Limits...
A practical approach to imaging the axilla.

Dialani V, James DF, Slanetz PJ - Insights Imaging (2014)

Bottom Line: An awareness of the axillary anatomy is essential in order to generate an accurate differential diagnosis and guide patient management.The purpose of this article is to review the indications for axillary imaging, discuss the logistics of the scanning technique and percutaneous interventions, and present the imaging findings and management of a variety of breast diseases involving the axilla.Teaching points • Knowledge of normal axillary anatomy aids in determining the aetiology of an axillary mass. • The differential diagnosis of an axillary mass is broad and can be subdivided by the location of the lesion. • Imaging evaluation of the axilla usually entails diagnostic mammography and targeted ultrasound. • FNA or core needle biopsies are safe and accurate methods for diagnosis and guiding management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, USA, vdialani@bidmc.harvard.edu.

ABSTRACT
Imaging of the axilla typically occurs when patients present with axillary symptoms or newly diagnosed breast cancer. An awareness of the axillary anatomy is essential in order to generate an accurate differential diagnosis and guide patient management. The purpose of this article is to review the indications for axillary imaging, discuss the logistics of the scanning technique and percutaneous interventions, and present the imaging findings and management of a variety of breast diseases involving the axilla. Teaching points • Knowledge of normal axillary anatomy aids in determining the aetiology of an axillary mass. • The differential diagnosis of an axillary mass is broad and can be subdivided by the location of the lesion. • Imaging evaluation of the axilla usually entails diagnostic mammography and targeted ultrasound. • FNA or core needle biopsies are safe and accurate methods for diagnosis and guiding management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A 80-year-old female with a history of sarcoidosis presenting with a left axillary mass 1 year following axillary surgery of a benign node. a MLO view and (b) ultrasound of the left axilla demonstrates a 4.1 × 2.7 × 3.5-cm well-circumscribed predominantly anechoic structure with internal debris consistent with a complicated cyst. Aspiration was performed for symptomatic relief. Final diagnosis: lymphocele of the left breast demonstrates extensive skin and trabecular thickening and a well-circumscribed left axillary mass
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4376818&req=5

Fig12: A 80-year-old female with a history of sarcoidosis presenting with a left axillary mass 1 year following axillary surgery of a benign node. a MLO view and (b) ultrasound of the left axilla demonstrates a 4.1 × 2.7 × 3.5-cm well-circumscribed predominantly anechoic structure with internal debris consistent with a complicated cyst. Aspiration was performed for symptomatic relief. Final diagnosis: lymphocele of the left breast demonstrates extensive skin and trabecular thickening and a well-circumscribed left axillary mass

Mentions: Following axillary surgery, an array of findings can be seen in the axilla. The most common findings include skin and trabecular thickening (Fig. 11), post-operative fluid collections/lymphoceles (Fig. 12), fat necrosis and recurrence.Fig. 11


A practical approach to imaging the axilla.

Dialani V, James DF, Slanetz PJ - Insights Imaging (2014)

A 80-year-old female with a history of sarcoidosis presenting with a left axillary mass 1 year following axillary surgery of a benign node. a MLO view and (b) ultrasound of the left axilla demonstrates a 4.1 × 2.7 × 3.5-cm well-circumscribed predominantly anechoic structure with internal debris consistent with a complicated cyst. Aspiration was performed for symptomatic relief. Final diagnosis: lymphocele of the left breast demonstrates extensive skin and trabecular thickening and a well-circumscribed left axillary mass
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4376818&req=5

Fig12: A 80-year-old female with a history of sarcoidosis presenting with a left axillary mass 1 year following axillary surgery of a benign node. a MLO view and (b) ultrasound of the left axilla demonstrates a 4.1 × 2.7 × 3.5-cm well-circumscribed predominantly anechoic structure with internal debris consistent with a complicated cyst. Aspiration was performed for symptomatic relief. Final diagnosis: lymphocele of the left breast demonstrates extensive skin and trabecular thickening and a well-circumscribed left axillary mass
Mentions: Following axillary surgery, an array of findings can be seen in the axilla. The most common findings include skin and trabecular thickening (Fig. 11), post-operative fluid collections/lymphoceles (Fig. 12), fat necrosis and recurrence.Fig. 11

Bottom Line: An awareness of the axillary anatomy is essential in order to generate an accurate differential diagnosis and guide patient management.The purpose of this article is to review the indications for axillary imaging, discuss the logistics of the scanning technique and percutaneous interventions, and present the imaging findings and management of a variety of breast diseases involving the axilla.Teaching points • Knowledge of normal axillary anatomy aids in determining the aetiology of an axillary mass. • The differential diagnosis of an axillary mass is broad and can be subdivided by the location of the lesion. • Imaging evaluation of the axilla usually entails diagnostic mammography and targeted ultrasound. • FNA or core needle biopsies are safe and accurate methods for diagnosis and guiding management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, USA, vdialani@bidmc.harvard.edu.

ABSTRACT
Imaging of the axilla typically occurs when patients present with axillary symptoms or newly diagnosed breast cancer. An awareness of the axillary anatomy is essential in order to generate an accurate differential diagnosis and guide patient management. The purpose of this article is to review the indications for axillary imaging, discuss the logistics of the scanning technique and percutaneous interventions, and present the imaging findings and management of a variety of breast diseases involving the axilla. Teaching points • Knowledge of normal axillary anatomy aids in determining the aetiology of an axillary mass. • The differential diagnosis of an axillary mass is broad and can be subdivided by the location of the lesion. • Imaging evaluation of the axilla usually entails diagnostic mammography and targeted ultrasound. • FNA or core needle biopsies are safe and accurate methods for diagnosis and guiding management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus