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The way you say it, the way I feel it: emotional word processing in accented speech.

Hatzidaki A, Baus C, Costa A - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: The behavioral results yielded longer latencies for emotional than for neutral words in both native and foreign-accented speech, with no difference between positive and negative words.The electrophysiological results replicated previous findings from the emotional language literature, with the amplitude of the Late Positive Complex (LPC), associated with emotional language processing, being larger (more positive) for emotional than for neutral words at posterior scalp sites.It shows that higher order semantic processes that involve emotion-related aspects are sensitive to a speaker's accent.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center of Brain and Cognition, Universitat Pompeu Fabra Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
The present study examined whether processing words with affective connotations in a listener's native language may be modulated by accented speech. To address this question, we used the Event Related Potential (ERP) technique and recorded the cerebral activity of Spanish native listeners, who performed a semantic categorization task, while listening to positive, negative and neutral words produced in standard Spanish or in four foreign accents. The behavioral results yielded longer latencies for emotional than for neutral words in both native and foreign-accented speech, with no difference between positive and negative words. The electrophysiological results replicated previous findings from the emotional language literature, with the amplitude of the Late Positive Complex (LPC), associated with emotional language processing, being larger (more positive) for emotional than for neutral words at posterior scalp sites. Interestingly, foreign-accented speech was found to interfere with the processing of positive valence and go along with a negativity bias, possibly suggesting heightened attention to negative words. The manipulation employed in the present study provides an interesting perspective on the effects of accented speech on processing affective-laden information. It shows that higher order semantic processes that involve emotion-related aspects are sensitive to a speaker's accent.

No MeSH data available.


Percentage (%) of categorical responses for each word of each valence type in each accent group.
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Figure 1: Percentage (%) of categorical responses for each word of each valence type in each accent group.

Mentions: Moreover, we examined the internal consistency of responses to compare the groups' performance for each stimulus at a conceptual—perceptual level. As it is clear in Figure 1, both groups' responses were all in the same direction. That is, a word that was considered “touchable” by the native accent group was also considered “touchable” by the foreign accent group and vice versa. Hence consistency of responses suggested similar conceptual and perceptual categorization across the two groups.


The way you say it, the way I feel it: emotional word processing in accented speech.

Hatzidaki A, Baus C, Costa A - Front Psychol (2015)

Percentage (%) of categorical responses for each word of each valence type in each accent group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4376116&req=5

Figure 1: Percentage (%) of categorical responses for each word of each valence type in each accent group.
Mentions: Moreover, we examined the internal consistency of responses to compare the groups' performance for each stimulus at a conceptual—perceptual level. As it is clear in Figure 1, both groups' responses were all in the same direction. That is, a word that was considered “touchable” by the native accent group was also considered “touchable” by the foreign accent group and vice versa. Hence consistency of responses suggested similar conceptual and perceptual categorization across the two groups.

Bottom Line: The behavioral results yielded longer latencies for emotional than for neutral words in both native and foreign-accented speech, with no difference between positive and negative words.The electrophysiological results replicated previous findings from the emotional language literature, with the amplitude of the Late Positive Complex (LPC), associated with emotional language processing, being larger (more positive) for emotional than for neutral words at posterior scalp sites.It shows that higher order semantic processes that involve emotion-related aspects are sensitive to a speaker's accent.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center of Brain and Cognition, Universitat Pompeu Fabra Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
The present study examined whether processing words with affective connotations in a listener's native language may be modulated by accented speech. To address this question, we used the Event Related Potential (ERP) technique and recorded the cerebral activity of Spanish native listeners, who performed a semantic categorization task, while listening to positive, negative and neutral words produced in standard Spanish or in four foreign accents. The behavioral results yielded longer latencies for emotional than for neutral words in both native and foreign-accented speech, with no difference between positive and negative words. The electrophysiological results replicated previous findings from the emotional language literature, with the amplitude of the Late Positive Complex (LPC), associated with emotional language processing, being larger (more positive) for emotional than for neutral words at posterior scalp sites. Interestingly, foreign-accented speech was found to interfere with the processing of positive valence and go along with a negativity bias, possibly suggesting heightened attention to negative words. The manipulation employed in the present study provides an interesting perspective on the effects of accented speech on processing affective-laden information. It shows that higher order semantic processes that involve emotion-related aspects are sensitive to a speaker's accent.

No MeSH data available.