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The neuroanatomical correlates of training-related perceptuo-reflex uncoupling in dancers.

Nigmatullina Y, Hellyer PJ, Nachev P, Sharp DJ, Seemungal BM - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

Bottom Line: Adaptation to repeated whole-body rotations, for example, ballet training, is known to reduce vestibular responses.Voxel-based morphometry showed a selective gray matter (GM) reduction in dancers' vestibular cerebellum correlating with ballet experience.Dancers' vestibular cerebellar GM density reduction was related to shorter perceptual responses (i.e. positively correlated) but longer VOR duration (negatively correlated).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuro-Otology Unit, Division of Brain Sciences, Imperial College London, London W6 8RP, UK.

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Results of psychophysical assessment. (A) Dancers showed reduced ocular motor and perceptual TCs when compared with the control group. Data marked ** is significant at P < 0.01; data marked * is significant at P < 0.05. (B) Controls, but not dancers, showed a significant correlation between ocular motor and perceptual TCs.
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BHT266F2: Results of psychophysical assessment. (A) Dancers showed reduced ocular motor and perceptual TCs when compared with the control group. Data marked ** is significant at P < 0.01; data marked * is significant at P < 0.05. (B) Controls, but not dancers, showed a significant correlation between ocular motor and perceptual TCs.

Mentions: Ocular motor and perceptual responses were obtained from pre- and postchair rotations. There were no significant differences between leftward and rightward accelerations, and so they were combined (P > 0.05, F = 1.32, df = 1, factor: Direction of rotation, repeated-measures analysis of variance). Ocular motor TCs ranged from 9.52 to 15.8 s in dancers (mean = 11.7 s, SD = 1.78) and from 11.6 to 18.8 s in controls (mean = 14.9 s, SD = 1.87). Perceptual TCs ranged from 3.1 to 11 s in dancers (mean = 7.24 s, SD = 2.17) and from 5 to 14.5 s in controls (mean = 8.89, SD = 2.68). Dancers had significantly shorter ocular motor (t = −5.83, P < 0.001) and perceptual TC (t = −2.36, P < 0.05) than controls (Fig. 2A). Ocular motor and perceptual TCs were significantly correlated for controls (Fig. 2B; r = 0.46, P < 0.05) but not for dancers (Fig. 2B; r = 0.11, P > 0.05), demonstrating that, at the behavioral level, the normal association between reflex (VOR) and perception (Okada et al. 1999) seen in controls is lost in dancers. The gain in the VOR, calculated as eye velocity divided by chair velocity (90°/s), was not significantly different between the 2 groups (P > 0.05, t-test), with a mean gain of 0.51 (SD = 0.17) for dancers and 0.55 (SD = 0.13) for controls.Figure 2.


The neuroanatomical correlates of training-related perceptuo-reflex uncoupling in dancers.

Nigmatullina Y, Hellyer PJ, Nachev P, Sharp DJ, Seemungal BM - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

Results of psychophysical assessment. (A) Dancers showed reduced ocular motor and perceptual TCs when compared with the control group. Data marked ** is significant at P < 0.01; data marked * is significant at P < 0.05. (B) Controls, but not dancers, showed a significant correlation between ocular motor and perceptual TCs.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4380084&req=5

BHT266F2: Results of psychophysical assessment. (A) Dancers showed reduced ocular motor and perceptual TCs when compared with the control group. Data marked ** is significant at P < 0.01; data marked * is significant at P < 0.05. (B) Controls, but not dancers, showed a significant correlation between ocular motor and perceptual TCs.
Mentions: Ocular motor and perceptual responses were obtained from pre- and postchair rotations. There were no significant differences between leftward and rightward accelerations, and so they were combined (P > 0.05, F = 1.32, df = 1, factor: Direction of rotation, repeated-measures analysis of variance). Ocular motor TCs ranged from 9.52 to 15.8 s in dancers (mean = 11.7 s, SD = 1.78) and from 11.6 to 18.8 s in controls (mean = 14.9 s, SD = 1.87). Perceptual TCs ranged from 3.1 to 11 s in dancers (mean = 7.24 s, SD = 2.17) and from 5 to 14.5 s in controls (mean = 8.89, SD = 2.68). Dancers had significantly shorter ocular motor (t = −5.83, P < 0.001) and perceptual TC (t = −2.36, P < 0.05) than controls (Fig. 2A). Ocular motor and perceptual TCs were significantly correlated for controls (Fig. 2B; r = 0.46, P < 0.05) but not for dancers (Fig. 2B; r = 0.11, P > 0.05), demonstrating that, at the behavioral level, the normal association between reflex (VOR) and perception (Okada et al. 1999) seen in controls is lost in dancers. The gain in the VOR, calculated as eye velocity divided by chair velocity (90°/s), was not significantly different between the 2 groups (P > 0.05, t-test), with a mean gain of 0.51 (SD = 0.17) for dancers and 0.55 (SD = 0.13) for controls.Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Adaptation to repeated whole-body rotations, for example, ballet training, is known to reduce vestibular responses.Voxel-based morphometry showed a selective gray matter (GM) reduction in dancers' vestibular cerebellum correlating with ballet experience.Dancers' vestibular cerebellar GM density reduction was related to shorter perceptual responses (i.e. positively correlated) but longer VOR duration (negatively correlated).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuro-Otology Unit, Division of Brain Sciences, Imperial College London, London W6 8RP, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus