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Fibrin gel as an injectable biodegradable scaffold and cell carrier for tissue engineering.

Li Y, Meng H, Liu Y, Lee BP - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Bottom Line: Additionally, fibrin gel mimics the natural blood-clotting process and self-assembles into a polymer network.The ability for fibrin to cure in situ has been exploited to develop injectable scaffolds for the repair of damaged cardiac and cartilage tissues.Additionally, fibrin gel has been utilized as a cell carrier to protect cells from the forces during the application and cell delivery processes while enhancing the cell viability and tissue regeneration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA.

ABSTRACT
Due to the increasing needs for organ transplantation and a universal shortage of donated tissues, tissue engineering emerges as a useful approach to engineer functional tissues. Although different synthetic materials have been used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds, they have many limitations such as the biocompatibility concerns, the inability to support cell attachment, and undesirable degradation rate. Fibrin gel, a biopolymeric material, provides numerous advantages over synthetic materials in functioning as a tissue engineering scaffold and a cell carrier. Fibrin gel exhibits excellent biocompatibility, promotes cell attachment, and can degrade in a controllable manner. Additionally, fibrin gel mimics the natural blood-clotting process and self-assembles into a polymer network. The ability for fibrin to cure in situ has been exploited to develop injectable scaffolds for the repair of damaged cardiac and cartilage tissues. Additionally, fibrin gel has been utilized as a cell carrier to protect cells from the forces during the application and cell delivery processes while enhancing the cell viability and tissue regeneration. Here, we review the recent advancement in developing fibrin-based biomaterials for the development of injectable tissue engineering scaffold and cell carriers.

Show MeSH
Alizarin staining for the synthesis of bone mineral at 7, 14, and 21 days. The calcium minerals are stained in red. The mineral concentration was measured by osteogenesis assay and the results are shown in (d). The mineral concentration at day 21 is 10-fold higher than day 7, which demonstrated cells released from microbeads synthesized bone mineral successfully [53].
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fig8: Alizarin staining for the synthesis of bone mineral at 7, 14, and 21 days. The calcium minerals are stained in red. The mineral concentration was measured by osteogenesis assay and the results are shown in (d). The mineral concentration at day 21 is 10-fold higher than day 7, which demonstrated cells released from microbeads synthesized bone mineral successfully [53].

Mentions: The use of fibrin-based microbeads for stem cell encapsulation and as delivery vehicle along with injectable scaffolds has demonstrated promise in promoting bone regeneration. Zhou and Xu [53] incorporated human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into alginate-fibrin microbeads and added these microbeads to an injectable scaffold. The alginate-fibrin microbeads degraded at day 4 and released the encapsulated stem cells into the scaffold. The released cells showed healthy polygonal morphology and exhibited excellent cell viability (Figure 7). Alizarin staining confirmed the synthesis of bone minerals (Figure 8). Similarly, microbeads-encapsulated stem cells exhibited enhanced cell viability and myogenic differentiation capability for muscle tissue engineering [54]. After 16 days of culture, the percentage of live cells in the microbeads containing scaffold reached 91% and was significantly higher when compared to direct encapsulation of the cells into the construct without the microbeads (cell viability of 81%). The live cell density in the construct with microbeads was also 1.6-fold higher than those without microbeads.


Fibrin gel as an injectable biodegradable scaffold and cell carrier for tissue engineering.

Li Y, Meng H, Liu Y, Lee BP - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Alizarin staining for the synthesis of bone mineral at 7, 14, and 21 days. The calcium minerals are stained in red. The mineral concentration was measured by osteogenesis assay and the results are shown in (d). The mineral concentration at day 21 is 10-fold higher than day 7, which demonstrated cells released from microbeads synthesized bone mineral successfully [53].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4380102&req=5

fig8: Alizarin staining for the synthesis of bone mineral at 7, 14, and 21 days. The calcium minerals are stained in red. The mineral concentration was measured by osteogenesis assay and the results are shown in (d). The mineral concentration at day 21 is 10-fold higher than day 7, which demonstrated cells released from microbeads synthesized bone mineral successfully [53].
Mentions: The use of fibrin-based microbeads for stem cell encapsulation and as delivery vehicle along with injectable scaffolds has demonstrated promise in promoting bone regeneration. Zhou and Xu [53] incorporated human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into alginate-fibrin microbeads and added these microbeads to an injectable scaffold. The alginate-fibrin microbeads degraded at day 4 and released the encapsulated stem cells into the scaffold. The released cells showed healthy polygonal morphology and exhibited excellent cell viability (Figure 7). Alizarin staining confirmed the synthesis of bone minerals (Figure 8). Similarly, microbeads-encapsulated stem cells exhibited enhanced cell viability and myogenic differentiation capability for muscle tissue engineering [54]. After 16 days of culture, the percentage of live cells in the microbeads containing scaffold reached 91% and was significantly higher when compared to direct encapsulation of the cells into the construct without the microbeads (cell viability of 81%). The live cell density in the construct with microbeads was also 1.6-fold higher than those without microbeads.

Bottom Line: Additionally, fibrin gel mimics the natural blood-clotting process and self-assembles into a polymer network.The ability for fibrin to cure in situ has been exploited to develop injectable scaffolds for the repair of damaged cardiac and cartilage tissues.Additionally, fibrin gel has been utilized as a cell carrier to protect cells from the forces during the application and cell delivery processes while enhancing the cell viability and tissue regeneration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA.

ABSTRACT
Due to the increasing needs for organ transplantation and a universal shortage of donated tissues, tissue engineering emerges as a useful approach to engineer functional tissues. Although different synthetic materials have been used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds, they have many limitations such as the biocompatibility concerns, the inability to support cell attachment, and undesirable degradation rate. Fibrin gel, a biopolymeric material, provides numerous advantages over synthetic materials in functioning as a tissue engineering scaffold and a cell carrier. Fibrin gel exhibits excellent biocompatibility, promotes cell attachment, and can degrade in a controllable manner. Additionally, fibrin gel mimics the natural blood-clotting process and self-assembles into a polymer network. The ability for fibrin to cure in situ has been exploited to develop injectable scaffolds for the repair of damaged cardiac and cartilage tissues. Additionally, fibrin gel has been utilized as a cell carrier to protect cells from the forces during the application and cell delivery processes while enhancing the cell viability and tissue regeneration. Here, we review the recent advancement in developing fibrin-based biomaterials for the development of injectable tissue engineering scaffold and cell carriers.

Show MeSH