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Thermo-optical characterization of fluorescent rhodamine B based temperature-sensitive nanosensors using a CMOS MEMS micro-hotplate.

Chauhan VM, Hopper RH, Ali SZ, King EM, Udrea F, Oxley CH, Aylott JW - Sens Actuators B Chem (2014)

Bottom Line: The fluorescence response of all nanosensors dispersed across the surface of the MEMS device was found to decrease in an exponential manner by 94%, when the temperature was increased from 25 °C to 145 °C.The MEMS device used for this study could prove to be a reliable, low cost, low power and high temperature micro-hotplate for the thermo-optical characterisation of sub-micron sized particles.The temperature-sensitive nanosensors could find potential application in the measurement of temperature in biological and micro-electrical systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Biophysics and Surface Analysis, School of Pharmacy, University of Nottingham, Boots Science Building, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK.

ABSTRACT

A custom designed microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) micro-hotplate, capable of operating at high temperatures (up to 700 °C), was used to thermo-optically characterize fluorescent temperature-sensitive nanosensors. The nanosensors, 550 nm in diameter, are composed of temperature-sensitive rhodamine B (RhB) fluorophore which was conjugated to an inert silica sol-gel matrix. Temperature-sensitive nanosensors were dispersed and dried across the surface of the MEMS micro-hotplate, which was mounted in the slide holder of a fluorescence confocal microscope. Through electrical control of the MEMS micro-hotplate, temperature induced changes in fluorescence intensity of the nanosensors was measured over a wide temperature range. The fluorescence response of all nanosensors dispersed across the surface of the MEMS device was found to decrease in an exponential manner by 94%, when the temperature was increased from 25 °C to 145 °C. The fluorescence response of all dispersed nanosensors across the whole surface of the MEMS device and individual nanosensors, using line profile analysis, were not statistically different (p < 0.05). The MEMS device used for this study could prove to be a reliable, low cost, low power and high temperature micro-hotplate for the thermo-optical characterisation of sub-micron sized particles. The temperature-sensitive nanosensors could find potential application in the measurement of temperature in biological and micro-electrical systems.

No MeSH data available.


Fluorescence images of temperature-sensitive nanosensors, dispersed on the surface of MEMS micro-hotplate, between 25 ̊C and 145 ̊C. Scale bar = 50 μm.
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fig0025: Fluorescence images of temperature-sensitive nanosensors, dispersed on the surface of MEMS micro-hotplate, between 25 ̊C and 145 ̊C. Scale bar = 50 μm.

Mentions: The fluorescence response of temperature-sensitive nanosensors decreases as the temperature of the MEMS micro-hotplate is increased from 25 °C to 145 °C, Fig. 5. Over this temperature range the fluorescence response of all nanosensors, dispersed over the whole surface of the MEMS micro-hotplate, falls in an exponential manner by 94% at 145 °C, Fig. 6. This fluorescence response was found to be reversible when cycling the temperature from high to low (see supporting information, Fig. S2).


Thermo-optical characterization of fluorescent rhodamine B based temperature-sensitive nanosensors using a CMOS MEMS micro-hotplate.

Chauhan VM, Hopper RH, Ali SZ, King EM, Udrea F, Oxley CH, Aylott JW - Sens Actuators B Chem (2014)

Fluorescence images of temperature-sensitive nanosensors, dispersed on the surface of MEMS micro-hotplate, between 25 ̊C and 145 ̊C. Scale bar = 50 μm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4376176&req=5

fig0025: Fluorescence images of temperature-sensitive nanosensors, dispersed on the surface of MEMS micro-hotplate, between 25 ̊C and 145 ̊C. Scale bar = 50 μm.
Mentions: The fluorescence response of temperature-sensitive nanosensors decreases as the temperature of the MEMS micro-hotplate is increased from 25 °C to 145 °C, Fig. 5. Over this temperature range the fluorescence response of all nanosensors, dispersed over the whole surface of the MEMS micro-hotplate, falls in an exponential manner by 94% at 145 °C, Fig. 6. This fluorescence response was found to be reversible when cycling the temperature from high to low (see supporting information, Fig. S2).

Bottom Line: The fluorescence response of all nanosensors dispersed across the surface of the MEMS device was found to decrease in an exponential manner by 94%, when the temperature was increased from 25 °C to 145 °C.The MEMS device used for this study could prove to be a reliable, low cost, low power and high temperature micro-hotplate for the thermo-optical characterisation of sub-micron sized particles.The temperature-sensitive nanosensors could find potential application in the measurement of temperature in biological and micro-electrical systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Biophysics and Surface Analysis, School of Pharmacy, University of Nottingham, Boots Science Building, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK.

ABSTRACT

A custom designed microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) micro-hotplate, capable of operating at high temperatures (up to 700 °C), was used to thermo-optically characterize fluorescent temperature-sensitive nanosensors. The nanosensors, 550 nm in diameter, are composed of temperature-sensitive rhodamine B (RhB) fluorophore which was conjugated to an inert silica sol-gel matrix. Temperature-sensitive nanosensors were dispersed and dried across the surface of the MEMS micro-hotplate, which was mounted in the slide holder of a fluorescence confocal microscope. Through electrical control of the MEMS micro-hotplate, temperature induced changes in fluorescence intensity of the nanosensors was measured over a wide temperature range. The fluorescence response of all nanosensors dispersed across the surface of the MEMS device was found to decrease in an exponential manner by 94%, when the temperature was increased from 25 °C to 145 °C. The fluorescence response of all dispersed nanosensors across the whole surface of the MEMS device and individual nanosensors, using line profile analysis, were not statistically different (p < 0.05). The MEMS device used for this study could prove to be a reliable, low cost, low power and high temperature micro-hotplate for the thermo-optical characterisation of sub-micron sized particles. The temperature-sensitive nanosensors could find potential application in the measurement of temperature in biological and micro-electrical systems.

No MeSH data available.