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Centile curves and reference values for height, body mass, body mass index and waist circumference of Peruvian children and adolescents.

Bustamante A, Freitas D, Pan H, Katzmarzyk PT, Maia J - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Peruvian children are shorter, lighter and have higher BMI than their counterparts in the U.S. and Argentina; in contrast, age and sex-specific WC values are lower.Height, body mass and WC of Peruvian children increased with age and variability was higher at older ages.The growth patterns for height, body mass, BMI and WC among Peruvian children were similar to those observed in North-American and Argentinean peers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National University of Education Enrique Guzmán y Valle, Av. Guzmán y Valle s/n La Cantuta-Chosica, Lima, Peru. huanta2609@yahoo.es.

ABSTRACT
This study aimed to provide height, body mass, BMI and waist circumference (WC) growth centile charts for school-children, aged 4-17 years, from central Peru, and to compare Peruvian data with North-American and Argentinean references. The sample consisted of 8753 children and adolescents (4130 boys and 4623 girls) aged 4 to 17 years, from four Peruvian cities: Barranco, La Merced, San Ramón and Junín. Height, body mass and WC were measured according to standardized techniques. Centile curves for height, body mass, BMI and WC were obtained separately for boys and girls using the LMS method. Student t-tests were used to compare mean values. Overall boys have higher median heights than girls, and the 50th percentile for body mass increases curvilinearly from 4 years of age onwards. In boys, the BMI and WC 50th percentiles increase linearly and in girls, the increase presents a curvilinear pattern. Peruvian children are shorter, lighter and have higher BMI than their counterparts in the U.S. and Argentina; in contrast, age and sex-specific WC values are lower. Height, body mass and WC of Peruvian children increased with age and variability was higher at older ages. The growth patterns for height, body mass, BMI and WC among Peruvian children were similar to those observed in North-American and Argentinean peers.

No MeSH data available.


Smoothed reference curves for the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th and 97th percentiles for height, body mass, body mass index and waist circumference in 4 to 17 year-old Peruvian boys and girls.
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ijerph-12-02905-f002: Smoothed reference curves for the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th and 97th percentiles for height, body mass, body mass index and waist circumference in 4 to 17 year-old Peruvian boys and girls.

Mentions: Age- and gender-specific values for the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 97th centiles are presented in Figure 2 and Table 4 and Table 5. The medians for height increase linearly from 4 to 14 years in boys and from 4 to 11 years in girls, and gradually level off, reaching a value of 165 cm in boys and 153 cm in girls. The increase is higher in boys than in girls. The P50 values for body mass increase curvilinearly from 4 years of age onward; the increase is stepper from 11 to 14 years in boys and from 9 to 11 years in girls. Maximum values are achieved at 17 years for girls (52.3 kg) and boys (58.5 kg).


Centile curves and reference values for height, body mass, body mass index and waist circumference of Peruvian children and adolescents.

Bustamante A, Freitas D, Pan H, Katzmarzyk PT, Maia J - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Smoothed reference curves for the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th and 97th percentiles for height, body mass, body mass index and waist circumference in 4 to 17 year-old Peruvian boys and girls.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4377942&req=5

ijerph-12-02905-f002: Smoothed reference curves for the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th and 97th percentiles for height, body mass, body mass index and waist circumference in 4 to 17 year-old Peruvian boys and girls.
Mentions: Age- and gender-specific values for the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 97th centiles are presented in Figure 2 and Table 4 and Table 5. The medians for height increase linearly from 4 to 14 years in boys and from 4 to 11 years in girls, and gradually level off, reaching a value of 165 cm in boys and 153 cm in girls. The increase is higher in boys than in girls. The P50 values for body mass increase curvilinearly from 4 years of age onward; the increase is stepper from 11 to 14 years in boys and from 9 to 11 years in girls. Maximum values are achieved at 17 years for girls (52.3 kg) and boys (58.5 kg).

Bottom Line: Peruvian children are shorter, lighter and have higher BMI than their counterparts in the U.S. and Argentina; in contrast, age and sex-specific WC values are lower.Height, body mass and WC of Peruvian children increased with age and variability was higher at older ages.The growth patterns for height, body mass, BMI and WC among Peruvian children were similar to those observed in North-American and Argentinean peers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National University of Education Enrique Guzmán y Valle, Av. Guzmán y Valle s/n La Cantuta-Chosica, Lima, Peru. huanta2609@yahoo.es.

ABSTRACT
This study aimed to provide height, body mass, BMI and waist circumference (WC) growth centile charts for school-children, aged 4-17 years, from central Peru, and to compare Peruvian data with North-American and Argentinean references. The sample consisted of 8753 children and adolescents (4130 boys and 4623 girls) aged 4 to 17 years, from four Peruvian cities: Barranco, La Merced, San Ramón and Junín. Height, body mass and WC were measured according to standardized techniques. Centile curves for height, body mass, BMI and WC were obtained separately for boys and girls using the LMS method. Student t-tests were used to compare mean values. Overall boys have higher median heights than girls, and the 50th percentile for body mass increases curvilinearly from 4 years of age onwards. In boys, the BMI and WC 50th percentiles increase linearly and in girls, the increase presents a curvilinear pattern. Peruvian children are shorter, lighter and have higher BMI than their counterparts in the U.S. and Argentina; in contrast, age and sex-specific WC values are lower. Height, body mass and WC of Peruvian children increased with age and variability was higher at older ages. The growth patterns for height, body mass, BMI and WC among Peruvian children were similar to those observed in North-American and Argentinean peers.

No MeSH data available.