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Gene turnover in the avian globin gene families and evolutionary changes in hemoglobin isoform expression.

Opazo JC, Hoffmann FG, Natarajan C, Witt CC, Berenbrink M, Storz JF - Mol. Biol. Evol. (2014)

Bottom Line: Due to consistent differences in O2-binding properties between HbD and the major adult-expressed Hb isoform, HbA (which incorporates products of the α(A)-globin gene), recurrent losses of α(D)-globin contribute to among-species variation in blood-O2 affinity.Analysis of HbA/HbD expression levels in the red blood cells of 122 bird species revealed high variability among lineages and strong phylogenetic signal.In comparison with the homologous gene clusters in mammals, the low retention rate for lineage-specific gene duplicates in the avian globin gene clusters suggests that the developmental regulation of Hb synthesis in birds may be more highly conserved, with orthologous genes having similar stage-specific expression profiles and similar functional properties in disparate taxa.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Ciencias Ambientales y Evolutivas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Bayesian phylogeny depicting relationships among avian α-type globin genes based on nucleotide sequence data. Sequences of α-type globin genes from other tetrapod vertebrates (axolotl salamander [Ambystoma mexicanum], western clawed frog [Xenopus tropicalis], anole lizard [Anolis carolinensis], painted turtle [Chrysemys picta], platypus [Ornithorhynchus anatinus], and human [Homo sapiens]) were used as outgroups. Bayesian posterior probabilities are shown for the ancestral nodes of each clade of orthologous avian genes.
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msu341-F3: Bayesian phylogeny depicting relationships among avian α-type globin genes based on nucleotide sequence data. Sequences of α-type globin genes from other tetrapod vertebrates (axolotl salamander [Ambystoma mexicanum], western clawed frog [Xenopus tropicalis], anole lizard [Anolis carolinensis], painted turtle [Chrysemys picta], platypus [Ornithorhynchus anatinus], and human [Homo sapiens]) were used as outgroups. Bayesian posterior probabilities are shown for the ancestral nodes of each clade of orthologous avian genes.

Mentions: To reconstruct phylogenetic relationships and to examine patterns of molecular evolution, we analyzed all available α- and β-type globin sequences from a phylogenetically diverse set of 83 bird species. Phylogeny reconstructions based on coding sequence confirmed that the paralogous α-type globin genes grouped into three well-supported clades and clearly identifiable orthologs of each gene are present in other amniote taxa (fig. 3). Similarly, the phylogeny reconstruction of β-type genes recovered four clades representing the ρ-, βH-, βA-, and ε-globin paralogs (fig. 4). The four avian β-type paralogs are reciprocally monophyletic relative to the β-type globins of other amniotes, indicating that they represent the products of at least three successive rounds of tandem duplication in the stem lineage of birds. The phylogeny revealed several cases of interparalog gene conversion between the embryonic ρ- and ε-globin genes, as documented previously in analyses of the chicken and zebra finch β-globin gene clusters (Reitman et al. 1993; Hoffmann, Storz, et al. 2010). A history of interparalog gene conversion between ρ- and ε-globin is evident in several cases where sequences from genes that are positional homologs of ρ-globin are nested within the clade of ε-globin sequences, and vice versa (fig. 4). For example, ρ- and ε-globin coding sequences of downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) were placed sister to one another in what is otherwise a clade of ρ-globin sequences (fig. 4), indicating that the ε-globin gene of this species has been completely overwritten by ρ→ε gene conversion. Additional examples of interparalog gene conversion between the ρ- and ε-globin genes are evident in phylogeny reconstructions with more extensive taxon sampling (supplementary fig. S1, Supplementary Material online).Fig. 3.


Gene turnover in the avian globin gene families and evolutionary changes in hemoglobin isoform expression.

Opazo JC, Hoffmann FG, Natarajan C, Witt CC, Berenbrink M, Storz JF - Mol. Biol. Evol. (2014)

Bayesian phylogeny depicting relationships among avian α-type globin genes based on nucleotide sequence data. Sequences of α-type globin genes from other tetrapod vertebrates (axolotl salamander [Ambystoma mexicanum], western clawed frog [Xenopus tropicalis], anole lizard [Anolis carolinensis], painted turtle [Chrysemys picta], platypus [Ornithorhynchus anatinus], and human [Homo sapiens]) were used as outgroups. Bayesian posterior probabilities are shown for the ancestral nodes of each clade of orthologous avian genes.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4379397&req=5

msu341-F3: Bayesian phylogeny depicting relationships among avian α-type globin genes based on nucleotide sequence data. Sequences of α-type globin genes from other tetrapod vertebrates (axolotl salamander [Ambystoma mexicanum], western clawed frog [Xenopus tropicalis], anole lizard [Anolis carolinensis], painted turtle [Chrysemys picta], platypus [Ornithorhynchus anatinus], and human [Homo sapiens]) were used as outgroups. Bayesian posterior probabilities are shown for the ancestral nodes of each clade of orthologous avian genes.
Mentions: To reconstruct phylogenetic relationships and to examine patterns of molecular evolution, we analyzed all available α- and β-type globin sequences from a phylogenetically diverse set of 83 bird species. Phylogeny reconstructions based on coding sequence confirmed that the paralogous α-type globin genes grouped into three well-supported clades and clearly identifiable orthologs of each gene are present in other amniote taxa (fig. 3). Similarly, the phylogeny reconstruction of β-type genes recovered four clades representing the ρ-, βH-, βA-, and ε-globin paralogs (fig. 4). The four avian β-type paralogs are reciprocally monophyletic relative to the β-type globins of other amniotes, indicating that they represent the products of at least three successive rounds of tandem duplication in the stem lineage of birds. The phylogeny revealed several cases of interparalog gene conversion between the embryonic ρ- and ε-globin genes, as documented previously in analyses of the chicken and zebra finch β-globin gene clusters (Reitman et al. 1993; Hoffmann, Storz, et al. 2010). A history of interparalog gene conversion between ρ- and ε-globin is evident in several cases where sequences from genes that are positional homologs of ρ-globin are nested within the clade of ε-globin sequences, and vice versa (fig. 4). For example, ρ- and ε-globin coding sequences of downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) were placed sister to one another in what is otherwise a clade of ρ-globin sequences (fig. 4), indicating that the ε-globin gene of this species has been completely overwritten by ρ→ε gene conversion. Additional examples of interparalog gene conversion between the ρ- and ε-globin genes are evident in phylogeny reconstructions with more extensive taxon sampling (supplementary fig. S1, Supplementary Material online).Fig. 3.

Bottom Line: Due to consistent differences in O2-binding properties between HbD and the major adult-expressed Hb isoform, HbA (which incorporates products of the α(A)-globin gene), recurrent losses of α(D)-globin contribute to among-species variation in blood-O2 affinity.Analysis of HbA/HbD expression levels in the red blood cells of 122 bird species revealed high variability among lineages and strong phylogenetic signal.In comparison with the homologous gene clusters in mammals, the low retention rate for lineage-specific gene duplicates in the avian globin gene clusters suggests that the developmental regulation of Hb synthesis in birds may be more highly conserved, with orthologous genes having similar stage-specific expression profiles and similar functional properties in disparate taxa.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Ciencias Ambientales y Evolutivas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus