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Ultracold neutron detectors based on (10)B converters used in the qBounce experiments.

Jenke T, Cronenberg G, Filter H, Geltenbort P, Klein M, Lauer T, Mitsch K, Saul H, Seiler D, Stadler D, Thalhammer M, Abele H - Nucl Instrum Methods Phys Res A (2013)

Bottom Line: The mentioned experiments utilize a beam-monitoring concept which accounts for variations in the neutron flux that are typical for nuclear research facilities.The converter can also be used for detectors, which feature high efficiencies paired with high spatial resolution of [Formula: see text].They allow one to resolve the quantum mechanical wave function of an ultracold neutron bound in the gravity potential above a neutron mirror.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Atominstitut TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien, Austria.

ABSTRACT

Gravity experiments with very slow, so-called ultracold neutrons connect quantum mechanics with tests of Newton's inverse square law at short distances. These experiments face a low count rate and hence need highly optimized detector concepts. In the frame of this paper, we present low-background ultracold neutron counters and track detectors with micron resolution based on a (10)B converter. We discuss the optimization of (10)B converter layers, detector design and concepts for read-out electronics focusing on high-efficiency and low-background. We describe modifications of the counters that allow one to detect ultracold neutrons selectively on their spin-orientation. This is required for searches of hypothetical forces with spin-mass couplings. The mentioned experiments utilize a beam-monitoring concept which accounts for variations in the neutron flux that are typical for nuclear research facilities. The converter can also be used for detectors, which feature high efficiencies paired with high spatial resolution of [Formula: see text]. They allow one to resolve the quantum mechanical wave function of an ultracold neutron bound in the gravity potential above a neutron mirror.

No MeSH data available.


Total energy spectrum and background behaviour of our UCN counter. All measurements performed in our beam time in 2012 are summed up and divided by the total measuring times. The optimal ROI  regarding signal-to-noise is indicated in red (black). The exponential increase toward smaller channels originates from electronic noise. A hardware threshold rejects signals with very small pulse heights (adapted from: [26, Fig. 4.9, p. 55]). (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)
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f0050: Total energy spectrum and background behaviour of our UCN counter. All measurements performed in our beam time in 2012 are summed up and divided by the total measuring times. The optimal ROI regarding signal-to-noise is indicated in red (black). The exponential increase toward smaller channels originates from electronic noise. A hardware threshold rejects signals with very small pulse heights (adapted from: [26, Fig. 4.9, p. 55]). (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

Mentions: The energy spectrum and the total background behaviour of our current UCN counter is given in Fig. 10. In this plot, all measurements performed in our beam time in 2012 are summed up and normalized to the total measuring times.


Ultracold neutron detectors based on (10)B converters used in the qBounce experiments.

Jenke T, Cronenberg G, Filter H, Geltenbort P, Klein M, Lauer T, Mitsch K, Saul H, Seiler D, Stadler D, Thalhammer M, Abele H - Nucl Instrum Methods Phys Res A (2013)

Total energy spectrum and background behaviour of our UCN counter. All measurements performed in our beam time in 2012 are summed up and divided by the total measuring times. The optimal ROI  regarding signal-to-noise is indicated in red (black). The exponential increase toward smaller channels originates from electronic noise. A hardware threshold rejects signals with very small pulse heights (adapted from: [26, Fig. 4.9, p. 55]). (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4375608&req=5

f0050: Total energy spectrum and background behaviour of our UCN counter. All measurements performed in our beam time in 2012 are summed up and divided by the total measuring times. The optimal ROI regarding signal-to-noise is indicated in red (black). The exponential increase toward smaller channels originates from electronic noise. A hardware threshold rejects signals with very small pulse heights (adapted from: [26, Fig. 4.9, p. 55]). (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)
Mentions: The energy spectrum and the total background behaviour of our current UCN counter is given in Fig. 10. In this plot, all measurements performed in our beam time in 2012 are summed up and normalized to the total measuring times.

Bottom Line: The mentioned experiments utilize a beam-monitoring concept which accounts for variations in the neutron flux that are typical for nuclear research facilities.The converter can also be used for detectors, which feature high efficiencies paired with high spatial resolution of [Formula: see text].They allow one to resolve the quantum mechanical wave function of an ultracold neutron bound in the gravity potential above a neutron mirror.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Atominstitut TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien, Austria.

ABSTRACT

Gravity experiments with very slow, so-called ultracold neutrons connect quantum mechanics with tests of Newton's inverse square law at short distances. These experiments face a low count rate and hence need highly optimized detector concepts. In the frame of this paper, we present low-background ultracold neutron counters and track detectors with micron resolution based on a (10)B converter. We discuss the optimization of (10)B converter layers, detector design and concepts for read-out electronics focusing on high-efficiency and low-background. We describe modifications of the counters that allow one to detect ultracold neutrons selectively on their spin-orientation. This is required for searches of hypothetical forces with spin-mass couplings. The mentioned experiments utilize a beam-monitoring concept which accounts for variations in the neutron flux that are typical for nuclear research facilities. The converter can also be used for detectors, which feature high efficiencies paired with high spatial resolution of [Formula: see text]. They allow one to resolve the quantum mechanical wave function of an ultracold neutron bound in the gravity potential above a neutron mirror.

No MeSH data available.