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Development of an item list to assess the forgotten joint concept in shoulder patients.

Giesinger JM, Kesterke N, Hamilton DF, Holzner B, Jost B, Giesinger K - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2015)

Bottom Line: Stepwise item selection resulted in 97 items to be evaluated by the international expert board leaving 70 items for collecting patient feedback.The majority of patients indicated that the introductory text explaining the forgotten joint concept was easy or very easy to understand (79.3%) and that the items were clear (91.4%).We developed a list of 70 questions for the assessment of joint awareness in shoulder patients and obtained positive patient feedback for these.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychosocial Research and Epidemiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066, Amsterdam, CX, The Netherlands. johannes.giesinger@i-med.ac.at.

ABSTRACT

Background: To generate an item list for the assessment of joint awareness in shoulder patients and to collect patient feedback on the comprehensibility of the items and the forgotten joint concept.

Methods: Item content was generated on the basis of literature search and expert ratings following a stepwise refinement procedure, including final evaluation by an international expert board (n = 12) including members with various professional backgrounds. Items were translated from English to German and evaluated in 30 German-speaking shoulder patients in Switzerland and 30 shoulder patients in the UK.

Results: Literature search identified 45 questionnaires covering 805 issues potentially relevant for the assessment of joint awareness. Stepwise item selection resulted in 97 items to be evaluated by the international expert board leaving 70 items for collecting patient feedback. The majority of patients indicated that the introductory text explaining the forgotten joint concept was easy or very easy to understand (79.3%) and that the items were clear (91.4%).

Conclusion: We developed a list of 70 questions for the assessment of joint awareness in shoulder patients and obtained positive patient feedback for these. In a next step, we will administer the items to a large international patient sample to obtain data for psychometric analysis and development of a measurement model, which is the basis for creation of computer-adaptive assessments or static short-forms.

No MeSH data available.


Flow-chart on item list development.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig1: Flow-chart on item list development.

Mentions: Our literature search identified 45 questionnaires assessing PROs in shoulder patients (see section on list of questionnaires below). Full text versions of 43 questionnaires with a total of 648 items were available. In case of instruments including clinician assessment and patient-report, we included both with the exception of objective measurements. The 648 items covered 805 issues potentially relevant to shoulder patients, as several items included two or more issues (e.g., “I have difficulty opening, holding, pushing, or pressing [e.g., triggers, levers, heavy doors]”. All issues were assessed by three raters (two orthopedic surgeons, one psychologist) concerning their relevance for the assessment of the forgotten joint concept. All three raters agreed on in/exclusion of 68.5% of the issues, whereas for 31.5%, only two raters agreed. After a consensus discussion, 158 issues were dropped and 647 remained in the list. Please see Figure 1 for an overview of the item development process.Figure 1


Development of an item list to assess the forgotten joint concept in shoulder patients.

Giesinger JM, Kesterke N, Hamilton DF, Holzner B, Jost B, Giesinger K - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2015)

Flow-chart on item list development.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374495&req=5

Fig1: Flow-chart on item list development.
Mentions: Our literature search identified 45 questionnaires assessing PROs in shoulder patients (see section on list of questionnaires below). Full text versions of 43 questionnaires with a total of 648 items were available. In case of instruments including clinician assessment and patient-report, we included both with the exception of objective measurements. The 648 items covered 805 issues potentially relevant to shoulder patients, as several items included two or more issues (e.g., “I have difficulty opening, holding, pushing, or pressing [e.g., triggers, levers, heavy doors]”. All issues were assessed by three raters (two orthopedic surgeons, one psychologist) concerning their relevance for the assessment of the forgotten joint concept. All three raters agreed on in/exclusion of 68.5% of the issues, whereas for 31.5%, only two raters agreed. After a consensus discussion, 158 issues were dropped and 647 remained in the list. Please see Figure 1 for an overview of the item development process.Figure 1

Bottom Line: Stepwise item selection resulted in 97 items to be evaluated by the international expert board leaving 70 items for collecting patient feedback.The majority of patients indicated that the introductory text explaining the forgotten joint concept was easy or very easy to understand (79.3%) and that the items were clear (91.4%).We developed a list of 70 questions for the assessment of joint awareness in shoulder patients and obtained positive patient feedback for these.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychosocial Research and Epidemiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066, Amsterdam, CX, The Netherlands. johannes.giesinger@i-med.ac.at.

ABSTRACT

Background: To generate an item list for the assessment of joint awareness in shoulder patients and to collect patient feedback on the comprehensibility of the items and the forgotten joint concept.

Methods: Item content was generated on the basis of literature search and expert ratings following a stepwise refinement procedure, including final evaluation by an international expert board (n = 12) including members with various professional backgrounds. Items were translated from English to German and evaluated in 30 German-speaking shoulder patients in Switzerland and 30 shoulder patients in the UK.

Results: Literature search identified 45 questionnaires covering 805 issues potentially relevant for the assessment of joint awareness. Stepwise item selection resulted in 97 items to be evaluated by the international expert board leaving 70 items for collecting patient feedback. The majority of patients indicated that the introductory text explaining the forgotten joint concept was easy or very easy to understand (79.3%) and that the items were clear (91.4%).

Conclusion: We developed a list of 70 questions for the assessment of joint awareness in shoulder patients and obtained positive patient feedback for these. In a next step, we will administer the items to a large international patient sample to obtain data for psychometric analysis and development of a measurement model, which is the basis for creation of computer-adaptive assessments or static short-forms.

No MeSH data available.