Limits...
Comparative phylogeography of Mississippi embayment fishes.

Egge JJ, Hagbo TJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A clade of haplotypes from tributaries in the southern portion of the Mississippi Embayment was consistently recovered in all four species.Divergence times among clades spanned the Pleistocene, Pliocene, and Miocene.Like their highland relatives, a combination of both pre-Pleistocene and Pleistocene era events have driven divergences among Embayment lineages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
The Mississippi Embayment is a prominent physiographic feature of eastern North America consisting of primarily lowland aquatic habitats and a fish fauna that is largely distinct from nearby highland regions. Numerous studies have demonstrated that both pre-Pleistocene and Pleistocene events have had a strong influence on the distributions and relationships of highland fishes in eastern North America. However, the extent to which these same events affected Embayment distributed taxa remains largely unexplored. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative roles of pre-Pleistocene and Pleistocene events in shaping phylogeographic relationships of four stream dwelling fishes in the Mississippi Embayment. Molecular genetic analyses of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome b were performed for three ictalurid catfish species (Noturus miurus, n = 67; Noturus hildebrandi, n = 93, and Noturus phaeus, n = 44) and one minnow species (Cyprinella camura, n = 78), all distributed in tributary streams of the Mississippi Embayment. Phylogenetic relationships and divergence times among haplotypes for each species were estimated using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. Phylogenetic analyses recovered 6 major haplotype clades within N. miurus, 5 within N. hildbrandi, 8 within N. phaeus, and 8 within C. camura. All three Noturus species show a high degree of isolation by drainage, which is less evident in C. camura. A clade of haplotypes from tributaries in the southern portion of the Mississippi Embayment was consistently recovered in all four species. Divergence times among clades spanned the Pleistocene, Pliocene, and Miocene. Novel relationships presented here for C. camura and N. phaeus suggest the potential for cryptic species. Pre-Pleistocene and Pleistocene era sea level fluctuations coincide with some divergence events, but no single event explains any common divergence across all taxa. Like their highland relatives, a combination of both pre-Pleistocene and Pleistocene era events have driven divergences among Embayment lineages.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Maps of the Mississippi Embayment region.A. Map of the eastern U.S. illustrating the location of the Mississippi Embayment relative to the Appalachian, Ozark, and Ouachita Highlands. Dashed line represents approximate extent of the Coastal Plain. Black rectangle inset indicates outline of area highlighted in section B. Data available from the U.S. Geological Survey. B. Map of major river drainages in the Mississippi Embayment region. Abbreviations as follows: AM, Amite River; AR, Arkansas River; BB, Big Black River; BP, Bayou Pierre; BR, Buffalo River, BS, Big Sandy River; CC, Coles Creek; CR, Coldwater River; CU, Cumberland River; FD, Forked Deer River; HR, Homochitto River; HT, Hatchie River; LI, Little River; LR, Loosahatchie River; MO, Missouri River; MR, Mississippi River; OB, Obion River; OR, Ohio River; OU, Ouachita River; PR, Pearl River; LT, Little Tallahatchie; RR, Red River; TR, Tennessee River; WR, Wolf River; WT, West Fork Thompson Creek; YA, Yalobusha River; YZ, Yazoo River; YO, Yocona River. Colored regions correspond with color coding used to designate clades in Figs 3–5.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4380359&req=5

pone.0116719.g001: Maps of the Mississippi Embayment region.A. Map of the eastern U.S. illustrating the location of the Mississippi Embayment relative to the Appalachian, Ozark, and Ouachita Highlands. Dashed line represents approximate extent of the Coastal Plain. Black rectangle inset indicates outline of area highlighted in section B. Data available from the U.S. Geological Survey. B. Map of major river drainages in the Mississippi Embayment region. Abbreviations as follows: AM, Amite River; AR, Arkansas River; BB, Big Black River; BP, Bayou Pierre; BR, Buffalo River, BS, Big Sandy River; CC, Coles Creek; CR, Coldwater River; CU, Cumberland River; FD, Forked Deer River; HR, Homochitto River; HT, Hatchie River; LI, Little River; LR, Loosahatchie River; MO, Missouri River; MR, Mississippi River; OB, Obion River; OR, Ohio River; OU, Ouachita River; PR, Pearl River; LT, Little Tallahatchie; RR, Red River; TR, Tennessee River; WR, Wolf River; WT, West Fork Thompson Creek; YA, Yalobusha River; YZ, Yazoo River; YO, Yocona River. Colored regions correspond with color coding used to designate clades in Figs 3–5.

Mentions: The region encompassing the lower Mississippi River and surrounding lowlands is known as the Mississippi Embayment. The Embayment is an ancient, prominent geomorphological feature of eastern North America. It formed initially as an uplift approximately 95 Ma, but then gradually subsided, separating the once continuous Ouachita-Appalachian mountain range and generating the depressed topography that characterizes the modern day Embayment [13,14,15,16]. The Embayment is effectively an extension of the Coastal Plain, a region characterized largely by lowland rivers that are direct tributaries of the Atlantic Ocean or Gulf of Mexico (Fig 1A). Unlike the rest of the Coastal Plain, most Embayment streams and rivers fall within the Mississippi River drainage. Large rivers with lowland character draining the Ozark and Ouachita highlands dominate the aquatic habitat of the Embayment west of the Mississippi River. In contrast, the eastern side of the Embayment is characterized by a series of small to medium sized rivers and streams that do not drain highland regions, but do contain patches of habitat that have some highland characteristics in their upper reaches (Fig 1B). Some or all of the Embayment was likely influenced by Pleistocene era glacial cycles that correlated with alternating periods of stream aggradation and entrenchment. This process resulted in Embayment streams that were at times more highland in character than they are today [5,17]. Southern tributaries were likely influenced by sea level fluctuations spanning the Miocene, Pliocene, and Pleistocene that periodically resulted in seawater inundation of portions of the Embayment [18].


Comparative phylogeography of Mississippi embayment fishes.

Egge JJ, Hagbo TJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Maps of the Mississippi Embayment region.A. Map of the eastern U.S. illustrating the location of the Mississippi Embayment relative to the Appalachian, Ozark, and Ouachita Highlands. Dashed line represents approximate extent of the Coastal Plain. Black rectangle inset indicates outline of area highlighted in section B. Data available from the U.S. Geological Survey. B. Map of major river drainages in the Mississippi Embayment region. Abbreviations as follows: AM, Amite River; AR, Arkansas River; BB, Big Black River; BP, Bayou Pierre; BR, Buffalo River, BS, Big Sandy River; CC, Coles Creek; CR, Coldwater River; CU, Cumberland River; FD, Forked Deer River; HR, Homochitto River; HT, Hatchie River; LI, Little River; LR, Loosahatchie River; MO, Missouri River; MR, Mississippi River; OB, Obion River; OR, Ohio River; OU, Ouachita River; PR, Pearl River; LT, Little Tallahatchie; RR, Red River; TR, Tennessee River; WR, Wolf River; WT, West Fork Thompson Creek; YA, Yalobusha River; YZ, Yazoo River; YO, Yocona River. Colored regions correspond with color coding used to designate clades in Figs 3–5.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4380359&req=5

pone.0116719.g001: Maps of the Mississippi Embayment region.A. Map of the eastern U.S. illustrating the location of the Mississippi Embayment relative to the Appalachian, Ozark, and Ouachita Highlands. Dashed line represents approximate extent of the Coastal Plain. Black rectangle inset indicates outline of area highlighted in section B. Data available from the U.S. Geological Survey. B. Map of major river drainages in the Mississippi Embayment region. Abbreviations as follows: AM, Amite River; AR, Arkansas River; BB, Big Black River; BP, Bayou Pierre; BR, Buffalo River, BS, Big Sandy River; CC, Coles Creek; CR, Coldwater River; CU, Cumberland River; FD, Forked Deer River; HR, Homochitto River; HT, Hatchie River; LI, Little River; LR, Loosahatchie River; MO, Missouri River; MR, Mississippi River; OB, Obion River; OR, Ohio River; OU, Ouachita River; PR, Pearl River; LT, Little Tallahatchie; RR, Red River; TR, Tennessee River; WR, Wolf River; WT, West Fork Thompson Creek; YA, Yalobusha River; YZ, Yazoo River; YO, Yocona River. Colored regions correspond with color coding used to designate clades in Figs 3–5.
Mentions: The region encompassing the lower Mississippi River and surrounding lowlands is known as the Mississippi Embayment. The Embayment is an ancient, prominent geomorphological feature of eastern North America. It formed initially as an uplift approximately 95 Ma, but then gradually subsided, separating the once continuous Ouachita-Appalachian mountain range and generating the depressed topography that characterizes the modern day Embayment [13,14,15,16]. The Embayment is effectively an extension of the Coastal Plain, a region characterized largely by lowland rivers that are direct tributaries of the Atlantic Ocean or Gulf of Mexico (Fig 1A). Unlike the rest of the Coastal Plain, most Embayment streams and rivers fall within the Mississippi River drainage. Large rivers with lowland character draining the Ozark and Ouachita highlands dominate the aquatic habitat of the Embayment west of the Mississippi River. In contrast, the eastern side of the Embayment is characterized by a series of small to medium sized rivers and streams that do not drain highland regions, but do contain patches of habitat that have some highland characteristics in their upper reaches (Fig 1B). Some or all of the Embayment was likely influenced by Pleistocene era glacial cycles that correlated with alternating periods of stream aggradation and entrenchment. This process resulted in Embayment streams that were at times more highland in character than they are today [5,17]. Southern tributaries were likely influenced by sea level fluctuations spanning the Miocene, Pliocene, and Pleistocene that periodically resulted in seawater inundation of portions of the Embayment [18].

Bottom Line: A clade of haplotypes from tributaries in the southern portion of the Mississippi Embayment was consistently recovered in all four species.Divergence times among clades spanned the Pleistocene, Pliocene, and Miocene.Like their highland relatives, a combination of both pre-Pleistocene and Pleistocene era events have driven divergences among Embayment lineages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
The Mississippi Embayment is a prominent physiographic feature of eastern North America consisting of primarily lowland aquatic habitats and a fish fauna that is largely distinct from nearby highland regions. Numerous studies have demonstrated that both pre-Pleistocene and Pleistocene events have had a strong influence on the distributions and relationships of highland fishes in eastern North America. However, the extent to which these same events affected Embayment distributed taxa remains largely unexplored. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative roles of pre-Pleistocene and Pleistocene events in shaping phylogeographic relationships of four stream dwelling fishes in the Mississippi Embayment. Molecular genetic analyses of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome b were performed for three ictalurid catfish species (Noturus miurus, n = 67; Noturus hildebrandi, n = 93, and Noturus phaeus, n = 44) and one minnow species (Cyprinella camura, n = 78), all distributed in tributary streams of the Mississippi Embayment. Phylogenetic relationships and divergence times among haplotypes for each species were estimated using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. Phylogenetic analyses recovered 6 major haplotype clades within N. miurus, 5 within N. hildbrandi, 8 within N. phaeus, and 8 within C. camura. All three Noturus species show a high degree of isolation by drainage, which is less evident in C. camura. A clade of haplotypes from tributaries in the southern portion of the Mississippi Embayment was consistently recovered in all four species. Divergence times among clades spanned the Pleistocene, Pliocene, and Miocene. Novel relationships presented here for C. camura and N. phaeus suggest the potential for cryptic species. Pre-Pleistocene and Pleistocene era sea level fluctuations coincide with some divergence events, but no single event explains any common divergence across all taxa. Like their highland relatives, a combination of both pre-Pleistocene and Pleistocene era events have driven divergences among Embayment lineages.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus