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Hyperplastic cardiac sarcoma recurrence.

Shariff MA, Abreu JA, Durrani F, Daniele E, Bowman KC, Sadel S, Asgarian KT, McGinn JT, Nabagiez JP - Case Rep Surg (2015)

Bottom Line: Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare tumors with a median survival of 6-12 months.Data suggest that an aggressive multidisciplinary approach may improve patient outcome.This report discusses the malignant nature of cardiac sarcoma and the importance of postoperative multidisciplinary care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Staten Island University Hospital, 475 Seaview Avenue, Staten Island, NY 10305, USA.

ABSTRACT
Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare tumors with a median survival of 6-12 months. Data suggest that an aggressive multidisciplinary approach may improve patient outcome. We present the case of a male who underwent resection of cardiac sarcoma three times from the age of 32 to 34. This report discusses the malignant nature of cardiac sarcoma and the importance of postoperative multidisciplinary care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Presentation 2. (a) MRI showing mass in the left side of the heart pressing on the mitral valve (arrow head) and two other masses in the left atrium indicated (asterisks). (b) TEE showing a mobile, echogenic mass (asterisk) in the left heart prolapsing through the mitral valve (arrow) into the ventricle. (c) Nongated CT-scan captured the mass (arrow) in motion in the left side of the heart. LA: left atrium. LV: left ventricle.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Presentation 2. (a) MRI showing mass in the left side of the heart pressing on the mitral valve (arrow head) and two other masses in the left atrium indicated (asterisks). (b) TEE showing a mobile, echogenic mass (asterisk) in the left heart prolapsing through the mitral valve (arrow) into the ventricle. (c) Nongated CT-scan captured the mass (arrow) in motion in the left side of the heart. LA: left atrium. LV: left ventricle.

Mentions: In September of 2009 the patient presented with shortness of breath, chest pain, and palpitations. He had not followed up with an oncologist due to financial hardship. CT and MRI scans revealed three lobular enhancing masses within the left atrium. The largest, measuring 3.5 × 2.6 cm, was attached to the lateral wall of the atrium and on the posterolateral leaflet of the mitral valve, protruding into the left ventricle with extension into the left inferior pulmonary vein. The second mass was broad based posteriorly near the origin of the left inferior pulmonary vein. The third mass was in the interatrial septum (Figure 1). Liver and pulmonary metastases were noted. TTE revealed the mass causing 2+ mitral regurgitation with normal valvular morphology and an ejection fraction of 50% (Figure 1).


Hyperplastic cardiac sarcoma recurrence.

Shariff MA, Abreu JA, Durrani F, Daniele E, Bowman KC, Sadel S, Asgarian KT, McGinn JT, Nabagiez JP - Case Rep Surg (2015)

Presentation 2. (a) MRI showing mass in the left side of the heart pressing on the mitral valve (arrow head) and two other masses in the left atrium indicated (asterisks). (b) TEE showing a mobile, echogenic mass (asterisk) in the left heart prolapsing through the mitral valve (arrow) into the ventricle. (c) Nongated CT-scan captured the mass (arrow) in motion in the left side of the heart. LA: left atrium. LV: left ventricle.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4377465&req=5

fig1: Presentation 2. (a) MRI showing mass in the left side of the heart pressing on the mitral valve (arrow head) and two other masses in the left atrium indicated (asterisks). (b) TEE showing a mobile, echogenic mass (asterisk) in the left heart prolapsing through the mitral valve (arrow) into the ventricle. (c) Nongated CT-scan captured the mass (arrow) in motion in the left side of the heart. LA: left atrium. LV: left ventricle.
Mentions: In September of 2009 the patient presented with shortness of breath, chest pain, and palpitations. He had not followed up with an oncologist due to financial hardship. CT and MRI scans revealed three lobular enhancing masses within the left atrium. The largest, measuring 3.5 × 2.6 cm, was attached to the lateral wall of the atrium and on the posterolateral leaflet of the mitral valve, protruding into the left ventricle with extension into the left inferior pulmonary vein. The second mass was broad based posteriorly near the origin of the left inferior pulmonary vein. The third mass was in the interatrial septum (Figure 1). Liver and pulmonary metastases were noted. TTE revealed the mass causing 2+ mitral regurgitation with normal valvular morphology and an ejection fraction of 50% (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare tumors with a median survival of 6-12 months.Data suggest that an aggressive multidisciplinary approach may improve patient outcome.This report discusses the malignant nature of cardiac sarcoma and the importance of postoperative multidisciplinary care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Staten Island University Hospital, 475 Seaview Avenue, Staten Island, NY 10305, USA.

ABSTRACT
Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare tumors with a median survival of 6-12 months. Data suggest that an aggressive multidisciplinary approach may improve patient outcome. We present the case of a male who underwent resection of cardiac sarcoma three times from the age of 32 to 34. This report discusses the malignant nature of cardiac sarcoma and the importance of postoperative multidisciplinary care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus