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Analysis of the Results from the Patch Test to Para-Phenylenediamine in the TRUE Test in Patients with a Hair Dye Contact Allergy.

Lee JY, Kim CW, Kim SS - Ann Dermatol (2015)

Bottom Line: Although there was a significant correlation between HDCA and PPD sensitization (p=0.001), only 40% of the patients with HDCA showed positive reactions to PPD.This study's findings show that PPD is an effective HDCA marker.However, we propose that investigations on hair dye components other than PPD should be conducted to develop and validate additional predictive HDCA markers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Para-phenylenediamine (PPD) is the primary patch test screening agent for hair dye contact allergy (HDCA). However, no recent studies have been published that describe the results of reactions to patch tests using PPD and hair dyes in Korea.

Objective: To analyze the results of the patch tests to PPD using the thin-layer rapid use epicutaneous (TRUE) Test system in patients with HDCA and to investigate patients' awareness that hair dyes contains allergens, which cause the development of HDCA.

Methods: Eighty-four patients with suspected HDCA (32 men and 52 women) underwent patch testing using the TRUE Test system and their own hair dyes. The patients' demographic data, behavior associated with hair dyeing, and clinical manifestations of HDCA were examined retrospectively.

Results: Positive patch-test reactions to hair dyes occurred in 53.6% of patients who used hair dyes, and they were diagnosed with HDCA. Although there was a significant correlation between HDCA and PPD sensitization (p=0.001), only 40% of the patients with HDCA showed positive reactions to PPD. Of the 45 patients diagnosed with HDCA, only 7 (15.6%) were aware that their hair dyes contained allergens that caused HDCA.

Conclusion: This study's findings show that PPD is an effective HDCA marker. However, we propose that investigations on hair dye components other than PPD should be conducted to develop and validate additional predictive HDCA markers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Clinical symptoms associated with skin lesions in patients with a hair dye contact allergy.
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Figure 3: Clinical symptoms associated with skin lesions in patients with a hair dye contact allergy.

Mentions: Among the 45 subjects diagnosed with HDCA, the forehead was the most common location for an allergic reaction (33 subjects, 73.3%), followed by the eyes (32 subjects, 71.1%) and the ears (31 subjects, 68.9%) (Fig. 2). Although the scalp is the area in which hair dyes have the greatest direct contact, this area showed a lower frequency as a location for allergic reactions (27 subjects, 60.0%) compared to the aforementioned areas (Table 3). The most common clinical symptom associated with HDCA was pruritus (44 subjects, 97.8%) followed by eczema (42 subjects, 93.3%) (Fig. 3). Of the 45 subjects who were diagnosed with HDCA, only 7 (15.6%) were aware that hair dyes are allergenic. Associations between the patients' awareness that hair dyes contain allergens and the presence of pruritus, eczema, ulcers, and edema were analyzed; however, no statistically significant results were obtained (Table 4). This suggests that regardless of the clinical symptoms, most of the patients with HDCA were not aware that their hair dyes are allergenic.


Analysis of the Results from the Patch Test to Para-Phenylenediamine in the TRUE Test in Patients with a Hair Dye Contact Allergy.

Lee JY, Kim CW, Kim SS - Ann Dermatol (2015)

Clinical symptoms associated with skin lesions in patients with a hair dye contact allergy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4377406&req=5

Figure 3: Clinical symptoms associated with skin lesions in patients with a hair dye contact allergy.
Mentions: Among the 45 subjects diagnosed with HDCA, the forehead was the most common location for an allergic reaction (33 subjects, 73.3%), followed by the eyes (32 subjects, 71.1%) and the ears (31 subjects, 68.9%) (Fig. 2). Although the scalp is the area in which hair dyes have the greatest direct contact, this area showed a lower frequency as a location for allergic reactions (27 subjects, 60.0%) compared to the aforementioned areas (Table 3). The most common clinical symptom associated with HDCA was pruritus (44 subjects, 97.8%) followed by eczema (42 subjects, 93.3%) (Fig. 3). Of the 45 subjects who were diagnosed with HDCA, only 7 (15.6%) were aware that hair dyes are allergenic. Associations between the patients' awareness that hair dyes contain allergens and the presence of pruritus, eczema, ulcers, and edema were analyzed; however, no statistically significant results were obtained (Table 4). This suggests that regardless of the clinical symptoms, most of the patients with HDCA were not aware that their hair dyes are allergenic.

Bottom Line: Although there was a significant correlation between HDCA and PPD sensitization (p=0.001), only 40% of the patients with HDCA showed positive reactions to PPD.This study's findings show that PPD is an effective HDCA marker.However, we propose that investigations on hair dye components other than PPD should be conducted to develop and validate additional predictive HDCA markers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Para-phenylenediamine (PPD) is the primary patch test screening agent for hair dye contact allergy (HDCA). However, no recent studies have been published that describe the results of reactions to patch tests using PPD and hair dyes in Korea.

Objective: To analyze the results of the patch tests to PPD using the thin-layer rapid use epicutaneous (TRUE) Test system in patients with HDCA and to investigate patients' awareness that hair dyes contains allergens, which cause the development of HDCA.

Methods: Eighty-four patients with suspected HDCA (32 men and 52 women) underwent patch testing using the TRUE Test system and their own hair dyes. The patients' demographic data, behavior associated with hair dyeing, and clinical manifestations of HDCA were examined retrospectively.

Results: Positive patch-test reactions to hair dyes occurred in 53.6% of patients who used hair dyes, and they were diagnosed with HDCA. Although there was a significant correlation between HDCA and PPD sensitization (p=0.001), only 40% of the patients with HDCA showed positive reactions to PPD. Of the 45 patients diagnosed with HDCA, only 7 (15.6%) were aware that their hair dyes contained allergens that caused HDCA.

Conclusion: This study's findings show that PPD is an effective HDCA marker. However, we propose that investigations on hair dye components other than PPD should be conducted to develop and validate additional predictive HDCA markers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus