Limits...
Predictive coding and multisensory integration: an attentional account of the multisensory mind.

Talsma D - Front Integr Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Here I argue that, despite recent insights suggesting that multisensory interactions can occur at very early latencies, the actual integration of individual sensory traces into an internally consistent mental representation is dependent on both top-down and bottom-up processes.Moreover, I argue that this integration is not limited to just sensory inputs, but that internal cognitive processes also shape the resulting mental representation.This empirical evidence will be discussed from a predictive coding perspective, in which a central top-down attentional process is proposed to play a central role in coordinating the integration of all these inputs into a coherent mental representation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, Ghent University Ghent, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
Multisensory integration involves a host of different cognitive processes, occurring at different stages of sensory processing. Here I argue that, despite recent insights suggesting that multisensory interactions can occur at very early latencies, the actual integration of individual sensory traces into an internally consistent mental representation is dependent on both top-down and bottom-up processes. Moreover, I argue that this integration is not limited to just sensory inputs, but that internal cognitive processes also shape the resulting mental representation. Studies showing that memory recall is affected by the initial multisensory context in which the stimuli were presented will be discussed, as well as several studies showing that mental imagery can affect multisensory illusions. This empirical evidence will be discussed from a predictive coding perspective, in which a central top-down attentional process is proposed to play a central role in coordinating the integration of all these inputs into a coherent mental representation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A classical view of multisensory integration. According to this view, visual and auditory signals were first analyzed in the respective sensory cortices, before they were integrated in the secondary association areas, located in the temporo-parietal areas between the auditory and visual cortices.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374459&req=5

Figure 1: A classical view of multisensory integration. According to this view, visual and auditory signals were first analyzed in the respective sensory cortices, before they were integrated in the secondary association areas, located in the temporo-parietal areas between the auditory and visual cortices.

Mentions: Bloom and Lazeron’s (1988) description clearly indicates that the merging of information across the senses was supposed to take place after the initial sensory processing had come to completion (see Figure 1). Since that time, however, many discoveries have suggested that multisensory integration is more complex than this. For example, in addition to the aforementioned single cell recordings, electrophysiological studies showed that multisensory interactions can already take place as early as 40 ms after stimulus presentation, which is considerably earlier than initially thought possible (Giard and Péronnet, 1999; Molholm et al., 2002).


Predictive coding and multisensory integration: an attentional account of the multisensory mind.

Talsma D - Front Integr Neurosci (2015)

A classical view of multisensory integration. According to this view, visual and auditory signals were first analyzed in the respective sensory cortices, before they were integrated in the secondary association areas, located in the temporo-parietal areas between the auditory and visual cortices.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374459&req=5

Figure 1: A classical view of multisensory integration. According to this view, visual and auditory signals were first analyzed in the respective sensory cortices, before they were integrated in the secondary association areas, located in the temporo-parietal areas between the auditory and visual cortices.
Mentions: Bloom and Lazeron’s (1988) description clearly indicates that the merging of information across the senses was supposed to take place after the initial sensory processing had come to completion (see Figure 1). Since that time, however, many discoveries have suggested that multisensory integration is more complex than this. For example, in addition to the aforementioned single cell recordings, electrophysiological studies showed that multisensory interactions can already take place as early as 40 ms after stimulus presentation, which is considerably earlier than initially thought possible (Giard and Péronnet, 1999; Molholm et al., 2002).

Bottom Line: Here I argue that, despite recent insights suggesting that multisensory interactions can occur at very early latencies, the actual integration of individual sensory traces into an internally consistent mental representation is dependent on both top-down and bottom-up processes.Moreover, I argue that this integration is not limited to just sensory inputs, but that internal cognitive processes also shape the resulting mental representation.This empirical evidence will be discussed from a predictive coding perspective, in which a central top-down attentional process is proposed to play a central role in coordinating the integration of all these inputs into a coherent mental representation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, Ghent University Ghent, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
Multisensory integration involves a host of different cognitive processes, occurring at different stages of sensory processing. Here I argue that, despite recent insights suggesting that multisensory interactions can occur at very early latencies, the actual integration of individual sensory traces into an internally consistent mental representation is dependent on both top-down and bottom-up processes. Moreover, I argue that this integration is not limited to just sensory inputs, but that internal cognitive processes also shape the resulting mental representation. Studies showing that memory recall is affected by the initial multisensory context in which the stimuli were presented will be discussed, as well as several studies showing that mental imagery can affect multisensory illusions. This empirical evidence will be discussed from a predictive coding perspective, in which a central top-down attentional process is proposed to play a central role in coordinating the integration of all these inputs into a coherent mental representation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus