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Fucoidan from Macrocystis pyrifera has powerful immune-modulatory effects compared to three other fucoidans.

Zhang W, Oda T, Yu Q, Jin JO - Mar Drugs (2015)

Bottom Line: However, the immune-modulatory effect of fucoidan from different seaweed extracts has not been thoroughly analyzed and compared.In addition, M. pyrifera fucoidan induced the strongest activation of spleen DCs and T cells and ovalbumin (OVA) specific immune responses compared to other fucoidans.These data suggest that fucoidan from M. pyrifera can be potentially useful as a therapeutic agent for infectious diseases, cancer and an effective adjuvant for vaccine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 201508, China. weiwei061215@126.com.

ABSTRACT
Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide purified from brown algae, has a variety of immune-modulation effects, such as promoting activation of dendritic cells (DCs), natural killer (NK) cells and T cells, and enhancing anti-viral and anti-tumor responses. However, the immune-modulatory effect of fucoidan from different seaweed extracts has not been thoroughly analyzed and compared. We analyzed fucoidans obtained from Ascophyllum nodosum (A. nodosum), Macrocystis pyrifera (M. pyrifera), Undaria pinnatifida (U. pinnatifida) and Fucus vesiculosus (F. vesiculosus) for their effect on the apoptosis of human neutrophils, activation of mouse NK cells, maturation of spleen DCs, proliferation and activation of T cells, and the adjuvant effect in vivo. Fucoidans from M. pyrifera and U. pinnatifida strongly delayed human neutrophil apoptosis at low concentration, whereas fucoidans from A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus delayed human neutrophil apoptosis at higher concentration. Moreover, fucoidan from M. pyrifera promoted NK cell activation and cytotoxic activity against YAC-1 cells. In addition, M. pyrifera fucoidan induced the strongest activation of spleen DCs and T cells and ovalbumin (OVA) specific immune responses compared to other fucoidans. These data suggest that fucoidan from M. pyrifera can be potentially useful as a therapeutic agent for infectious diseases, cancer and an effective adjuvant for vaccine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of fucoidans on spontaneous apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine production of human neutrophils. Isolated peripheral blood neutrophils (2 × 105) were cultured with or without fucoidans (10 μg/mL) for 24 h. (A) Cell apoptosis was assessed by Annexin V-FITC and PI staining. Numbers in the plots show the percentage of the cells in the respective quadrant among the total cells shown in the plots; (B) Percentage of early apoptotic cells (Annexin V+PI− cells) was shown. Data are representative or the average of analyses of five samples from five donors for each group; (C) Dose-dependent delay of neutrophil apoptosis by fucoidans was measured by morphological changes. Data are the average of analyses of five samples from five donors; (D) IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α concentrations in the cultured supernatants were measured by ELISA. Data are the average of analyses of 5 samples from 5 donors. Data shown are the mean ± SEM. *p < 0.05; **p < 0.01 versus PBS (phosphate buffered saline) group.
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marinedrugs-13-01084-f001: Effect of fucoidans on spontaneous apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine production of human neutrophils. Isolated peripheral blood neutrophils (2 × 105) were cultured with or without fucoidans (10 μg/mL) for 24 h. (A) Cell apoptosis was assessed by Annexin V-FITC and PI staining. Numbers in the plots show the percentage of the cells in the respective quadrant among the total cells shown in the plots; (B) Percentage of early apoptotic cells (Annexin V+PI− cells) was shown. Data are representative or the average of analyses of five samples from five donors for each group; (C) Dose-dependent delay of neutrophil apoptosis by fucoidans was measured by morphological changes. Data are the average of analyses of five samples from five donors; (D) IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α concentrations in the cultured supernatants were measured by ELISA. Data are the average of analyses of 5 samples from 5 donors. Data shown are the mean ± SEM. *p < 0.05; **p < 0.01 versus PBS (phosphate buffered saline) group.

Mentions: Numerous studies have shown that neutrophil apoptosis can be delayed or accelerated by cytokines and other inflammatory mediators [10,11,12]. Moreover, our recent study showed that fucoidans from U. pinnatifida delayed neutrophil apoptosis [13]. We therefore assessed whether other fucoidans also have similar effect on human neutrophils. Since a common marker of apoptotic cells is phosphatidyl serine (PS) exposure on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, we measured PS exposure by Annexin V staining and flow cytometry to identify the apoptotic cells. In addition, cells were simultaneously stained with propidium Iodide (PI) to identify the late-apoptotic or necrotic cells with membrane that is permeable to PI. Purified human neutrophils were incubated in the presence or absence of 50 μg/mL fucoidan and apoptosis was measured. More than 70% of neutrophils showed spontaneous apoptosis as indicated by positive Annexin V staining after 24 h of culture (Figure 1A). All fucoidans markedly reduced the percentage of Annexin V+PI− cells, which were cells in the early stage of apoptosis, indicating that they inhibited apoptotic cell death (Figure 1A,B). The most potent inhibitors were fucoidan from M. pyrifera and U. pinnatifida, which reduced neutrophil apoptosis by more than 80% as compared to controls, whereas fucoidans from A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus reduced neutrophil apoptosis by approximately 50%. We next assessed the dose-dependent effect of four different fucoidans on neutrophil apoptosis. Fucoidan from M. pyrifera or U. pinnatifida showed a considerable, dose-dependent inhibiting effect on neutrophil apoptosis at concentrations between 5–100 μg/mL, whereas those from A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus only prevented neutrophil apoptosis at concentration of 50–100 μg/mL (Figure 1C).


Fucoidan from Macrocystis pyrifera has powerful immune-modulatory effects compared to three other fucoidans.

Zhang W, Oda T, Yu Q, Jin JO - Mar Drugs (2015)

Effect of fucoidans on spontaneous apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine production of human neutrophils. Isolated peripheral blood neutrophils (2 × 105) were cultured with or without fucoidans (10 μg/mL) for 24 h. (A) Cell apoptosis was assessed by Annexin V-FITC and PI staining. Numbers in the plots show the percentage of the cells in the respective quadrant among the total cells shown in the plots; (B) Percentage of early apoptotic cells (Annexin V+PI− cells) was shown. Data are representative or the average of analyses of five samples from five donors for each group; (C) Dose-dependent delay of neutrophil apoptosis by fucoidans was measured by morphological changes. Data are the average of analyses of five samples from five donors; (D) IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α concentrations in the cultured supernatants were measured by ELISA. Data are the average of analyses of 5 samples from 5 donors. Data shown are the mean ± SEM. *p < 0.05; **p < 0.01 versus PBS (phosphate buffered saline) group.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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marinedrugs-13-01084-f001: Effect of fucoidans on spontaneous apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine production of human neutrophils. Isolated peripheral blood neutrophils (2 × 105) were cultured with or without fucoidans (10 μg/mL) for 24 h. (A) Cell apoptosis was assessed by Annexin V-FITC and PI staining. Numbers in the plots show the percentage of the cells in the respective quadrant among the total cells shown in the plots; (B) Percentage of early apoptotic cells (Annexin V+PI− cells) was shown. Data are representative or the average of analyses of five samples from five donors for each group; (C) Dose-dependent delay of neutrophil apoptosis by fucoidans was measured by morphological changes. Data are the average of analyses of five samples from five donors; (D) IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α concentrations in the cultured supernatants were measured by ELISA. Data are the average of analyses of 5 samples from 5 donors. Data shown are the mean ± SEM. *p < 0.05; **p < 0.01 versus PBS (phosphate buffered saline) group.
Mentions: Numerous studies have shown that neutrophil apoptosis can be delayed or accelerated by cytokines and other inflammatory mediators [10,11,12]. Moreover, our recent study showed that fucoidans from U. pinnatifida delayed neutrophil apoptosis [13]. We therefore assessed whether other fucoidans also have similar effect on human neutrophils. Since a common marker of apoptotic cells is phosphatidyl serine (PS) exposure on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, we measured PS exposure by Annexin V staining and flow cytometry to identify the apoptotic cells. In addition, cells were simultaneously stained with propidium Iodide (PI) to identify the late-apoptotic or necrotic cells with membrane that is permeable to PI. Purified human neutrophils were incubated in the presence or absence of 50 μg/mL fucoidan and apoptosis was measured. More than 70% of neutrophils showed spontaneous apoptosis as indicated by positive Annexin V staining after 24 h of culture (Figure 1A). All fucoidans markedly reduced the percentage of Annexin V+PI− cells, which were cells in the early stage of apoptosis, indicating that they inhibited apoptotic cell death (Figure 1A,B). The most potent inhibitors were fucoidan from M. pyrifera and U. pinnatifida, which reduced neutrophil apoptosis by more than 80% as compared to controls, whereas fucoidans from A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus reduced neutrophil apoptosis by approximately 50%. We next assessed the dose-dependent effect of four different fucoidans on neutrophil apoptosis. Fucoidan from M. pyrifera or U. pinnatifida showed a considerable, dose-dependent inhibiting effect on neutrophil apoptosis at concentrations between 5–100 μg/mL, whereas those from A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus only prevented neutrophil apoptosis at concentration of 50–100 μg/mL (Figure 1C).

Bottom Line: However, the immune-modulatory effect of fucoidan from different seaweed extracts has not been thoroughly analyzed and compared.In addition, M. pyrifera fucoidan induced the strongest activation of spleen DCs and T cells and ovalbumin (OVA) specific immune responses compared to other fucoidans.These data suggest that fucoidan from M. pyrifera can be potentially useful as a therapeutic agent for infectious diseases, cancer and an effective adjuvant for vaccine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 201508, China. weiwei061215@126.com.

ABSTRACT
Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide purified from brown algae, has a variety of immune-modulation effects, such as promoting activation of dendritic cells (DCs), natural killer (NK) cells and T cells, and enhancing anti-viral and anti-tumor responses. However, the immune-modulatory effect of fucoidan from different seaweed extracts has not been thoroughly analyzed and compared. We analyzed fucoidans obtained from Ascophyllum nodosum (A. nodosum), Macrocystis pyrifera (M. pyrifera), Undaria pinnatifida (U. pinnatifida) and Fucus vesiculosus (F. vesiculosus) for their effect on the apoptosis of human neutrophils, activation of mouse NK cells, maturation of spleen DCs, proliferation and activation of T cells, and the adjuvant effect in vivo. Fucoidans from M. pyrifera and U. pinnatifida strongly delayed human neutrophil apoptosis at low concentration, whereas fucoidans from A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus delayed human neutrophil apoptosis at higher concentration. Moreover, fucoidan from M. pyrifera promoted NK cell activation and cytotoxic activity against YAC-1 cells. In addition, M. pyrifera fucoidan induced the strongest activation of spleen DCs and T cells and ovalbumin (OVA) specific immune responses compared to other fucoidans. These data suggest that fucoidan from M. pyrifera can be potentially useful as a therapeutic agent for infectious diseases, cancer and an effective adjuvant for vaccine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus