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Intraspecific polymorphism, interspecific divergence, and the origins of function-altering mutations in deer mouse hemoglobin.

Natarajan C, Hoffmann FG, Lanier HC, Wolf CJ, Cheviron ZA, Spangler ML, Weber RE, Fago A, Storz JF - Mol. Biol. Evol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Variation in Hb-O2 affinity within and among populations of P. maniculatus is attributable to numerous amino acid mutations that have individually small effects.Partly as a result of concerted evolution between tandemly duplicated globin genes, the same amino acid changes that contribute to variation in Hb function within P. maniculatus also contribute to divergence in Hb function among different species of Peromyscus.In the case of function-altering Hb mutations in Peromyscus, there is no qualitative or quantitative distinction between segregating variants within species and fixed differences between species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Allele-sharing between Peromyscus maniculatus and P. keeni is attributable to interparalog HBA-T3→HBA-T1/T2 gene conversion that has occurred independently in each species. Site-specific patterns of allele frequency variation in the transcriptionally active HBA-T1 and HBA-T2 genes and the HBA-T3 pseudogene of P. maniculatus (above) and sequence variation in the corresponding orthologs of P. keeni (below). Shaded columns depict nine sites (34, 36, 57, 58, 60, 64, 71, 72, and 78) that harbor shared amino acid polymorphisms between the HBA-T1 and HBA-T2 genes of P. maniculatus and the HBA-T2 gene of P. keeni. At each of the nine sites, the shared minor allele is fixed or present at high frequency in the HBA-T3 pseudogenes of both species. At site 34, for example, Cys (C) is fixed or nearly fixed in the HBA-T1 and HBA-T2 paralogs of both P. maniculatus and P. keeni, whereas Glu (E) is the major allele at this site in the HBA-T3 paralog of both species. The same pattern is evident at the remaining eight sites. In the HBA-T2 gene of P. keeni, conversion tracts from the HBA-T3 donor sequence (shown in boxes) span all of exon 2 and 57–100% of exon 3 in the adjacent HBA-T2 gene. In P. maniculatus, the same variants were independently derived via HBA-T3→HBA-T1/T2 gene conversion and are present at low frequency across the species’ range. Although the conversion tracts are depicted in the alignment of amino acid sequences, the gene conversion tracts were identified on the basis of the underlying nucleotide variation; see Materials and Methods).
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msu403-F5: Allele-sharing between Peromyscus maniculatus and P. keeni is attributable to interparalog HBA-T3→HBA-T1/T2 gene conversion that has occurred independently in each species. Site-specific patterns of allele frequency variation in the transcriptionally active HBA-T1 and HBA-T2 genes and the HBA-T3 pseudogene of P. maniculatus (above) and sequence variation in the corresponding orthologs of P. keeni (below). Shaded columns depict nine sites (34, 36, 57, 58, 60, 64, 71, 72, and 78) that harbor shared amino acid polymorphisms between the HBA-T1 and HBA-T2 genes of P. maniculatus and the HBA-T2 gene of P. keeni. At each of the nine sites, the shared minor allele is fixed or present at high frequency in the HBA-T3 pseudogenes of both species. At site 34, for example, Cys (C) is fixed or nearly fixed in the HBA-T1 and HBA-T2 paralogs of both P. maniculatus and P. keeni, whereas Glu (E) is the major allele at this site in the HBA-T3 paralog of both species. The same pattern is evident at the remaining eight sites. In the HBA-T2 gene of P. keeni, conversion tracts from the HBA-T3 donor sequence (shown in boxes) span all of exon 2 and 57–100% of exon 3 in the adjacent HBA-T2 gene. In P. maniculatus, the same variants were independently derived via HBA-T3→HBA-T1/T2 gene conversion and are present at low frequency across the species’ range. Although the conversion tracts are depicted in the alignment of amino acid sequences, the gene conversion tracts were identified on the basis of the underlying nucleotide variation; see Materials and Methods).

Mentions: The history of interparalog gene conversion also contributes to shared polymorphism between species. For example, there are nine amino acid polymorphisms shared between the HBA-T1 and HBA-T2 genes of P. maniculatus and the HBA-T2 gene of P. keeni and shared minor alleles at each site are either fixed or are present at high frequency at paralogous sites of the HBA-T3 pseudogenes in each species. In two distinct HBA-T2 alleles of P. keeni, novel amino acid variants are contained within T3-derived conversion tracts (515–1,022 bp in length, excluding gaps) that span all of exon 2 and 57–100% of exon 3 (fig. 5). For the ten HBA-T2 sites segregating T3-derived amino acid variants (fig. 5), the average persite probability of detecting interparalog gene conversion was ψ = 0.996. These results indicate that shared polymorphisms between closely related species are not necessarily attributable to incomplete lineage sorting or introgressive hybridization; in the HBA genes of P. maniculatus and P. keeni, transpecific polymorphism is clearly attributable to recurrent HBA-T3→HBA-T1/T2 gene conversion that has occurred independently in each species.Fig. 5.


Intraspecific polymorphism, interspecific divergence, and the origins of function-altering mutations in deer mouse hemoglobin.

Natarajan C, Hoffmann FG, Lanier HC, Wolf CJ, Cheviron ZA, Spangler ML, Weber RE, Fago A, Storz JF - Mol. Biol. Evol. (2015)

Allele-sharing between Peromyscus maniculatus and P. keeni is attributable to interparalog HBA-T3→HBA-T1/T2 gene conversion that has occurred independently in each species. Site-specific patterns of allele frequency variation in the transcriptionally active HBA-T1 and HBA-T2 genes and the HBA-T3 pseudogene of P. maniculatus (above) and sequence variation in the corresponding orthologs of P. keeni (below). Shaded columns depict nine sites (34, 36, 57, 58, 60, 64, 71, 72, and 78) that harbor shared amino acid polymorphisms between the HBA-T1 and HBA-T2 genes of P. maniculatus and the HBA-T2 gene of P. keeni. At each of the nine sites, the shared minor allele is fixed or present at high frequency in the HBA-T3 pseudogenes of both species. At site 34, for example, Cys (C) is fixed or nearly fixed in the HBA-T1 and HBA-T2 paralogs of both P. maniculatus and P. keeni, whereas Glu (E) is the major allele at this site in the HBA-T3 paralog of both species. The same pattern is evident at the remaining eight sites. In the HBA-T2 gene of P. keeni, conversion tracts from the HBA-T3 donor sequence (shown in boxes) span all of exon 2 and 57–100% of exon 3 in the adjacent HBA-T2 gene. In P. maniculatus, the same variants were independently derived via HBA-T3→HBA-T1/T2 gene conversion and are present at low frequency across the species’ range. Although the conversion tracts are depicted in the alignment of amino acid sequences, the gene conversion tracts were identified on the basis of the underlying nucleotide variation; see Materials and Methods).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4379404&req=5

msu403-F5: Allele-sharing between Peromyscus maniculatus and P. keeni is attributable to interparalog HBA-T3→HBA-T1/T2 gene conversion that has occurred independently in each species. Site-specific patterns of allele frequency variation in the transcriptionally active HBA-T1 and HBA-T2 genes and the HBA-T3 pseudogene of P. maniculatus (above) and sequence variation in the corresponding orthologs of P. keeni (below). Shaded columns depict nine sites (34, 36, 57, 58, 60, 64, 71, 72, and 78) that harbor shared amino acid polymorphisms between the HBA-T1 and HBA-T2 genes of P. maniculatus and the HBA-T2 gene of P. keeni. At each of the nine sites, the shared minor allele is fixed or present at high frequency in the HBA-T3 pseudogenes of both species. At site 34, for example, Cys (C) is fixed or nearly fixed in the HBA-T1 and HBA-T2 paralogs of both P. maniculatus and P. keeni, whereas Glu (E) is the major allele at this site in the HBA-T3 paralog of both species. The same pattern is evident at the remaining eight sites. In the HBA-T2 gene of P. keeni, conversion tracts from the HBA-T3 donor sequence (shown in boxes) span all of exon 2 and 57–100% of exon 3 in the adjacent HBA-T2 gene. In P. maniculatus, the same variants were independently derived via HBA-T3→HBA-T1/T2 gene conversion and are present at low frequency across the species’ range. Although the conversion tracts are depicted in the alignment of amino acid sequences, the gene conversion tracts were identified on the basis of the underlying nucleotide variation; see Materials and Methods).
Mentions: The history of interparalog gene conversion also contributes to shared polymorphism between species. For example, there are nine amino acid polymorphisms shared between the HBA-T1 and HBA-T2 genes of P. maniculatus and the HBA-T2 gene of P. keeni and shared minor alleles at each site are either fixed or are present at high frequency at paralogous sites of the HBA-T3 pseudogenes in each species. In two distinct HBA-T2 alleles of P. keeni, novel amino acid variants are contained within T3-derived conversion tracts (515–1,022 bp in length, excluding gaps) that span all of exon 2 and 57–100% of exon 3 (fig. 5). For the ten HBA-T2 sites segregating T3-derived amino acid variants (fig. 5), the average persite probability of detecting interparalog gene conversion was ψ = 0.996. These results indicate that shared polymorphisms between closely related species are not necessarily attributable to incomplete lineage sorting or introgressive hybridization; in the HBA genes of P. maniculatus and P. keeni, transpecific polymorphism is clearly attributable to recurrent HBA-T3→HBA-T1/T2 gene conversion that has occurred independently in each species.Fig. 5.

Bottom Line: Variation in Hb-O2 affinity within and among populations of P. maniculatus is attributable to numerous amino acid mutations that have individually small effects.Partly as a result of concerted evolution between tandemly duplicated globin genes, the same amino acid changes that contribute to variation in Hb function within P. maniculatus also contribute to divergence in Hb function among different species of Peromyscus.In the case of function-altering Hb mutations in Peromyscus, there is no qualitative or quantitative distinction between segregating variants within species and fixed differences between species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus