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Whole-thorax irradiation induces hypoxic respiratory failure, pleural effusions and cardiac remodeling.

Medhora M, Gao F, Glisch C, Narayanan J, Sharma A, Harmann LM, Lawlor MW, Snyder LA, Fish BL, Down JD, Moulder JE, Strande JL, Jacobs ER - J. Radiat. Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: Lethal irradiation to rat lungs leads to hypoxia with infiltration of immune cells, edema and pleural effusion.These changes may contribute to pulmonary vascular and parenchymal injury that result in secondary changes in heart structure and function.We report that conditions resembling congestive heart failure contribute to death during radiation pneumonitis, which indicates new targets for therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701, Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA Cardiovascular Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701, Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701, Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA Research Service, Department of Veteran's Affairs, Clement J. Zablocki VA Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA medhoram@mcw.edu.

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Radiation-induced increase in breathing rate. Breaths per minute (Y-axis) are presented as means with standard deviations. Irradiated rats (15 Gy) had higher breathing rate than unirradiated (control) rats at 6 weeks (*P < 0.05). No difference was observed for results between the irradiated group and controls at 4 weeks. n = number of rats.
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RRU095F2: Radiation-induced increase in breathing rate. Breaths per minute (Y-axis) are presented as means with standard deviations. Irradiated rats (15 Gy) had higher breathing rate than unirradiated (control) rats at 6 weeks (*P < 0.05). No difference was observed for results between the irradiated group and controls at 4 weeks. n = number of rats.

Mentions: Body weights in irradiated and control rats were obtained immediately prior to irradiation, and at 4 and 6 weeks after irradiation, as an index of overall health (Fig. 1 and Table 1). By 6 weeks after irradiation, the weight of treated rats was below that of their control littermates (Fig. 1 and Table 1). Breathing rates appear in Fig. 2 and Table 1. Irradiated and control rats have similar breathing rates at 4 weeks, but by 6 weeks following 15 Gy irradiated rats developed tachypnea. Irradiated rats had lower values of arterial oxygen saturation than that of controls and that of the same rats examined at 5 weeks (Fig. 3 and Table 1). Lungs from irradiated rats doubled in wet weight and were visibly larger in size than those of control animals (Table 1). There was a modest increase in the wet:dry weight ratio of the lungs, which could be due to a protein-rich edema as well as an increase in cellularity (Table 1). Lung histology showed increased inflammatory cells as well as alveolar and vessel wall thickness, but a decrease in erythrocytes in irradiated lungs (Fig. 4). Summated histological scores for these parameters (see Methods and Table 1) were higher in irradiated rats than controls. The presence and volume of pleural effusions was variable (0–8.5 ml), occurring in 76% of irradiated rats but not in unirradiated controls (Table 1). An increase in the right ventricular mass was observed after 15 Gy (Table 1).Fig. 4.


Whole-thorax irradiation induces hypoxic respiratory failure, pleural effusions and cardiac remodeling.

Medhora M, Gao F, Glisch C, Narayanan J, Sharma A, Harmann LM, Lawlor MW, Snyder LA, Fish BL, Down JD, Moulder JE, Strande JL, Jacobs ER - J. Radiat. Res. (2014)

Radiation-induced increase in breathing rate. Breaths per minute (Y-axis) are presented as means with standard deviations. Irradiated rats (15 Gy) had higher breathing rate than unirradiated (control) rats at 6 weeks (*P < 0.05). No difference was observed for results between the irradiated group and controls at 4 weeks. n = number of rats.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4380043&req=5

RRU095F2: Radiation-induced increase in breathing rate. Breaths per minute (Y-axis) are presented as means with standard deviations. Irradiated rats (15 Gy) had higher breathing rate than unirradiated (control) rats at 6 weeks (*P < 0.05). No difference was observed for results between the irradiated group and controls at 4 weeks. n = number of rats.
Mentions: Body weights in irradiated and control rats were obtained immediately prior to irradiation, and at 4 and 6 weeks after irradiation, as an index of overall health (Fig. 1 and Table 1). By 6 weeks after irradiation, the weight of treated rats was below that of their control littermates (Fig. 1 and Table 1). Breathing rates appear in Fig. 2 and Table 1. Irradiated and control rats have similar breathing rates at 4 weeks, but by 6 weeks following 15 Gy irradiated rats developed tachypnea. Irradiated rats had lower values of arterial oxygen saturation than that of controls and that of the same rats examined at 5 weeks (Fig. 3 and Table 1). Lungs from irradiated rats doubled in wet weight and were visibly larger in size than those of control animals (Table 1). There was a modest increase in the wet:dry weight ratio of the lungs, which could be due to a protein-rich edema as well as an increase in cellularity (Table 1). Lung histology showed increased inflammatory cells as well as alveolar and vessel wall thickness, but a decrease in erythrocytes in irradiated lungs (Fig. 4). Summated histological scores for these parameters (see Methods and Table 1) were higher in irradiated rats than controls. The presence and volume of pleural effusions was variable (0–8.5 ml), occurring in 76% of irradiated rats but not in unirradiated controls (Table 1). An increase in the right ventricular mass was observed after 15 Gy (Table 1).Fig. 4.

Bottom Line: Lethal irradiation to rat lungs leads to hypoxia with infiltration of immune cells, edema and pleural effusion.These changes may contribute to pulmonary vascular and parenchymal injury that result in secondary changes in heart structure and function.We report that conditions resembling congestive heart failure contribute to death during radiation pneumonitis, which indicates new targets for therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701, Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA Cardiovascular Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701, Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701, Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA Research Service, Department of Veteran's Affairs, Clement J. Zablocki VA Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA medhoram@mcw.edu.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus