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Fucoidan from Macrocystis pyrifera has powerful immune-modulatory effects compared to three other fucoidans.

Zhang W, Oda T, Yu Q, Jin JO - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: However, the immune-modulatory effect of fucoidan from different seaweed extracts has not been thoroughly analyzed and compared.In addition, M. pyrifera fucoidan induced the strongest activation of spleen DCs and T cells and ovalbumin (OVA) specific immune responses compared to other fucoidans.These data suggest that fucoidan from M. pyrifera can be potentially useful as a therapeutic agent for infectious diseases, cancer and an effective adjuvant for vaccine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 201508, China. weiwei061215@126.com.

ABSTRACT
Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide purified from brown algae, has a variety of immune-modulation effects, such as promoting activation of dendritic cells (DCs), natural killer (NK) cells and T cells, and enhancing anti-viral and anti-tumor responses. However, the immune-modulatory effect of fucoidan from different seaweed extracts has not been thoroughly analyzed and compared. We analyzed fucoidans obtained from Ascophyllum nodosum (A. nodosum), Macrocystis pyrifera (M. pyrifera), Undaria pinnatifida (U. pinnatifida) and Fucus vesiculosus (F. vesiculosus) for their effect on the apoptosis of human neutrophils, activation of mouse NK cells, maturation of spleen DCs, proliferation and activation of T cells, and the adjuvant effect in vivo. Fucoidans from M. pyrifera and U. pinnatifida strongly delayed human neutrophil apoptosis at low concentration, whereas fucoidans from A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus delayed human neutrophil apoptosis at higher concentration. Moreover, fucoidan from M. pyrifera promoted NK cell activation and cytotoxic activity against YAC-1 cells. In addition, M. pyrifera fucoidan induced the strongest activation of spleen DCs and T cells and ovalbumin (OVA) specific immune responses compared to other fucoidans. These data suggest that fucoidan from M. pyrifera can be potentially useful as a therapeutic agent for infectious diseases, cancer and an effective adjuvant for vaccine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fucoidans promote antigen-specific T cell proliferation in vivo. C57BL/6 mice were injected with PBS, ovalbumin (OVA) or OVA + fucoidan for 24 h. (A) Frequency of DCs, defined as lineage−CD11c+, were analyzed by flow cytometry; (B) Expression levels of MHC class I and II on the gated lineage−CD11c+ DCs in the spleen (upper panel). MFI of MHC class I and MHC class II is shown (lower panels); (C) Purified CD8 T cells from OT-I or CD4 T cells from OT-II mice were labeled with CFSE and transferred into CD45.1 congenic mice, and 24 h later, mice were injected with PBS, OVA or OVA + fucoidans. After 3 day treatment, splenocytes from these mice were stained for CD45.2 to identify the donor OT-I or OT-II cells and the proliferation of these cells was determined by CFSE dilution. All data are from analyses of six individual mice each group (two mice per experiment, total of three independent experiments). Data shown are the mean ± SEM. *p < 0.05; **p < 0.01 versus OVA group.
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marinedrugs-13-01084-f005: Fucoidans promote antigen-specific T cell proliferation in vivo. C57BL/6 mice were injected with PBS, ovalbumin (OVA) or OVA + fucoidan for 24 h. (A) Frequency of DCs, defined as lineage−CD11c+, were analyzed by flow cytometry; (B) Expression levels of MHC class I and II on the gated lineage−CD11c+ DCs in the spleen (upper panel). MFI of MHC class I and MHC class II is shown (lower panels); (C) Purified CD8 T cells from OT-I or CD4 T cells from OT-II mice were labeled with CFSE and transferred into CD45.1 congenic mice, and 24 h later, mice were injected with PBS, OVA or OVA + fucoidans. After 3 day treatment, splenocytes from these mice were stained for CD45.2 to identify the donor OT-I or OT-II cells and the proliferation of these cells was determined by CFSE dilution. All data are from analyses of six individual mice each group (two mice per experiment, total of three independent experiments). Data shown are the mean ± SEM. *p < 0.05; **p < 0.01 versus OVA group.

Mentions: Our finding that fucoidans induce spleen DC and T cell activation in vivo prompted us to further investigate the adjuvant effect of fucoidan in antigen-specific T cell response in vivo. We first examined whether fucoidans can promote antigen-presentation by DCs. Mice were injected with PBS, ovalbumin (OVA) or OVA + fucoidans for 24 h, and then measured for frequency of DCs and expression of MHC classes I and II on spleen lineage−CD11c+ DCs. Consistent with the results shown in Figure 3, the frequency of spleen CD11c+ DCs was dramatically decreased by injection of fucoidans from M. pyrifera or F. vesiculosus (Figure 5A). Moreover, all fucoidans promoted up-regulation of MHC class I and II expression on CD11c+ DCs (Figure 5B). As expected, fucoidan from M. pyrifera induced the greatest up-regulation of these surface proteins among the four fucoidans (Figure 5B). Next, we performed an adoptive transfer experiment to detect OVA-specific OT-I and OT-II T cell proliferation. CFSE-labeled OT-I CD8+ or OT-II CD4+ T cells from CD45.2 TCR-transgenic mice were transferred into CD45.1 congenic mice, and 24 h later, the mice received injection of PBS, OVA or OVA + fucoidans. After 3 days, the proliferation of CD45.2+ OT-I or OT-II cells was determined by CFSE dilution assay. OT-I and OT-II T cell proliferation was robustly increased in mice immunized with OVA + fucoidans compared to those in mice immunized with OVA alone (Figure 5C). Consistent with its effect on DC activation and maturation, fucoidan from M. pyrifera stimulated the strongest antigen-specific T cell proliferation. These data demonstrated that fucoidan functions as an adjuvant to enhance antigen presentation and antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell activation. Moreover, fucoidan from M. pyrifera is the most effective adjuvant in vivo for antigen presentation among the four fucoidans tested.


Fucoidan from Macrocystis pyrifera has powerful immune-modulatory effects compared to three other fucoidans.

Zhang W, Oda T, Yu Q, Jin JO - Mar Drugs (2015)

Fucoidans promote antigen-specific T cell proliferation in vivo. C57BL/6 mice were injected with PBS, ovalbumin (OVA) or OVA + fucoidan for 24 h. (A) Frequency of DCs, defined as lineage−CD11c+, were analyzed by flow cytometry; (B) Expression levels of MHC class I and II on the gated lineage−CD11c+ DCs in the spleen (upper panel). MFI of MHC class I and MHC class II is shown (lower panels); (C) Purified CD8 T cells from OT-I or CD4 T cells from OT-II mice were labeled with CFSE and transferred into CD45.1 congenic mice, and 24 h later, mice were injected with PBS, OVA or OVA + fucoidans. After 3 day treatment, splenocytes from these mice were stained for CD45.2 to identify the donor OT-I or OT-II cells and the proliferation of these cells was determined by CFSE dilution. All data are from analyses of six individual mice each group (two mice per experiment, total of three independent experiments). Data shown are the mean ± SEM. *p < 0.05; **p < 0.01 versus OVA group.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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marinedrugs-13-01084-f005: Fucoidans promote antigen-specific T cell proliferation in vivo. C57BL/6 mice were injected with PBS, ovalbumin (OVA) or OVA + fucoidan for 24 h. (A) Frequency of DCs, defined as lineage−CD11c+, were analyzed by flow cytometry; (B) Expression levels of MHC class I and II on the gated lineage−CD11c+ DCs in the spleen (upper panel). MFI of MHC class I and MHC class II is shown (lower panels); (C) Purified CD8 T cells from OT-I or CD4 T cells from OT-II mice were labeled with CFSE and transferred into CD45.1 congenic mice, and 24 h later, mice were injected with PBS, OVA or OVA + fucoidans. After 3 day treatment, splenocytes from these mice were stained for CD45.2 to identify the donor OT-I or OT-II cells and the proliferation of these cells was determined by CFSE dilution. All data are from analyses of six individual mice each group (two mice per experiment, total of three independent experiments). Data shown are the mean ± SEM. *p < 0.05; **p < 0.01 versus OVA group.
Mentions: Our finding that fucoidans induce spleen DC and T cell activation in vivo prompted us to further investigate the adjuvant effect of fucoidan in antigen-specific T cell response in vivo. We first examined whether fucoidans can promote antigen-presentation by DCs. Mice were injected with PBS, ovalbumin (OVA) or OVA + fucoidans for 24 h, and then measured for frequency of DCs and expression of MHC classes I and II on spleen lineage−CD11c+ DCs. Consistent with the results shown in Figure 3, the frequency of spleen CD11c+ DCs was dramatically decreased by injection of fucoidans from M. pyrifera or F. vesiculosus (Figure 5A). Moreover, all fucoidans promoted up-regulation of MHC class I and II expression on CD11c+ DCs (Figure 5B). As expected, fucoidan from M. pyrifera induced the greatest up-regulation of these surface proteins among the four fucoidans (Figure 5B). Next, we performed an adoptive transfer experiment to detect OVA-specific OT-I and OT-II T cell proliferation. CFSE-labeled OT-I CD8+ or OT-II CD4+ T cells from CD45.2 TCR-transgenic mice were transferred into CD45.1 congenic mice, and 24 h later, the mice received injection of PBS, OVA or OVA + fucoidans. After 3 days, the proliferation of CD45.2+ OT-I or OT-II cells was determined by CFSE dilution assay. OT-I and OT-II T cell proliferation was robustly increased in mice immunized with OVA + fucoidans compared to those in mice immunized with OVA alone (Figure 5C). Consistent with its effect on DC activation and maturation, fucoidan from M. pyrifera stimulated the strongest antigen-specific T cell proliferation. These data demonstrated that fucoidan functions as an adjuvant to enhance antigen presentation and antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell activation. Moreover, fucoidan from M. pyrifera is the most effective adjuvant in vivo for antigen presentation among the four fucoidans tested.

Bottom Line: However, the immune-modulatory effect of fucoidan from different seaweed extracts has not been thoroughly analyzed and compared.In addition, M. pyrifera fucoidan induced the strongest activation of spleen DCs and T cells and ovalbumin (OVA) specific immune responses compared to other fucoidans.These data suggest that fucoidan from M. pyrifera can be potentially useful as a therapeutic agent for infectious diseases, cancer and an effective adjuvant for vaccine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 201508, China. weiwei061215@126.com.

ABSTRACT
Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide purified from brown algae, has a variety of immune-modulation effects, such as promoting activation of dendritic cells (DCs), natural killer (NK) cells and T cells, and enhancing anti-viral and anti-tumor responses. However, the immune-modulatory effect of fucoidan from different seaweed extracts has not been thoroughly analyzed and compared. We analyzed fucoidans obtained from Ascophyllum nodosum (A. nodosum), Macrocystis pyrifera (M. pyrifera), Undaria pinnatifida (U. pinnatifida) and Fucus vesiculosus (F. vesiculosus) for their effect on the apoptosis of human neutrophils, activation of mouse NK cells, maturation of spleen DCs, proliferation and activation of T cells, and the adjuvant effect in vivo. Fucoidans from M. pyrifera and U. pinnatifida strongly delayed human neutrophil apoptosis at low concentration, whereas fucoidans from A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus delayed human neutrophil apoptosis at higher concentration. Moreover, fucoidan from M. pyrifera promoted NK cell activation and cytotoxic activity against YAC-1 cells. In addition, M. pyrifera fucoidan induced the strongest activation of spleen DCs and T cells and ovalbumin (OVA) specific immune responses compared to other fucoidans. These data suggest that fucoidan from M. pyrifera can be potentially useful as a therapeutic agent for infectious diseases, cancer and an effective adjuvant for vaccine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus