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Spatial variability of microbial assemblages associated with a dominant habitat-forming seaweed.

Campbell AH, Marzinelli EM, Gelber J, Steinberg PD - Front Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: We used the disappearance of the dominant canopy-forming fucoid Phyllospora comosa from the metropolitan coast of Sydney, NSW, Australia as a model system to study these interactions.We transplanted Phyllospora individuals from nearby, extant populations back onto reefs in Sydney to test whether bacterial assemblages associated with seaweed surfaces would be influenced by (i) the host itself, independently of where it occurs, (ii) the type of habitat where the host occurs, or (iii) site-specific differences.Rather, they were primarily influenced by local, site-specific conditions with some evidence for host-specificity in some cases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Marine Bio-Innovation and School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales Sydney, NSW, Australia ; Sydney Institute of Marine Science, Mosman NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Macroalgal surfaces support abundant and diverse microorganisms within biofilms, which are often involved in fundamental functions relating to the health and defense of their seaweed hosts, including algal development, facilitation of spore release, and chemical antifouling. Given these intimate and important interactions, environmental changes have the potential to negatively impact macroalgae by disrupting seaweed-microbe interactions. We used the disappearance of the dominant canopy-forming fucoid Phyllospora comosa from the metropolitan coast of Sydney, NSW, Australia as a model system to study these interactions. We transplanted Phyllospora individuals from nearby, extant populations back onto reefs in Sydney to test whether bacterial assemblages associated with seaweed surfaces would be influenced by (i) the host itself, independently of where it occurs, (ii) the type of habitat where the host occurs, or (iii) site-specific differences. Analyses of bacterial DNA fingerprints (terminal fragment length polymorphisms) indicated that assemblages of bacteria on Phyllospora were not habitat-specific. Rather, they were primarily influenced by local, site-specific conditions with some evidence for host-specificity in some cases. This could suggest a lottery model of host-surface colonization, by which hosts are colonized by 'suitable' bacteria available in the local species pool, resulting in high variability in assemblage structure across sites, but where some species in the community are specific to the host and possibly influenced by differences in host traits.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

nMDS based on Bray-Curtis measure of square-root transformed relative abundances (structure) or Jaccard measure (composition) of bacterial TRFLP on Phyllospora comosa originally from Croa (empty symbols) or Palm Beach (filled symbols) in the second experiment. Treatments: Undisturbed (green symbols), Translocated (blue symbols), Transplanted (red symbols). Destination places: Croa (circles), Palm Beach (squares), Long Bay (downward triangle), Cape Banks (upward triangle).
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Figure 2: nMDS based on Bray-Curtis measure of square-root transformed relative abundances (structure) or Jaccard measure (composition) of bacterial TRFLP on Phyllospora comosa originally from Croa (empty symbols) or Palm Beach (filled symbols) in the second experiment. Treatments: Undisturbed (green symbols), Translocated (blue symbols), Transplanted (red symbols). Destination places: Croa (circles), Palm Beach (squares), Long Bay (downward triangle), Cape Banks (upward triangle).

Mentions: In the second experiment, bacterial TRFs on algae originally from Palm Beach differed across all treatments. The same trend was observed for bacteria on algae originally from Croa, although pairwise comparisons could not resolve where these differences occurred and hence there was a significant Treatment × Place interaction (Table 2; Figure 2).


Spatial variability of microbial assemblages associated with a dominant habitat-forming seaweed.

Campbell AH, Marzinelli EM, Gelber J, Steinberg PD - Front Microbiol (2015)

nMDS based on Bray-Curtis measure of square-root transformed relative abundances (structure) or Jaccard measure (composition) of bacterial TRFLP on Phyllospora comosa originally from Croa (empty symbols) or Palm Beach (filled symbols) in the second experiment. Treatments: Undisturbed (green symbols), Translocated (blue symbols), Transplanted (red symbols). Destination places: Croa (circles), Palm Beach (squares), Long Bay (downward triangle), Cape Banks (upward triangle).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374473&req=5

Figure 2: nMDS based on Bray-Curtis measure of square-root transformed relative abundances (structure) or Jaccard measure (composition) of bacterial TRFLP on Phyllospora comosa originally from Croa (empty symbols) or Palm Beach (filled symbols) in the second experiment. Treatments: Undisturbed (green symbols), Translocated (blue symbols), Transplanted (red symbols). Destination places: Croa (circles), Palm Beach (squares), Long Bay (downward triangle), Cape Banks (upward triangle).
Mentions: In the second experiment, bacterial TRFs on algae originally from Palm Beach differed across all treatments. The same trend was observed for bacteria on algae originally from Croa, although pairwise comparisons could not resolve where these differences occurred and hence there was a significant Treatment × Place interaction (Table 2; Figure 2).

Bottom Line: We used the disappearance of the dominant canopy-forming fucoid Phyllospora comosa from the metropolitan coast of Sydney, NSW, Australia as a model system to study these interactions.We transplanted Phyllospora individuals from nearby, extant populations back onto reefs in Sydney to test whether bacterial assemblages associated with seaweed surfaces would be influenced by (i) the host itself, independently of where it occurs, (ii) the type of habitat where the host occurs, or (iii) site-specific differences.Rather, they were primarily influenced by local, site-specific conditions with some evidence for host-specificity in some cases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Marine Bio-Innovation and School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales Sydney, NSW, Australia ; Sydney Institute of Marine Science, Mosman NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Macroalgal surfaces support abundant and diverse microorganisms within biofilms, which are often involved in fundamental functions relating to the health and defense of their seaweed hosts, including algal development, facilitation of spore release, and chemical antifouling. Given these intimate and important interactions, environmental changes have the potential to negatively impact macroalgae by disrupting seaweed-microbe interactions. We used the disappearance of the dominant canopy-forming fucoid Phyllospora comosa from the metropolitan coast of Sydney, NSW, Australia as a model system to study these interactions. We transplanted Phyllospora individuals from nearby, extant populations back onto reefs in Sydney to test whether bacterial assemblages associated with seaweed surfaces would be influenced by (i) the host itself, independently of where it occurs, (ii) the type of habitat where the host occurs, or (iii) site-specific differences. Analyses of bacterial DNA fingerprints (terminal fragment length polymorphisms) indicated that assemblages of bacteria on Phyllospora were not habitat-specific. Rather, they were primarily influenced by local, site-specific conditions with some evidence for host-specificity in some cases. This could suggest a lottery model of host-surface colonization, by which hosts are colonized by 'suitable' bacteria available in the local species pool, resulting in high variability in assemblage structure across sites, but where some species in the community are specific to the host and possibly influenced by differences in host traits.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus