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A rare cause of colonic obstruction "colonic intussusception": report of two cases.

Yoldas T, Karaca AC, Ozturk S, Unver M, Calıskan C, Korkut MA - Case Rep Surg (2015)

Bottom Line: Mostly being malignant, the leading lesions are rarely benign lesions where intraluminal lipomas are the most frequent among them.Most adult intussusceptions require surgical resection owing to two major reasons: common presence of a leading lesion and significantly high risk of malignancy-reaching as high as 65% regardless of the anatomic site-of the leading lesion.This paper represents two cases of adult colocolic intussusception caused by intraluminal lipomas with a brief review of the literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Ege University Faculty of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Colocolic intussusceptions are rare clinical entities in adults and almost always caused by a leading lesion which often warrants resection. Mostly being malignant, the leading lesions are rarely benign lesions where intraluminal lipomas are the most frequent among them. Most adult intussusceptions require surgical resection owing to two major reasons: common presence of a leading lesion and significantly high risk of malignancy-reaching as high as 65% regardless of the anatomic site-of the leading lesion. Resection of the affected segment is usually the treatment of choice, since preoperative diagnosis of the lesion is usually ineffective and most leading lesions are malignant. This paper represents two cases of adult colocolic intussusception caused by intraluminal lipomas with a brief review of the literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Tomographic view of the intussuscepted transverse colon.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Tomographic view of the intussuscepted transverse colon.

Mentions: Further examination with abdominal tomography revealed diffuse thickening of the transverse colon wall along a 9 cm segment and colocolic intussusception (Figure 1). Endoscopic examination clearly visualized intraluminal fatty lesion leading to intussusception in the distal segments of the transverse colon accompanied with nonnecrotizing intussusception.


A rare cause of colonic obstruction "colonic intussusception": report of two cases.

Yoldas T, Karaca AC, Ozturk S, Unver M, Calıskan C, Korkut MA - Case Rep Surg (2015)

Tomographic view of the intussuscepted transverse colon.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4377455&req=5

fig1: Tomographic view of the intussuscepted transverse colon.
Mentions: Further examination with abdominal tomography revealed diffuse thickening of the transverse colon wall along a 9 cm segment and colocolic intussusception (Figure 1). Endoscopic examination clearly visualized intraluminal fatty lesion leading to intussusception in the distal segments of the transverse colon accompanied with nonnecrotizing intussusception.

Bottom Line: Mostly being malignant, the leading lesions are rarely benign lesions where intraluminal lipomas are the most frequent among them.Most adult intussusceptions require surgical resection owing to two major reasons: common presence of a leading lesion and significantly high risk of malignancy-reaching as high as 65% regardless of the anatomic site-of the leading lesion.This paper represents two cases of adult colocolic intussusception caused by intraluminal lipomas with a brief review of the literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Ege University Faculty of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Colocolic intussusceptions are rare clinical entities in adults and almost always caused by a leading lesion which often warrants resection. Mostly being malignant, the leading lesions are rarely benign lesions where intraluminal lipomas are the most frequent among them. Most adult intussusceptions require surgical resection owing to two major reasons: common presence of a leading lesion and significantly high risk of malignancy-reaching as high as 65% regardless of the anatomic site-of the leading lesion. Resection of the affected segment is usually the treatment of choice, since preoperative diagnosis of the lesion is usually ineffective and most leading lesions are malignant. This paper represents two cases of adult colocolic intussusception caused by intraluminal lipomas with a brief review of the literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus