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The temporal unfolding of face processing in social anxiety disorder--a MEG study.

Riwkes S, Goldstein A, Gilboa-Schechtman E - Neuroimage Clin (2014)

Bottom Line: We expected that, compared to healthy controls (HCs), participants with SAD will show an early (<200 ms post-stimulus) over-activation in the insula and the fusiform gyrus (FG, associated with the N170/M170 component), and later (>200 ms post-stimulus) over-activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC).As compared to the HC group, the SAD group showed a reduced M170 (right FG under-activation around 130-200 ms); early reduced activation in the right insula, and lower insular sensitivity to the type of EFE displayed.This unique EFE processing pattern in SAD suggests an early under-activation of cortical areas, possibly related to reduced emphasis on high spatial frequency information and greater early emphasis on low spatial frequency information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900, Israel.

ABSTRACT
The current study is the first to use magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine how individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) process emotional facial expressions (EFEs). We expected that, compared to healthy controls (HCs), participants with SAD will show an early (<200 ms post-stimulus) over-activation in the insula and the fusiform gyrus (FG, associated with the N170/M170 component), and later (>200 ms post-stimulus) over-activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Individuals with SAD (n = 12) and healthy controls (HCs, n = 12) were presented with photographs of facial displays during MEG recording. As compared to the HC group, the SAD group showed a reduced M170 (right FG under-activation around 130-200 ms); early reduced activation in the right insula, and lower insular sensitivity to the type of EFE displayed. In addition, the SAD group showed a late over-activation in the right DLPFC. This unique EFE processing pattern in SAD suggests an early under-activation of cortical areas, possibly related to reduced emphasis on high spatial frequency information and greater early emphasis on low spatial frequency information. The late DLPFC over-activation in the SAD group may correlate to failures of cognitive control in this disorder. The importance of a temporal perspective for the understanding of facial processing in psychopathology is underlined.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Different patterns of activation in the right DLPFC for the SAD and HC groups (averaged across facial expressions). a: Time-course of activation for the two groups. For reasons of clarity, this graphic presentation shows a continuous time-line, whereas the statistical analyses were performed on distinct time-windows. b and c: The SAD vs. HC contrast at the 200–300 ms and 300–500 ms time-windows, respectively. Red color depicts areas with significantly greater activity for SAD, blue color depicts areas with significantly less activity for SAD (p < 0.05).
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f0015: Different patterns of activation in the right DLPFC for the SAD and HC groups (averaged across facial expressions). a: Time-course of activation for the two groups. For reasons of clarity, this graphic presentation shows a continuous time-line, whereas the statistical analyses were performed on distinct time-windows. b and c: The SAD vs. HC contrast at the 200–300 ms and 300–500 ms time-windows, respectively. Red color depicts areas with significantly greater activity for SAD, blue color depicts areas with significantly less activity for SAD (p < 0.05).

Mentions: In the right DLPFC, in the 200–300 ms time-window, we found that the HC group showed greater activation than the SAD group (effect of Group, F(1,22) = 12.83, p < 0.01, η2 = 0.21), as can be seen from Fig. 3. In the 300–500 ms time-window, however, the pattern was reversed and individuals with SAD showed greater activity compared to HCs (effect of Group, F(1,22) = 11.85, p < 0.01, η2 = 0.22).


The temporal unfolding of face processing in social anxiety disorder--a MEG study.

Riwkes S, Goldstein A, Gilboa-Schechtman E - Neuroimage Clin (2014)

Different patterns of activation in the right DLPFC for the SAD and HC groups (averaged across facial expressions). a: Time-course of activation for the two groups. For reasons of clarity, this graphic presentation shows a continuous time-line, whereas the statistical analyses were performed on distinct time-windows. b and c: The SAD vs. HC contrast at the 200–300 ms and 300–500 ms time-windows, respectively. Red color depicts areas with significantly greater activity for SAD, blue color depicts areas with significantly less activity for SAD (p < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4377840&req=5

f0015: Different patterns of activation in the right DLPFC for the SAD and HC groups (averaged across facial expressions). a: Time-course of activation for the two groups. For reasons of clarity, this graphic presentation shows a continuous time-line, whereas the statistical analyses were performed on distinct time-windows. b and c: The SAD vs. HC contrast at the 200–300 ms and 300–500 ms time-windows, respectively. Red color depicts areas with significantly greater activity for SAD, blue color depicts areas with significantly less activity for SAD (p < 0.05).
Mentions: In the right DLPFC, in the 200–300 ms time-window, we found that the HC group showed greater activation than the SAD group (effect of Group, F(1,22) = 12.83, p < 0.01, η2 = 0.21), as can be seen from Fig. 3. In the 300–500 ms time-window, however, the pattern was reversed and individuals with SAD showed greater activity compared to HCs (effect of Group, F(1,22) = 11.85, p < 0.01, η2 = 0.22).

Bottom Line: We expected that, compared to healthy controls (HCs), participants with SAD will show an early (<200 ms post-stimulus) over-activation in the insula and the fusiform gyrus (FG, associated with the N170/M170 component), and later (>200 ms post-stimulus) over-activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC).As compared to the HC group, the SAD group showed a reduced M170 (right FG under-activation around 130-200 ms); early reduced activation in the right insula, and lower insular sensitivity to the type of EFE displayed.This unique EFE processing pattern in SAD suggests an early under-activation of cortical areas, possibly related to reduced emphasis on high spatial frequency information and greater early emphasis on low spatial frequency information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900, Israel.

ABSTRACT
The current study is the first to use magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine how individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) process emotional facial expressions (EFEs). We expected that, compared to healthy controls (HCs), participants with SAD will show an early (<200 ms post-stimulus) over-activation in the insula and the fusiform gyrus (FG, associated with the N170/M170 component), and later (>200 ms post-stimulus) over-activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Individuals with SAD (n = 12) and healthy controls (HCs, n = 12) were presented with photographs of facial displays during MEG recording. As compared to the HC group, the SAD group showed a reduced M170 (right FG under-activation around 130-200 ms); early reduced activation in the right insula, and lower insular sensitivity to the type of EFE displayed. In addition, the SAD group showed a late over-activation in the right DLPFC. This unique EFE processing pattern in SAD suggests an early under-activation of cortical areas, possibly related to reduced emphasis on high spatial frequency information and greater early emphasis on low spatial frequency information. The late DLPFC over-activation in the SAD group may correlate to failures of cognitive control in this disorder. The importance of a temporal perspective for the understanding of facial processing in psychopathology is underlined.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus