompanied by the pathognomonic Koplik spots. Two to four days later, an erythematous maculopapular rash begins on the face and spreads down the body. Suspect patients must be immediately isolated with airborne precautions while awaiting laboratory confirmation of disease. Emergency physicians must rapidly inform the local public health department and hospital infection control personnel of suspected measles cases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus