Limits...
The stream of experience when watching artistic movies. Dynamic aesthetic effects revealed by the Continuous Evaluation Procedure (CEP).

Muth C, Raab MH, Carbon CC - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: We conducted empirical studies on indeterminate artistic movies depicting the evolution and metamorphosis of Gestalt and investigated (i) the effects of sudden perceptual insights on liking; that is, "Aesthetic Aha"-effects, (ii) the dynamics of interest before moments of insight, and (iii) the dynamics of complexity before and after moments of insight.Statistically significant changes in liking and interest demonstrated that: (i) insights increase liking, (ii) interest already increases 1500 ms before such moments of insight, supporting the idea that it is evoked by an expectation of understanding, and (iii) insights occur during increasing complexity.Our results point to the importance of systematic analyses of dynamics in art perception and appreciation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Psychology and Methodology, University of Bamberg Bamberg, Germany ; Bamberg Graduate School of Affective and Cognitive Sciences, University of Bamberg Bamberg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Research in perception and appreciation is often focused on snapshots, stills of experience. Static approaches allow for multidimensional assessment, but are unable to catch the crucial dynamics of affective and perceptual processes; for instance, aesthetic phenomena such as the "Aesthetic-Aha" (the increase in liking after the sudden detection of Gestalt), effects of expectation, or Berlyne's idea that "disorientation" with a "promise of success" elicits interest. We conducted empirical studies on indeterminate artistic movies depicting the evolution and metamorphosis of Gestalt and investigated (i) the effects of sudden perceptual insights on liking; that is, "Aesthetic Aha"-effects, (ii) the dynamics of interest before moments of insight, and (iii) the dynamics of complexity before and after moments of insight. Via the so-called Continuous Evaluation Procedure (CEP) enabling analogous evaluation in a continuous way, participants assessed the material on two aesthetic dimensions blockwise either in a gallery or a laboratory. The material's inherent dynamics were described via assessments of liking, interest, determinacy, and surprise along with a computational analysis on the variable complexity. We identified moments of insight as peaks in determinacy and surprise. Statistically significant changes in liking and interest demonstrated that: (i) insights increase liking, (ii) interest already increases 1500 ms before such moments of insight, supporting the idea that it is evoked by an expectation of understanding, and (iii) insights occur during increasing complexity. We propose a preliminary model of dynamics in liking and interest with regard to complexity and perceptual insight and discuss descriptions of participants' experiences of insight. Our results point to the importance of systematic analyses of dynamics in art perception and appreciation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) PExemplary instruction for key variable “determinacy”; (B) Experimental setting and counterbalanced procedure (variables in gray color are not integrated in further analyses; variables in black are key variables). Image courtesy of Claudia Muth.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4379740&req=5

Figure 6: (A) PExemplary instruction for key variable “determinacy”; (B) Experimental setting and counterbalanced procedure (variables in gray color are not integrated in further analyses; variables in black are key variables). Image courtesy of Claudia Muth.

Mentions: Every participant watched the movie twice and evaluated it continuously on one dimension each time via the CEP. The instructions were given together with a graphical representation of the slider and the two poles of the according key dimension (see Figure 6A). Afterwards the participants were asked to push the slider up and down to get a feeling for the usability of the apparatus. One group then evaluated the key dimensions of liking and determinacy in two subsequent trials in an art gallery (“Griesbadgalerie” in Ulm, Germany; in a room separate from the exhibition, see Supplementary Material B). To minimize order effects, the order of the two dimensions was counterbalanced (for a visualization of the setting and the rationale of the counterbalanced design see Figure 6B). These dimensions were complemented by further testing sessions with other groups of people on the dimensions of surprise at an experimental laboratory at the University of Bamberg, Germany to be able to define insight moments as a combination of determinacy and surprise. Furthermore, we included interest as a second dimension of aesthetic appreciation by additional assessment in the same lab setting. We decided to follow this strategy as we were mainly interested in liking and determinacy and aimed to test these variables under the ecological condition of a gallery context. But to test in a gallery also means to limit the experimental approach: precisely, when testing in a gallery, the number of volunteering gallery visitors is limited, and testing runs the risk of disturbing the experience of other visitors. This made us develop the design of capturing the two key variables of aesthetic experience in the gallery and the additional variables in the laboratory (all variables were asked for in an order-balanced way). We stuck to this one-person-two-dimensions design for the gallery testing for other aesthetic factors, too, in order to keep the design consistent. After the second evaluation phase, participants filled out a questionnaire to “describe in a few own words how it felt to suddenly recognize something clearly.”


The stream of experience when watching artistic movies. Dynamic aesthetic effects revealed by the Continuous Evaluation Procedure (CEP).

Muth C, Raab MH, Carbon CC - Front Psychol (2015)

(A) PExemplary instruction for key variable “determinacy”; (B) Experimental setting and counterbalanced procedure (variables in gray color are not integrated in further analyses; variables in black are key variables). Image courtesy of Claudia Muth.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4379740&req=5

Figure 6: (A) PExemplary instruction for key variable “determinacy”; (B) Experimental setting and counterbalanced procedure (variables in gray color are not integrated in further analyses; variables in black are key variables). Image courtesy of Claudia Muth.
Mentions: Every participant watched the movie twice and evaluated it continuously on one dimension each time via the CEP. The instructions were given together with a graphical representation of the slider and the two poles of the according key dimension (see Figure 6A). Afterwards the participants were asked to push the slider up and down to get a feeling for the usability of the apparatus. One group then evaluated the key dimensions of liking and determinacy in two subsequent trials in an art gallery (“Griesbadgalerie” in Ulm, Germany; in a room separate from the exhibition, see Supplementary Material B). To minimize order effects, the order of the two dimensions was counterbalanced (for a visualization of the setting and the rationale of the counterbalanced design see Figure 6B). These dimensions were complemented by further testing sessions with other groups of people on the dimensions of surprise at an experimental laboratory at the University of Bamberg, Germany to be able to define insight moments as a combination of determinacy and surprise. Furthermore, we included interest as a second dimension of aesthetic appreciation by additional assessment in the same lab setting. We decided to follow this strategy as we were mainly interested in liking and determinacy and aimed to test these variables under the ecological condition of a gallery context. But to test in a gallery also means to limit the experimental approach: precisely, when testing in a gallery, the number of volunteering gallery visitors is limited, and testing runs the risk of disturbing the experience of other visitors. This made us develop the design of capturing the two key variables of aesthetic experience in the gallery and the additional variables in the laboratory (all variables were asked for in an order-balanced way). We stuck to this one-person-two-dimensions design for the gallery testing for other aesthetic factors, too, in order to keep the design consistent. After the second evaluation phase, participants filled out a questionnaire to “describe in a few own words how it felt to suddenly recognize something clearly.”

Bottom Line: We conducted empirical studies on indeterminate artistic movies depicting the evolution and metamorphosis of Gestalt and investigated (i) the effects of sudden perceptual insights on liking; that is, "Aesthetic Aha"-effects, (ii) the dynamics of interest before moments of insight, and (iii) the dynamics of complexity before and after moments of insight.Statistically significant changes in liking and interest demonstrated that: (i) insights increase liking, (ii) interest already increases 1500 ms before such moments of insight, supporting the idea that it is evoked by an expectation of understanding, and (iii) insights occur during increasing complexity.Our results point to the importance of systematic analyses of dynamics in art perception and appreciation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Psychology and Methodology, University of Bamberg Bamberg, Germany ; Bamberg Graduate School of Affective and Cognitive Sciences, University of Bamberg Bamberg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Research in perception and appreciation is often focused on snapshots, stills of experience. Static approaches allow for multidimensional assessment, but are unable to catch the crucial dynamics of affective and perceptual processes; for instance, aesthetic phenomena such as the "Aesthetic-Aha" (the increase in liking after the sudden detection of Gestalt), effects of expectation, or Berlyne's idea that "disorientation" with a "promise of success" elicits interest. We conducted empirical studies on indeterminate artistic movies depicting the evolution and metamorphosis of Gestalt and investigated (i) the effects of sudden perceptual insights on liking; that is, "Aesthetic Aha"-effects, (ii) the dynamics of interest before moments of insight, and (iii) the dynamics of complexity before and after moments of insight. Via the so-called Continuous Evaluation Procedure (CEP) enabling analogous evaluation in a continuous way, participants assessed the material on two aesthetic dimensions blockwise either in a gallery or a laboratory. The material's inherent dynamics were described via assessments of liking, interest, determinacy, and surprise along with a computational analysis on the variable complexity. We identified moments of insight as peaks in determinacy and surprise. Statistically significant changes in liking and interest demonstrated that: (i) insights increase liking, (ii) interest already increases 1500 ms before such moments of insight, supporting the idea that it is evoked by an expectation of understanding, and (iii) insights occur during increasing complexity. We propose a preliminary model of dynamics in liking and interest with regard to complexity and perceptual insight and discuss descriptions of participants' experiences of insight. Our results point to the importance of systematic analyses of dynamics in art perception and appreciation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus