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Correlating Mediterranean shallow water deposits with global Oligocene-Miocene stratigraphy and oceanic events.

Reuter M, Piller WE, Brandano M, Harzhauser M - Glob Planet Change (2013)

Bottom Line: Integrated multi-proxy and facies analyses indicate that CaCO3 and total organic carbon contents as well as gamma-ray display only local to regional processes on the carbonate platform and are not suited for stratigraphic correlation on a wider scale.In contrast, new biostratigraphic data correlate the Decontra stable carbon isotope record to the global deep-sea carbon isotope record.This links relative sea level fluctuations, which are reflected by facies and magnetic susceptibility changes, to third-order eustatic cycles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Earth Sciences, University of Graz, Heinrichstrasse 26, 8010 Graz, Austria.

ABSTRACT

Shallow-marine sediment records have the strong potential to display sensitive environmental changes in sedimentary geometries and skeletal content. However, the time resolution of most neritic carbonate records is not high enough to be compared with climatic events as recorded in the deep-sea sediment archives. In order to resolve the paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic changes during the Oligocene-Miocene transition in the Mediterranean shallow water carbonate systems with the best possible time resolution, we re-evaluated the Decontra section on the Maiella Platform (central Apennines, Italy), which acts as a reference for the correlation of Oligocene-Miocene shallow water deposits in the Mediterranean region. The 120-m-thick late Oligocene-late Miocene carbonate succession is composed of larger foraminiferal, bryozoan and corallinacean limestones interlayered with distinct planktonic foraminiferal carbonates representing a mostly outer neritic setting. Integrated multi-proxy and facies analyses indicate that CaCO3 and total organic carbon contents as well as gamma-ray display only local to regional processes on the carbonate platform and are not suited for stratigraphic correlation on a wider scale. In contrast, new biostratigraphic data correlate the Decontra stable carbon isotope record to the global deep-sea carbon isotope record. This links relative sea level fluctuations, which are reflected by facies and magnetic susceptibility changes, to third-order eustatic cycles. The new integrated bio-, chemo-, and sequence stratigraphic framework enables a more precise timing of environmental changes within the studied time interval and identifies Decontra as an important locality for correlating not only shallow and deep water sediments of the Mediterranean region but also on a global scale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of the various informal lithostratigraphic units and present age models for the Oligocene–Miocene Bolognano Formation on the Maiella carbonate platform; chronostratigraphy according to Gradstein et al. (2012), SB = boundaries of depositional sequences (Mutti et al., 1999).
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f0005: Comparison of the various informal lithostratigraphic units and present age models for the Oligocene–Miocene Bolognano Formation on the Maiella carbonate platform; chronostratigraphy according to Gradstein et al. (2012), SB = boundaries of depositional sequences (Mutti et al., 1999).

Mentions: The Maiella Platform is a long-lived carbonate platform (Jurassic–Miocene) at the northern edge of the isolated Apulia Platform. The last phase of carbonate deposition is represented by the up to 200-m-thick Bolognano Formation (Oligocene–Miocene), which was deposited on a low inclined ramp at the northwestern platform margin (Vecsei et al., 1997; Mutti et al., 1999). The Bolognano Formation is subdivided into various informal members (Crescenti et al., 1969; Mutti et al., 1999; Vecsei and Sanders, 1999; Carnevale et al., 2011; Fig. 1). According to Mutti et al. (1997, 1999) three depositional sequences, including shallow water to deeper water sediments, were differentiated in the northwestern Maiella. The first depositional sequence is unconformably overlying Eocene limestones (Vecsei and Sanders, 1999). It starts with cross-bedded, bioclastic grainstones and rudstones of the Lower Bryozoan Limestone. Due to the dominance of lepidocyclinids this informal lithostratigraphic unit is also named Lepidocyclina Limestone by several authors (Merola, 2007; Carnevale et al., 2011; Brandano et al., 2012). It is overlain by siliceous hemipelagic marls and marly limestones (Orbulina Marls sensu Mutti et al., 1997, 1999; Cerratina cherty Limestone of Carnevale et al., 2011). The second depositional sequence begins with a monotonous succession of cross-bedded grainstones dominated by planktonic foraminifers, bryozoans, and echinoderms (Upper Bryozoan Limestone of Mutti et al., 1997, 1999) and ends with Orbulina-rich marls (Orbulina Marls sensu Mutti et al., 1997, 1999; Orbulina Limestone of Carnevale et al., 2011). The hemipelagic deposits in the upper part of the first and second depositional sequences (Orbulina Marls/Cerratina cherty Limestone, Orbulina Limestone) are wedge-shaped in cross-section and disappear toward the platform in the SE (Mutti et al., 1999). Due to its lesser SE-extent, the second hemipelagic interval does not occur in the section studied by Mutti et al. (1997, 1999; Decontra section) (Fig. 1). The second depositional sequence is unconformably overlain by the Lithothamnium Limestone, which is composed of coralline red algae, benthic foraminifers and molluscs followed by hemipelagic marls (Orbulina Marls according to Mutti et al., 1997, 1999; Turborotalia multiloba Marl of Carnevale et al., 2011). These informal lithostratigraphic units form the third depositional sequence of Mutti et al. (1997, 1999). The uppermost interval Orbulina Marls/T. multiloba Marl is not exposed in the Decontra section (Mutti et al., 1997, 1999; this study; Fig. 1) but laterally present.


Correlating Mediterranean shallow water deposits with global Oligocene-Miocene stratigraphy and oceanic events.

Reuter M, Piller WE, Brandano M, Harzhauser M - Glob Planet Change (2013)

Comparison of the various informal lithostratigraphic units and present age models for the Oligocene–Miocene Bolognano Formation on the Maiella carbonate platform; chronostratigraphy according to Gradstein et al. (2012), SB = boundaries of depositional sequences (Mutti et al., 1999).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4376058&req=5

f0005: Comparison of the various informal lithostratigraphic units and present age models for the Oligocene–Miocene Bolognano Formation on the Maiella carbonate platform; chronostratigraphy according to Gradstein et al. (2012), SB = boundaries of depositional sequences (Mutti et al., 1999).
Mentions: The Maiella Platform is a long-lived carbonate platform (Jurassic–Miocene) at the northern edge of the isolated Apulia Platform. The last phase of carbonate deposition is represented by the up to 200-m-thick Bolognano Formation (Oligocene–Miocene), which was deposited on a low inclined ramp at the northwestern platform margin (Vecsei et al., 1997; Mutti et al., 1999). The Bolognano Formation is subdivided into various informal members (Crescenti et al., 1969; Mutti et al., 1999; Vecsei and Sanders, 1999; Carnevale et al., 2011; Fig. 1). According to Mutti et al. (1997, 1999) three depositional sequences, including shallow water to deeper water sediments, were differentiated in the northwestern Maiella. The first depositional sequence is unconformably overlying Eocene limestones (Vecsei and Sanders, 1999). It starts with cross-bedded, bioclastic grainstones and rudstones of the Lower Bryozoan Limestone. Due to the dominance of lepidocyclinids this informal lithostratigraphic unit is also named Lepidocyclina Limestone by several authors (Merola, 2007; Carnevale et al., 2011; Brandano et al., 2012). It is overlain by siliceous hemipelagic marls and marly limestones (Orbulina Marls sensu Mutti et al., 1997, 1999; Cerratina cherty Limestone of Carnevale et al., 2011). The second depositional sequence begins with a monotonous succession of cross-bedded grainstones dominated by planktonic foraminifers, bryozoans, and echinoderms (Upper Bryozoan Limestone of Mutti et al., 1997, 1999) and ends with Orbulina-rich marls (Orbulina Marls sensu Mutti et al., 1997, 1999; Orbulina Limestone of Carnevale et al., 2011). The hemipelagic deposits in the upper part of the first and second depositional sequences (Orbulina Marls/Cerratina cherty Limestone, Orbulina Limestone) are wedge-shaped in cross-section and disappear toward the platform in the SE (Mutti et al., 1999). Due to its lesser SE-extent, the second hemipelagic interval does not occur in the section studied by Mutti et al. (1997, 1999; Decontra section) (Fig. 1). The second depositional sequence is unconformably overlain by the Lithothamnium Limestone, which is composed of coralline red algae, benthic foraminifers and molluscs followed by hemipelagic marls (Orbulina Marls according to Mutti et al., 1997, 1999; Turborotalia multiloba Marl of Carnevale et al., 2011). These informal lithostratigraphic units form the third depositional sequence of Mutti et al. (1997, 1999). The uppermost interval Orbulina Marls/T. multiloba Marl is not exposed in the Decontra section (Mutti et al., 1997, 1999; this study; Fig. 1) but laterally present.

Bottom Line: Integrated multi-proxy and facies analyses indicate that CaCO3 and total organic carbon contents as well as gamma-ray display only local to regional processes on the carbonate platform and are not suited for stratigraphic correlation on a wider scale.In contrast, new biostratigraphic data correlate the Decontra stable carbon isotope record to the global deep-sea carbon isotope record.This links relative sea level fluctuations, which are reflected by facies and magnetic susceptibility changes, to third-order eustatic cycles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Earth Sciences, University of Graz, Heinrichstrasse 26, 8010 Graz, Austria.

ABSTRACT

Shallow-marine sediment records have the strong potential to display sensitive environmental changes in sedimentary geometries and skeletal content. However, the time resolution of most neritic carbonate records is not high enough to be compared with climatic events as recorded in the deep-sea sediment archives. In order to resolve the paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic changes during the Oligocene-Miocene transition in the Mediterranean shallow water carbonate systems with the best possible time resolution, we re-evaluated the Decontra section on the Maiella Platform (central Apennines, Italy), which acts as a reference for the correlation of Oligocene-Miocene shallow water deposits in the Mediterranean region. The 120-m-thick late Oligocene-late Miocene carbonate succession is composed of larger foraminiferal, bryozoan and corallinacean limestones interlayered with distinct planktonic foraminiferal carbonates representing a mostly outer neritic setting. Integrated multi-proxy and facies analyses indicate that CaCO3 and total organic carbon contents as well as gamma-ray display only local to regional processes on the carbonate platform and are not suited for stratigraphic correlation on a wider scale. In contrast, new biostratigraphic data correlate the Decontra stable carbon isotope record to the global deep-sea carbon isotope record. This links relative sea level fluctuations, which are reflected by facies and magnetic susceptibility changes, to third-order eustatic cycles. The new integrated bio-, chemo-, and sequence stratigraphic framework enables a more precise timing of environmental changes within the studied time interval and identifies Decontra as an important locality for correlating not only shallow and deep water sediments of the Mediterranean region but also on a global scale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus