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Oxidative stress to the cornea, changes in corneal optical properties, and advances in treatment of corneal oxidative injuries.

Cejka C, Cejkova J - Oxid Med Cell Longev (2015)

Bottom Line: Oxidative stress is involved in many ocular diseases and injuries.The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases with particular attention to oxidative stress in the cornea and changes in corneal optical properties are discussed.Advances in the treatment of corneal oxidative injuries or diseases are shown.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Eye Histochemistry and Pharmacology, Department of Neuroscience, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vídeňská 1083, 14220 Prague 4, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Oxidative stress is involved in many ocular diseases and injuries. The imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants in favour of oxidants (oxidative stress) leads to the damage and may be highly involved in ocular aging processes. The anterior eye segment and mainly the cornea are directly exposed to noxae of external environment, such as air pollution, radiation, cigarette smoke, vapors or gases from household cleaning products, chemical burns from splashes of industrial chemicals, and danger from potential oxidative damage evoked by them. Oxidative stress may initiate or develop ocular injury resulting in decreased visual acuity or even vision loss. The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases with particular attention to oxidative stress in the cornea and changes in corneal optical properties are discussed. Advances in the treatment of corneal oxidative injuries or diseases are shown.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Averaged absorption spectra of rabbit corneas, expressed as the transmittance T = T(λ) or absorbance A = A(λ), after irradiation of the eye with UVB rays (312 nm) or UVA rays (365 nm), 1.0 J/cm(2) once daily for four days. The spectrum of unirradiated corneas (healthy eyes; mean from 12 measurements) is also included for comparison. Note that, for wavelengths shorter than about 300 nm, the spectra show the instrumental stray light error rather than the corneal optical properties (absorption spectra of rabbit corneas were obtained using a spectrophotometrical method described by Čejka et al. [22]). The increased corneal light absorption after UVB irradiation goes in parallel with the changed corneal transparency. The cornea is vascularized at the periphery. In contrast, a similar dose of UVA radiation did not significantly change corneal light absorption or corneal transparency.
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fig1: Averaged absorption spectra of rabbit corneas, expressed as the transmittance T = T(λ) or absorbance A = A(λ), after irradiation of the eye with UVB rays (312 nm) or UVA rays (365 nm), 1.0 J/cm(2) once daily for four days. The spectrum of unirradiated corneas (healthy eyes; mean from 12 measurements) is also included for comparison. Note that, for wavelengths shorter than about 300 nm, the spectra show the instrumental stray light error rather than the corneal optical properties (absorption spectra of rabbit corneas were obtained using a spectrophotometrical method described by Čejka et al. [22]). The increased corneal light absorption after UVB irradiation goes in parallel with the changed corneal transparency. The cornea is vascularized at the periphery. In contrast, a similar dose of UVA radiation did not significantly change corneal light absorption or corneal transparency.

Mentions: In experimental studies with the irradiation of the rabbit eye with UVB radiation or UVA radiation (daily dose of 1.01 J/cm(2) for four days) it was found that UVB radiation evoked the increase in corneal hydration and light absorption and initiated the intracorneal inflammation [22]. In contrast, UVA radiation of similar doses did not statistically significantly change the corneal hydration and light absorption properties from those seen in normal corneas. Similar findings were obtained with twofold higher UVA dose (daily dose of 2.02 J/cm(2) during five days). The thickness of the corneal centers after irradiation with UVA rays (both doses) was not significantly changed compared to normal corneas. The corneas remained transparent and undamaged [41]. In Figure 1 differences between the irradiation of the rabbit eye with UVB and UVA rays are shown.


Oxidative stress to the cornea, changes in corneal optical properties, and advances in treatment of corneal oxidative injuries.

Cejka C, Cejkova J - Oxid Med Cell Longev (2015)

Averaged absorption spectra of rabbit corneas, expressed as the transmittance T = T(λ) or absorbance A = A(λ), after irradiation of the eye with UVB rays (312 nm) or UVA rays (365 nm), 1.0 J/cm(2) once daily for four days. The spectrum of unirradiated corneas (healthy eyes; mean from 12 measurements) is also included for comparison. Note that, for wavelengths shorter than about 300 nm, the spectra show the instrumental stray light error rather than the corneal optical properties (absorption spectra of rabbit corneas were obtained using a spectrophotometrical method described by Čejka et al. [22]). The increased corneal light absorption after UVB irradiation goes in parallel with the changed corneal transparency. The cornea is vascularized at the periphery. In contrast, a similar dose of UVA radiation did not significantly change corneal light absorption or corneal transparency.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4377462&req=5

fig1: Averaged absorption spectra of rabbit corneas, expressed as the transmittance T = T(λ) or absorbance A = A(λ), after irradiation of the eye with UVB rays (312 nm) or UVA rays (365 nm), 1.0 J/cm(2) once daily for four days. The spectrum of unirradiated corneas (healthy eyes; mean from 12 measurements) is also included for comparison. Note that, for wavelengths shorter than about 300 nm, the spectra show the instrumental stray light error rather than the corneal optical properties (absorption spectra of rabbit corneas were obtained using a spectrophotometrical method described by Čejka et al. [22]). The increased corneal light absorption after UVB irradiation goes in parallel with the changed corneal transparency. The cornea is vascularized at the periphery. In contrast, a similar dose of UVA radiation did not significantly change corneal light absorption or corneal transparency.
Mentions: In experimental studies with the irradiation of the rabbit eye with UVB radiation or UVA radiation (daily dose of 1.01 J/cm(2) for four days) it was found that UVB radiation evoked the increase in corneal hydration and light absorption and initiated the intracorneal inflammation [22]. In contrast, UVA radiation of similar doses did not statistically significantly change the corneal hydration and light absorption properties from those seen in normal corneas. Similar findings were obtained with twofold higher UVA dose (daily dose of 2.02 J/cm(2) during five days). The thickness of the corneal centers after irradiation with UVA rays (both doses) was not significantly changed compared to normal corneas. The corneas remained transparent and undamaged [41]. In Figure 1 differences between the irradiation of the rabbit eye with UVB and UVA rays are shown.

Bottom Line: Oxidative stress is involved in many ocular diseases and injuries.The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases with particular attention to oxidative stress in the cornea and changes in corneal optical properties are discussed.Advances in the treatment of corneal oxidative injuries or diseases are shown.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Eye Histochemistry and Pharmacology, Department of Neuroscience, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vídeňská 1083, 14220 Prague 4, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Oxidative stress is involved in many ocular diseases and injuries. The imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants in favour of oxidants (oxidative stress) leads to the damage and may be highly involved in ocular aging processes. The anterior eye segment and mainly the cornea are directly exposed to noxae of external environment, such as air pollution, radiation, cigarette smoke, vapors or gases from household cleaning products, chemical burns from splashes of industrial chemicals, and danger from potential oxidative damage evoked by them. Oxidative stress may initiate or develop ocular injury resulting in decreased visual acuity or even vision loss. The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases with particular attention to oxidative stress in the cornea and changes in corneal optical properties are discussed. Advances in the treatment of corneal oxidative injuries or diseases are shown.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus