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Disability-adjusted life years lost due to diabetes in France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and the United Kingdom: a burden of illness study.

Darbà J, Kaskens L, Detournay B, Kern W, Nicolucci A, Orozco-Beltrán D, Ramírez de Arellano A - Clinicoecon Outcomes Res (2015)

Bottom Line: No age weighting and discounting was applied.Mean DALYs lost were higher for women in Germany, Italy, and Spain and shown to increase with age for all countries.Sensitivity analysis in variation in disability weights and uncertainty in epidemiological data were shown to have effects on DALYs lost.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Economics, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Aims: To compare the burden of disease (BoD) attributable to diabetes expressed in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for five European countries in 2010.

Methods: DALYs lost to diabetes as the sum of years of life lost and years lived with disability were estimated by sex and age using country-specific epidemiological data and global disability weights. Data from various secondary sources were combined to estimate health loss due to diabetes for France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK. National statistical databases were used and if necessary, community studies were used to derive the prevalence of diabetes by sex and age group, which were weighted proportionately for a national population burden of disease estimate. All identified data were adapted to the Global Burden of Disease methodology (2010) to calculate the burden attributable to diabetes. No age weighting and discounting was applied. Sensitivity to different sources of variation was examined. Germany and Italy lost the largest number of DALYs due to diabetes, with 5.9 and 5.8 per 1,000 inhabitants, respectively, followed by Spain (4.4), France (3.7), and the UK (2.9). The highest burden was caused by mortality due to diabetes, with the exception of the UK, for which the burden due to disability of diabetes was higher. Mean DALYs lost were higher for women in Germany, Italy, and Spain and shown to increase with age for all countries. Sensitivity analysis in variation in disability weights and uncertainty in epidemiological data were shown to have effects on DALYs lost.

Conclusion: In spite of data limitations, the estimates reported here show that DALY loss due to diabetes imposes a substantial burden on countries. Cross-national variation in disease epidemiology was the largest source of variation in the burden of diabetes between countries.

No MeSH data available.


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Male mortality rates by age group in 2010.
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f1-ceor-7-163: Male mortality rates by age group in 2010.

Mentions: The demographic data on deaths caused by diabetes from France,31 Germany,32 Italy,33 Spain,34 and the UK35 were obtained. Diabetes mortality rates were obtained by using the number of deaths due to diabetes relative to the total population. Figures 1 and 2 contain estimations of mortality due to diabetes for men and women, respectively. In case of men’s mortality, there is an increasing pattern from age range 55–64 years onwards. Differences across countries are clear: the UK had the lowest mortality rate while France is the second best-off; the mortality rates for France were two times higher than the UK rates. At the age range 75+ years, Germany and Spain had very similar mortality rates. By far the highest value was for Italy, where more than 250 out of 100,000 men aged 75 years and over died from diabetes in 2010.


Disability-adjusted life years lost due to diabetes in France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and the United Kingdom: a burden of illness study.

Darbà J, Kaskens L, Detournay B, Kern W, Nicolucci A, Orozco-Beltrán D, Ramírez de Arellano A - Clinicoecon Outcomes Res (2015)

Male mortality rates by age group in 2010.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4376119&req=5

f1-ceor-7-163: Male mortality rates by age group in 2010.
Mentions: The demographic data on deaths caused by diabetes from France,31 Germany,32 Italy,33 Spain,34 and the UK35 were obtained. Diabetes mortality rates were obtained by using the number of deaths due to diabetes relative to the total population. Figures 1 and 2 contain estimations of mortality due to diabetes for men and women, respectively. In case of men’s mortality, there is an increasing pattern from age range 55–64 years onwards. Differences across countries are clear: the UK had the lowest mortality rate while France is the second best-off; the mortality rates for France were two times higher than the UK rates. At the age range 75+ years, Germany and Spain had very similar mortality rates. By far the highest value was for Italy, where more than 250 out of 100,000 men aged 75 years and over died from diabetes in 2010.

Bottom Line: No age weighting and discounting was applied.Mean DALYs lost were higher for women in Germany, Italy, and Spain and shown to increase with age for all countries.Sensitivity analysis in variation in disability weights and uncertainty in epidemiological data were shown to have effects on DALYs lost.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Economics, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Aims: To compare the burden of disease (BoD) attributable to diabetes expressed in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for five European countries in 2010.

Methods: DALYs lost to diabetes as the sum of years of life lost and years lived with disability were estimated by sex and age using country-specific epidemiological data and global disability weights. Data from various secondary sources were combined to estimate health loss due to diabetes for France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK. National statistical databases were used and if necessary, community studies were used to derive the prevalence of diabetes by sex and age group, which were weighted proportionately for a national population burden of disease estimate. All identified data were adapted to the Global Burden of Disease methodology (2010) to calculate the burden attributable to diabetes. No age weighting and discounting was applied. Sensitivity to different sources of variation was examined. Germany and Italy lost the largest number of DALYs due to diabetes, with 5.9 and 5.8 per 1,000 inhabitants, respectively, followed by Spain (4.4), France (3.7), and the UK (2.9). The highest burden was caused by mortality due to diabetes, with the exception of the UK, for which the burden due to disability of diabetes was higher. Mean DALYs lost were higher for women in Germany, Italy, and Spain and shown to increase with age for all countries. Sensitivity analysis in variation in disability weights and uncertainty in epidemiological data were shown to have effects on DALYs lost.

Conclusion: In spite of data limitations, the estimates reported here show that DALY loss due to diabetes imposes a substantial burden on countries. Cross-national variation in disease epidemiology was the largest source of variation in the burden of diabetes between countries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus