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The role of the right temporoparietal junction in the control of imitation.

Sowden S, Catmur C - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

Bottom Line: Brain imaging studies have implicated the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ) in this ability, but causal evidence for its role is lacking.A debate is also ongoing regarding whether the control of, or switching between, self and other representations is a specialized or domain-general process: the rTPJ's well-established role in reorienting attention supports a domain-general process, but a role specific to social cognition has also been proposed.This suggests that the rTPJ is involved in switching between self and other representations, and further, that this process may not be entirely domain general.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Examples of task-irrelevant hand stimuli. Labels denote spatial and imitative compatibility of stimuli on the standard trials, illustrating the 2 × 2 design, and left- or right-hand stimuli on the baseline trials, and are with respect to the required finger lift shown (e.g., index finger lift; when a middle finger lift is required, levels of spatial and imitative compatibility are each reversed). Each hand stimulus shown was presented a total of 18 times during each stimulation condition. (B) One full trial in the experiment. Participants were first instructed to replace the index and middle fingers of their right hand on the “N” and “M” keys, respectively. After a brief interval (900 ms), the static hand and fixation square were presented (SOA: 1600, 2000, or 2400 ms), followed by the simultaneous onset of both the rTMS pulses (6 pulses at 10 Hz per trial) and the task-irrelevant stimulus, presented for 480 ms. Responses (finger lifts) were made according to the color of the task-relevant cue (orange or purple) presented with the task-irrelevant stimulus. For the response mapping for which orange = index finger lift, this trial is imitatively and spatially incompatible, whereas for the response mapping for which orange = middle finger lift, it is imitatively and spatially compatible.
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BHT306F1: (A) Examples of task-irrelevant hand stimuli. Labels denote spatial and imitative compatibility of stimuli on the standard trials, illustrating the 2 × 2 design, and left- or right-hand stimuli on the baseline trials, and are with respect to the required finger lift shown (e.g., index finger lift; when a middle finger lift is required, levels of spatial and imitative compatibility are each reversed). Each hand stimulus shown was presented a total of 18 times during each stimulation condition. (B) One full trial in the experiment. Participants were first instructed to replace the index and middle fingers of their right hand on the “N” and “M” keys, respectively. After a brief interval (900 ms), the static hand and fixation square were presented (SOA: 1600, 2000, or 2400 ms), followed by the simultaneous onset of both the rTMS pulses (6 pulses at 10 Hz per trial) and the task-irrelevant stimulus, presented for 480 ms. Responses (finger lifts) were made according to the color of the task-relevant cue (orange or purple) presented with the task-irrelevant stimulus. For the response mapping for which orange = index finger lift, this trial is imitatively and spatially incompatible, whereas for the response mapping for which orange = middle finger lift, it is imitatively and spatially compatible.

Mentions: Catmur and Heyes (2011) demonstrated that both imitative and spatial compatibility effects can be obtained in the same task by crossing the factors of imitative and spatial compatibility. Thus, on any given standard trial, the task-irrelevant action is either imitatively incompatible or imitatively compatible; and either spatially incompatible or compatible, resulting in 4 different trial types (Fig. 1A). Here, we used a modified version of Catmur and Heyes’ (2011) task with the addition of baseline trials (Wiggett et al. 2013) in which the cue to lift is accompanied by a pixelated image of the resting task-irrelevant hand. The inclusion of these baseline trials can be considered an appropriate control task, as they produce the same temporal alerting effects as the task-irrelevant actions in standard trials and allow the measurement of baseline RTs without the influence of task-irrelevant actions. Such a control task is crucial in revealing whether rTPJ stimulation has an effect simply on one's ability to perform instructed finger lifts in the absence of compatible and incompatible task-irrelevant stimuli.Figure 1.


The role of the right temporoparietal junction in the control of imitation.

Sowden S, Catmur C - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

(A) Examples of task-irrelevant hand stimuli. Labels denote spatial and imitative compatibility of stimuli on the standard trials, illustrating the 2 × 2 design, and left- or right-hand stimuli on the baseline trials, and are with respect to the required finger lift shown (e.g., index finger lift; when a middle finger lift is required, levels of spatial and imitative compatibility are each reversed). Each hand stimulus shown was presented a total of 18 times during each stimulation condition. (B) One full trial in the experiment. Participants were first instructed to replace the index and middle fingers of their right hand on the “N” and “M” keys, respectively. After a brief interval (900 ms), the static hand and fixation square were presented (SOA: 1600, 2000, or 2400 ms), followed by the simultaneous onset of both the rTMS pulses (6 pulses at 10 Hz per trial) and the task-irrelevant stimulus, presented for 480 ms. Responses (finger lifts) were made according to the color of the task-relevant cue (orange or purple) presented with the task-irrelevant stimulus. For the response mapping for which orange = index finger lift, this trial is imitatively and spatially incompatible, whereas for the response mapping for which orange = middle finger lift, it is imitatively and spatially compatible.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4380005&req=5

BHT306F1: (A) Examples of task-irrelevant hand stimuli. Labels denote spatial and imitative compatibility of stimuli on the standard trials, illustrating the 2 × 2 design, and left- or right-hand stimuli on the baseline trials, and are with respect to the required finger lift shown (e.g., index finger lift; when a middle finger lift is required, levels of spatial and imitative compatibility are each reversed). Each hand stimulus shown was presented a total of 18 times during each stimulation condition. (B) One full trial in the experiment. Participants were first instructed to replace the index and middle fingers of their right hand on the “N” and “M” keys, respectively. After a brief interval (900 ms), the static hand and fixation square were presented (SOA: 1600, 2000, or 2400 ms), followed by the simultaneous onset of both the rTMS pulses (6 pulses at 10 Hz per trial) and the task-irrelevant stimulus, presented for 480 ms. Responses (finger lifts) were made according to the color of the task-relevant cue (orange or purple) presented with the task-irrelevant stimulus. For the response mapping for which orange = index finger lift, this trial is imitatively and spatially incompatible, whereas for the response mapping for which orange = middle finger lift, it is imitatively and spatially compatible.
Mentions: Catmur and Heyes (2011) demonstrated that both imitative and spatial compatibility effects can be obtained in the same task by crossing the factors of imitative and spatial compatibility. Thus, on any given standard trial, the task-irrelevant action is either imitatively incompatible or imitatively compatible; and either spatially incompatible or compatible, resulting in 4 different trial types (Fig. 1A). Here, we used a modified version of Catmur and Heyes’ (2011) task with the addition of baseline trials (Wiggett et al. 2013) in which the cue to lift is accompanied by a pixelated image of the resting task-irrelevant hand. The inclusion of these baseline trials can be considered an appropriate control task, as they produce the same temporal alerting effects as the task-irrelevant actions in standard trials and allow the measurement of baseline RTs without the influence of task-irrelevant actions. Such a control task is crucial in revealing whether rTPJ stimulation has an effect simply on one's ability to perform instructed finger lifts in the absence of compatible and incompatible task-irrelevant stimuli.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Brain imaging studies have implicated the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ) in this ability, but causal evidence for its role is lacking.A debate is also ongoing regarding whether the control of, or switching between, self and other representations is a specialized or domain-general process: the rTPJ's well-established role in reorienting attention supports a domain-general process, but a role specific to social cognition has also been proposed.This suggests that the rTPJ is involved in switching between self and other representations, and further, that this process may not be entirely domain general.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus