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Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): a flow-like mental state.

Barratt EL, Davis NJ - PeerJ (2015)

Bottom Line: Data obtained also illustrates temporary improvements in symptoms of depression and chronic pain in those who engage in ASMR.A high prevalence of synaesthesia (5.9%) within the sample suggests a possible link between ASMR and synaesthesia, similar to that of misophonia.Links between number of effective triggers and heightened flow state suggest that flow may be necessary to achieve sensations associated with ASMR.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Swansea University , Swansea , United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) is a previously unstudied sensory phenomenon, in which individuals experience a tingling, static-like sensation across the scalp, back of the neck and at times further areas in response to specific triggering audio and visual stimuli. This sensation is widely reported to be accompanied by feelings of relaxation and well-being. The current study identifies several common triggers used to achieve ASMR, including whispering, personal attention, crisp sounds and slow movements. Data obtained also illustrates temporary improvements in symptoms of depression and chronic pain in those who engage in ASMR. A high prevalence of synaesthesia (5.9%) within the sample suggests a possible link between ASMR and synaesthesia, similar to that of misophonia. Links between number of effective triggers and heightened flow state suggest that flow may be necessary to achieve sensations associated with ASMR.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow and Triggers figure.Relationship between participants’ susceptibility to the flow state (expressed as a sum of the scores on the modified Flow State Scale) and the number of triggers of the ASMR state.
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fig-3: Flow and Triggers figure.Relationship between participants’ susceptibility to the flow state (expressed as a sum of the scores on the modified Flow State Scale) and the number of triggers of the ASMR state.

Mentions: Fifty cases did not have complete data for the flow state questionnaire, so were removed from analysis. We were interested in whether people who experience the flow state more readily also experience the ASMR state more readily. To examine this we took the sum of each participant’s responses on the flow state questionnaire and correlated this with the total number of ASMR triggers each person reported, from the list of commonly-reported triggers (i.e., whispering, crisp sounds, personal attention, repetitive actions, slow movements, smiling, water pouring). We used a non-parametric Spearman’s test, as the trigger data tended to fall into a small number of values. We found a highly significant relationship between flow experience and number of triggers, with greater flow experience being associated with a larger number of triggers [rho = 0.936, p < 0.01]. This relationship is shown in Fig. 3.


Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): a flow-like mental state.

Barratt EL, Davis NJ - PeerJ (2015)

Flow and Triggers figure.Relationship between participants’ susceptibility to the flow state (expressed as a sum of the scores on the modified Flow State Scale) and the number of triggers of the ASMR state.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4380153&req=5

fig-3: Flow and Triggers figure.Relationship between participants’ susceptibility to the flow state (expressed as a sum of the scores on the modified Flow State Scale) and the number of triggers of the ASMR state.
Mentions: Fifty cases did not have complete data for the flow state questionnaire, so were removed from analysis. We were interested in whether people who experience the flow state more readily also experience the ASMR state more readily. To examine this we took the sum of each participant’s responses on the flow state questionnaire and correlated this with the total number of ASMR triggers each person reported, from the list of commonly-reported triggers (i.e., whispering, crisp sounds, personal attention, repetitive actions, slow movements, smiling, water pouring). We used a non-parametric Spearman’s test, as the trigger data tended to fall into a small number of values. We found a highly significant relationship between flow experience and number of triggers, with greater flow experience being associated with a larger number of triggers [rho = 0.936, p < 0.01]. This relationship is shown in Fig. 3.

Bottom Line: Data obtained also illustrates temporary improvements in symptoms of depression and chronic pain in those who engage in ASMR.A high prevalence of synaesthesia (5.9%) within the sample suggests a possible link between ASMR and synaesthesia, similar to that of misophonia.Links between number of effective triggers and heightened flow state suggest that flow may be necessary to achieve sensations associated with ASMR.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Swansea University , Swansea , United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) is a previously unstudied sensory phenomenon, in which individuals experience a tingling, static-like sensation across the scalp, back of the neck and at times further areas in response to specific triggering audio and visual stimuli. This sensation is widely reported to be accompanied by feelings of relaxation and well-being. The current study identifies several common triggers used to achieve ASMR, including whispering, personal attention, crisp sounds and slow movements. Data obtained also illustrates temporary improvements in symptoms of depression and chronic pain in those who engage in ASMR. A high prevalence of synaesthesia (5.9%) within the sample suggests a possible link between ASMR and synaesthesia, similar to that of misophonia. Links between number of effective triggers and heightened flow state suggest that flow may be necessary to achieve sensations associated with ASMR.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus