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Submuscular lipoma of the forehead.

Neches SK, Parcells AL, Feintisch AM, Granick MS - Eplasty (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Plastic Surgery, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark.

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Common forehead masses include dermoid cysts, hemangiomas, lipomas, epidermal inclusion cysts, and osteomas... Lipomas are the most common tumor of mesenchymal origin, and frontalis-associated lipomas are based on 4 subtypes: intramuscular, arising from within the frontalis muscle of the forehead; submuscular, between the frontalis and its deep investing fascia (galea); subgaleal, between the galea and the periosteum; and subperiosteal... These masses are most commonly found in men 40 to 70 years old... While these lesions may be managed by observation, the forehead is a cosmetically sensitive area and most patients elect for surgical excision... A minimally invasive endoscopic approach has been described for subcutaneous lipomas to reduce scarring, avoid injury to the supraorbital and supratrochlear neurovascular bundles, and reduce postoperative pain... For deeper frontalis-associated lipomas, direct en bloc resection is often required to successfully excise the tumor... Our patient underwent direct surgical excision... The skin was incised transversely through forehead rhytid and the dissection directed to the frontalis muscle (Fig 2), which was incised vertically to avoid neurovascular injury and identify the tumor fixed to the galea (Fig 3)... To restore functional integrity of the muscle, a layered closure was performed... Any indentations or contour irregularities caused by the tumor naturally remodeled over time.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Exposed lipoma after blunt dissection.
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Figure 3: Exposed lipoma after blunt dissection.

Mentions: Our patient underwent direct surgical excision. The skin was incised transversely through forehead rhytid and the dissection directed to the frontalis muscle (Fig 2), which was incised vertically to avoid neurovascular injury and identify the tumor fixed to the galea (Fig 3). Blunt dissection continued along the perimeter of the tumor to ensure complete resection (Fig 4). Pathology identified the mass as mature adipose tissue consistent with a subgaleal lipoma. To restore functional integrity of the muscle, a layered closure was performed. Any indentations or contour irregularities caused by the tumor naturally remodeled over time.


Submuscular lipoma of the forehead.

Neches SK, Parcells AL, Feintisch AM, Granick MS - Eplasty (2015)

Exposed lipoma after blunt dissection.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4376100&req=5

Figure 3: Exposed lipoma after blunt dissection.
Mentions: Our patient underwent direct surgical excision. The skin was incised transversely through forehead rhytid and the dissection directed to the frontalis muscle (Fig 2), which was incised vertically to avoid neurovascular injury and identify the tumor fixed to the galea (Fig 3). Blunt dissection continued along the perimeter of the tumor to ensure complete resection (Fig 4). Pathology identified the mass as mature adipose tissue consistent with a subgaleal lipoma. To restore functional integrity of the muscle, a layered closure was performed. Any indentations or contour irregularities caused by the tumor naturally remodeled over time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Plastic Surgery, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Common forehead masses include dermoid cysts, hemangiomas, lipomas, epidermal inclusion cysts, and osteomas... Lipomas are the most common tumor of mesenchymal origin, and frontalis-associated lipomas are based on 4 subtypes: intramuscular, arising from within the frontalis muscle of the forehead; submuscular, between the frontalis and its deep investing fascia (galea); subgaleal, between the galea and the periosteum; and subperiosteal... These masses are most commonly found in men 40 to 70 years old... While these lesions may be managed by observation, the forehead is a cosmetically sensitive area and most patients elect for surgical excision... A minimally invasive endoscopic approach has been described for subcutaneous lipomas to reduce scarring, avoid injury to the supraorbital and supratrochlear neurovascular bundles, and reduce postoperative pain... For deeper frontalis-associated lipomas, direct en bloc resection is often required to successfully excise the tumor... Our patient underwent direct surgical excision... The skin was incised transversely through forehead rhytid and the dissection directed to the frontalis muscle (Fig 2), which was incised vertically to avoid neurovascular injury and identify the tumor fixed to the galea (Fig 3)... To restore functional integrity of the muscle, a layered closure was performed... Any indentations or contour irregularities caused by the tumor naturally remodeled over time.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus