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Feasibility and utility of telephone-based psychological support for people with brain tumor: a single-case experimental study.

Jones S, Ownsworth T, Shum DH - Front Oncol (2015)

Bottom Line: Of the four participants, two of them demonstrated significant gains in mental health (depression and/or anxiety) and a significant decrease in their levels of helplessness (p < 0.05).The other two participants did not show gains in mental health or change in illness cognitions.Further research examining factors influencing the outcomes of tele-based psychological support is needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Applied Psychology and Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University , Brisbane, QLD , Australia.

ABSTRACT
Rates of psychological distress are high following diagnosis and treatment of brain tumor. There can be multiple barriers to accessing psychological support, including physical and cognitive impairments and geographical limitations. Tele-based support could provide an effective and more flexible option for delivering psychological interventions. The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility and utility of a telephone-based psychotherapy intervention for people with brain tumor. A single-case multiple-baseline design was employed with a 4-7-week baseline phase, 10-week treatment phase, and 5-week maintenance phase including a booster session. Four participants with a benign or malignant brain tumor (three males and one female; aged 34-49 years), received 10 sessions of tele-based therapy and a booster session at 4 weeks post-treatment. Levels of depression, anxiety, and illness cognitions were monitored on a weekly basis throughout each phase whilst measures of quality of life, stress, and self-concept were administered at the start and end of each phase. Weekly measures were analyzed using a combination of both visual analysis and Tau-U statistics. Of the four participants, two of them demonstrated significant gains in mental health (depression and/or anxiety) and a significant decrease in their levels of helplessness (p < 0.05). The other two participants did not show gains in mental health or change in illness cognitions. All participants reported improvement in quality of life post-treatment. The results of the study provide preliminary support concerning the feasibility and utility of tele-based therapy for some people with brain tumor. Further research examining factors influencing the outcomes of tele-based psychological support is needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Phases of the intervention program and assessment time points (SRS, Session Rating Scale).
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Figure 2: Phases of the intervention program and assessment time points (SRS, Session Rating Scale).

Mentions: After allocation, the researcher conducted the initial assessment session, which included the BTACT and full set of outcome measures. Participants were assessed on a weekly basis on a brief set of outcome measures (“brief”) for the duration of their allocated baseline (see Figure 2). Prior to the commencement of therapy, participants were re-administered the full set of outcome measures, with the exception of the BTACT. During therapy, participants completed the brief set of outcome measures at the start of the telephone call, just prior to therapy. Participants subsequently completed 10 sessions of individual telephone-based therapy with an additional booster session 4 weeks after their completion of the 10 sessions.


Feasibility and utility of telephone-based psychological support for people with brain tumor: a single-case experimental study.

Jones S, Ownsworth T, Shum DH - Front Oncol (2015)

Phases of the intervention program and assessment time points (SRS, Session Rating Scale).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374457&req=5

Figure 2: Phases of the intervention program and assessment time points (SRS, Session Rating Scale).
Mentions: After allocation, the researcher conducted the initial assessment session, which included the BTACT and full set of outcome measures. Participants were assessed on a weekly basis on a brief set of outcome measures (“brief”) for the duration of their allocated baseline (see Figure 2). Prior to the commencement of therapy, participants were re-administered the full set of outcome measures, with the exception of the BTACT. During therapy, participants completed the brief set of outcome measures at the start of the telephone call, just prior to therapy. Participants subsequently completed 10 sessions of individual telephone-based therapy with an additional booster session 4 weeks after their completion of the 10 sessions.

Bottom Line: Of the four participants, two of them demonstrated significant gains in mental health (depression and/or anxiety) and a significant decrease in their levels of helplessness (p < 0.05).The other two participants did not show gains in mental health or change in illness cognitions.Further research examining factors influencing the outcomes of tele-based psychological support is needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Applied Psychology and Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University , Brisbane, QLD , Australia.

ABSTRACT
Rates of psychological distress are high following diagnosis and treatment of brain tumor. There can be multiple barriers to accessing psychological support, including physical and cognitive impairments and geographical limitations. Tele-based support could provide an effective and more flexible option for delivering psychological interventions. The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility and utility of a telephone-based psychotherapy intervention for people with brain tumor. A single-case multiple-baseline design was employed with a 4-7-week baseline phase, 10-week treatment phase, and 5-week maintenance phase including a booster session. Four participants with a benign or malignant brain tumor (three males and one female; aged 34-49 years), received 10 sessions of tele-based therapy and a booster session at 4 weeks post-treatment. Levels of depression, anxiety, and illness cognitions were monitored on a weekly basis throughout each phase whilst measures of quality of life, stress, and self-concept were administered at the start and end of each phase. Weekly measures were analyzed using a combination of both visual analysis and Tau-U statistics. Of the four participants, two of them demonstrated significant gains in mental health (depression and/or anxiety) and a significant decrease in their levels of helplessness (p < 0.05). The other two participants did not show gains in mental health or change in illness cognitions. All participants reported improvement in quality of life post-treatment. The results of the study provide preliminary support concerning the feasibility and utility of tele-based therapy for some people with brain tumor. Further research examining factors influencing the outcomes of tele-based psychological support is needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus