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Passion fruit juice with different sweeteners: sensory profile by descriptive analysis and acceptance.

Rocha IF, Bolini HM - Food Sci Nutr (2015)

Bottom Line: Passion fruit flavor affected positively and sweet aftertaste affected negatively the acceptance of the samples.Samples sweetened with aspartame, sucralose, and sucrose presented higher acceptance scores for the attributes flavor, texture, and overall impression, with no significant (P < 0.05) differences between them.Aspartame and sucralose can be good substitutes for sucrose in passion fruit juice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Food Engineering, Food and Nutrition Department, University of Campinas R. Monteiro Lobato 80, 6121, Campinas, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
This study evaluated the effect of different sweeteners on the sensory profile, acceptance, and drivers of preference of passion fruit juice samples sweetened with sucrose, aspartame, sucralose, stevia, cyclamate/saccharin blend 2:1, and neotame. Sensory profiling was performed by 12 trained assessors using quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA). Acceptance tests (appearance, aroma, flavor, texture and overall impression) were performed with 124 consumers of tropical fruit juice. Samples with sucrose, aspartame and sucralose showed similar sensory profile (P < 0.05), without bitter taste, bitter aftertaste, and metallic taste, and samples with sucrose and sucralose did not differ from each other for the attribute sweet aftertaste. Passion fruit flavor affected positively and sweet aftertaste affected negatively the acceptance of the samples. Samples sweetened with aspartame, sucralose, and sucrose presented higher acceptance scores for the attributes flavor, texture, and overall impression, with no significant (P < 0.05) differences between them. Aspartame and sucralose can be good substitutes for sucrose in passion fruit juice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

PCA generated with the sensory data for appearance, aroma, flavor, and texture.
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fig01: PCA generated with the sensory data for appearance, aroma, flavor, and texture.

Mentions: Figure1 shows the results for the PCA to illustrate the similarities and differences amongst the passion fruit juice samples with respect to their attributes.


Passion fruit juice with different sweeteners: sensory profile by descriptive analysis and acceptance.

Rocha IF, Bolini HM - Food Sci Nutr (2015)

PCA generated with the sensory data for appearance, aroma, flavor, and texture.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4376407&req=5

fig01: PCA generated with the sensory data for appearance, aroma, flavor, and texture.
Mentions: Figure1 shows the results for the PCA to illustrate the similarities and differences amongst the passion fruit juice samples with respect to their attributes.

Bottom Line: Passion fruit flavor affected positively and sweet aftertaste affected negatively the acceptance of the samples.Samples sweetened with aspartame, sucralose, and sucrose presented higher acceptance scores for the attributes flavor, texture, and overall impression, with no significant (P < 0.05) differences between them.Aspartame and sucralose can be good substitutes for sucrose in passion fruit juice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Food Engineering, Food and Nutrition Department, University of Campinas R. Monteiro Lobato 80, 6121, Campinas, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
This study evaluated the effect of different sweeteners on the sensory profile, acceptance, and drivers of preference of passion fruit juice samples sweetened with sucrose, aspartame, sucralose, stevia, cyclamate/saccharin blend 2:1, and neotame. Sensory profiling was performed by 12 trained assessors using quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA). Acceptance tests (appearance, aroma, flavor, texture and overall impression) were performed with 124 consumers of tropical fruit juice. Samples with sucrose, aspartame and sucralose showed similar sensory profile (P < 0.05), without bitter taste, bitter aftertaste, and metallic taste, and samples with sucrose and sucralose did not differ from each other for the attribute sweet aftertaste. Passion fruit flavor affected positively and sweet aftertaste affected negatively the acceptance of the samples. Samples sweetened with aspartame, sucralose, and sucrose presented higher acceptance scores for the attributes flavor, texture, and overall impression, with no significant (P < 0.05) differences between them. Aspartame and sucralose can be good substitutes for sucrose in passion fruit juice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus