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Prospects for dedicated energy crop production and attitudes towards agricultural straw use: The case of livestock farmers.

Wilson P, Glithero NJ, Ramsden SJ - Energy Policy (2014)

Bottom Line: If higher market prices for straw occurred, most livestock farmers would continue to buy straw.Results demonstrate limited potential for the production of DECs on livestock farms in England.Policy support for DEC production must be cognisant of farm-level economic, tenancy and personal objectives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Nottingham LE12 5RD, UK.

ABSTRACT

Second generation biofuels utilising agricultural by-products (e.g. straw), or dedicated energy crops (DECs) produced on 'marginal' land, have been called for. A structured telephone survey of 263 livestock farmers, predominantly located in the west or 'marginal' upland areas of England captured data on attitudes towards straw use and DECs. Combined with farm physical and business data, the survey results show that 7.2% and 6.3% of farmers would respectively consider growing SRC and miscanthus, producing respective maximum potential English crop areas of 54,603 ha and 43,859 ha. If higher market prices for straw occurred, most livestock farmers would continue to buy straw. Reasons for not being willing to consider growing DECs include concerns over land quality, committing land for a long time period, lack of appropriate machinery, profitability, and time to financial return; a range of moral, land quality, production conflict and lack of crop knowledge factors were also cited. Results demonstrate limited potential for the production of DECs on livestock farms in England. Changes in policy support to address farmer concerns with respect to DECs will be required to incentivise farmers to increase energy crop production. Policy support for DEC production must be cognisant of farm-level economic, tenancy and personal objectives.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Potential maximum and minimum production of short rotation coppice (SRC) and miscanthus (Misc) from dairy, LFA grazing and lowland grazing farms by Government Office Region of England based upon respondents who would consider growing each crop.
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f0010: Potential maximum and minimum production of short rotation coppice (SRC) and miscanthus (Misc) from dairy, LFA grazing and lowland grazing farms by Government Office Region of England based upon respondents who would consider growing each crop.

Mentions: Those livestock farmers willing to consider growing SRC or miscanthus were asked to indicate the percentage of their farm area that they would be willing to commit to these crops. These responses were then combined with data from the FBS on farm area, and aggregated to provide GOR and hence national (England) estimates of the minimum and maximum crop areas that would potentially be grown on livestock farms. Fig. 2 presents the results of this analysis; the largest potential maximum crop growth area for both SRC and miscanthus is the South East of England. More modest areas of crop production possibilities were identified in the North East, North West, and Yorkshire and the Humber. For England, the maximum (minimum) potential area of SRC that would be grown on dairy, LFA grazing livestock and lowland grazing livestock farms is 54,603 ha (17,156 ha); the respective results for miscanthus are 43,859 ha (12,321 ha).


Prospects for dedicated energy crop production and attitudes towards agricultural straw use: The case of livestock farmers.

Wilson P, Glithero NJ, Ramsden SJ - Energy Policy (2014)

Potential maximum and minimum production of short rotation coppice (SRC) and miscanthus (Misc) from dairy, LFA grazing and lowland grazing farms by Government Office Region of England based upon respondents who would consider growing each crop.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4375795&req=5

f0010: Potential maximum and minimum production of short rotation coppice (SRC) and miscanthus (Misc) from dairy, LFA grazing and lowland grazing farms by Government Office Region of England based upon respondents who would consider growing each crop.
Mentions: Those livestock farmers willing to consider growing SRC or miscanthus were asked to indicate the percentage of their farm area that they would be willing to commit to these crops. These responses were then combined with data from the FBS on farm area, and aggregated to provide GOR and hence national (England) estimates of the minimum and maximum crop areas that would potentially be grown on livestock farms. Fig. 2 presents the results of this analysis; the largest potential maximum crop growth area for both SRC and miscanthus is the South East of England. More modest areas of crop production possibilities were identified in the North East, North West, and Yorkshire and the Humber. For England, the maximum (minimum) potential area of SRC that would be grown on dairy, LFA grazing livestock and lowland grazing livestock farms is 54,603 ha (17,156 ha); the respective results for miscanthus are 43,859 ha (12,321 ha).

Bottom Line: If higher market prices for straw occurred, most livestock farmers would continue to buy straw.Results demonstrate limited potential for the production of DECs on livestock farms in England.Policy support for DEC production must be cognisant of farm-level economic, tenancy and personal objectives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Nottingham LE12 5RD, UK.

ABSTRACT

Second generation biofuels utilising agricultural by-products (e.g. straw), or dedicated energy crops (DECs) produced on 'marginal' land, have been called for. A structured telephone survey of 263 livestock farmers, predominantly located in the west or 'marginal' upland areas of England captured data on attitudes towards straw use and DECs. Combined with farm physical and business data, the survey results show that 7.2% and 6.3% of farmers would respectively consider growing SRC and miscanthus, producing respective maximum potential English crop areas of 54,603 ha and 43,859 ha. If higher market prices for straw occurred, most livestock farmers would continue to buy straw. Reasons for not being willing to consider growing DECs include concerns over land quality, committing land for a long time period, lack of appropriate machinery, profitability, and time to financial return; a range of moral, land quality, production conflict and lack of crop knowledge factors were also cited. Results demonstrate limited potential for the production of DECs on livestock farms in England. Changes in policy support to address farmer concerns with respect to DECs will be required to incentivise farmers to increase energy crop production. Policy support for DEC production must be cognisant of farm-level economic, tenancy and personal objectives.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus