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Transplantation of autologous mesenchymal stem cells for end-stage liver cirrhosis: a meta-analysis based on seven controlled trials.

Ma XR, Tang YL, Xuan M, Chang Z, Wang XY, Liang XH - Gastroenterol Res Pract (2015)

Bottom Line: The bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have demonstrated great potential as regenerative medicine in different therapeutic applications.Considering currently available evidence, this therapy is relatively safe and effective in improving liver function.However, how different variables should be controlled to optimize the therapeutic effect is still not clear.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, No. 14, 3rd Section, Renmin South Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, China.

ABSTRACT
Background. The bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have demonstrated great potential as regenerative medicine in different therapeutic applications. This study aims to pool previous controlled clinical trials to make an update assessment of the effectiveness of BM-MSC transplantation on end-stage liver cirrhosis. Methods. Relevant studies published between January 1990 and June 2014 were searched among Pubmed, Embase, and ClinicalTrial.gov. A meta-analysis was performed to assess the effect of BM-MSCs on liver function indicators, including Models of End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, serum albumin (g/L), total bilirubin (mg/dl), Prothrombin concentration (%), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (U/L). Results. BM-MSCs therapy could significantly improve liver function in patients with end-stage liver cirrhosis, in terms of MELD score, serum albumin, total bilirubin, and prothrombin concentration, at least during the half year after transplantation. Conclusions. Due to BM-MSCs' immunomodulatory functions and the potential to differentiate into hepatocytes, they are a promising therapeutic agent to liver cirrhosis. Considering currently available evidence, this therapy is relatively safe and effective in improving liver function. However, how different variables should be controlled to optimize the therapeutic effect is still not clear. Thus, future mechanism studies and clinical trials are required for this optimization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The effectiveness of BM-MSCs on serum albumin.
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fig3: The effectiveness of BM-MSCs on serum albumin.

Mentions: Four [13, 16–18], four [13, 15, 17, 18], and three [12, 16, 17] studies assessed serum albumin 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after transplantations of BM-MSCs (Figure 3). Generally, BM-MSCs therapy was associated with significantly higher serum albumin at 1 month (WMD: 2.25, 95% CI: 0.97 to 3.54, P = 0.0006), 3 months (WMD: 2.45, 95% CI: −0.16 to 5.07, P = 0.07), and 6 months (WMD: 6.62, 95% CI: 4.29 to 8.95, P < 0.00001). However, significant heterogeneity was observed in the three groups (I2 = 51%, 83%, and 73%, resp.) (Figure 3). In months 1 and 6 measurement, all of the studies reported similar serum albumin increasing trend in BM-MSCs groups. The heterogeneity was mainly related to different level of positive outcome. However, in month 3 measurement, Mohamadnejad et al. [15] reported contracting results, which observed that BM-MSCs therapy was associated with decreased serum albumin. Exclusion of this study could decrease the heterogeneity to a nonsignificant level.


Transplantation of autologous mesenchymal stem cells for end-stage liver cirrhosis: a meta-analysis based on seven controlled trials.

Ma XR, Tang YL, Xuan M, Chang Z, Wang XY, Liang XH - Gastroenterol Res Pract (2015)

The effectiveness of BM-MSCs on serum albumin.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4377544&req=5

fig3: The effectiveness of BM-MSCs on serum albumin.
Mentions: Four [13, 16–18], four [13, 15, 17, 18], and three [12, 16, 17] studies assessed serum albumin 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after transplantations of BM-MSCs (Figure 3). Generally, BM-MSCs therapy was associated with significantly higher serum albumin at 1 month (WMD: 2.25, 95% CI: 0.97 to 3.54, P = 0.0006), 3 months (WMD: 2.45, 95% CI: −0.16 to 5.07, P = 0.07), and 6 months (WMD: 6.62, 95% CI: 4.29 to 8.95, P < 0.00001). However, significant heterogeneity was observed in the three groups (I2 = 51%, 83%, and 73%, resp.) (Figure 3). In months 1 and 6 measurement, all of the studies reported similar serum albumin increasing trend in BM-MSCs groups. The heterogeneity was mainly related to different level of positive outcome. However, in month 3 measurement, Mohamadnejad et al. [15] reported contracting results, which observed that BM-MSCs therapy was associated with decreased serum albumin. Exclusion of this study could decrease the heterogeneity to a nonsignificant level.

Bottom Line: The bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have demonstrated great potential as regenerative medicine in different therapeutic applications.Considering currently available evidence, this therapy is relatively safe and effective in improving liver function.However, how different variables should be controlled to optimize the therapeutic effect is still not clear.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, No. 14, 3rd Section, Renmin South Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, China.

ABSTRACT
Background. The bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have demonstrated great potential as regenerative medicine in different therapeutic applications. This study aims to pool previous controlled clinical trials to make an update assessment of the effectiveness of BM-MSC transplantation on end-stage liver cirrhosis. Methods. Relevant studies published between January 1990 and June 2014 were searched among Pubmed, Embase, and ClinicalTrial.gov. A meta-analysis was performed to assess the effect of BM-MSCs on liver function indicators, including Models of End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, serum albumin (g/L), total bilirubin (mg/dl), Prothrombin concentration (%), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (U/L). Results. BM-MSCs therapy could significantly improve liver function in patients with end-stage liver cirrhosis, in terms of MELD score, serum albumin, total bilirubin, and prothrombin concentration, at least during the half year after transplantation. Conclusions. Due to BM-MSCs' immunomodulatory functions and the potential to differentiate into hepatocytes, they are a promising therapeutic agent to liver cirrhosis. Considering currently available evidence, this therapy is relatively safe and effective in improving liver function. However, how different variables should be controlled to optimize the therapeutic effect is still not clear. Thus, future mechanism studies and clinical trials are required for this optimization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus