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Imagining the impossible before breakfast: the relation between creativity, dissociation, and sleep.

van Heugten-van der Kloet D, Cosgrave J, Merckelbach H, Haines R, Golodetz S, Lynn SJ - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Poorer sleep quality and fewer hours of sleep predicted more bizarreness in the photos and captions.None of the trait measures could predict creativity.These findings contribute to our understanding of dissociative symptomatology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford Oxford, UK.

ABSTRACT
Dissociative symptoms have been related to higher rapid eye movement sleep density, a sleep phase during which hyperassociativity may occur. This may enhance artistic creativity during the day. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a creative photo contest to explore the relation between dissociation, sleep, and creativity. During the contest, participants (N = 72) took one photo per day for five consecutive days, based on specific daily themes (consisting of single words) and the instruction to take as creative a photo as possible each day. Furthermore, they completed daily measures of state dissociation and a short sleep diary. The photos and their captions were ranked by two professional photographers and two clinical psychologists based on creativity, originality, bizarreness, and quality. We expected that dissociative people would rank higher in the contest compared with low-dissociative participants, and that the most original photos would be taken on days when the participants scored highest on acute dissociation. We found that acute dissociation predicted a higher ranking on creativity. Poorer sleep quality and fewer hours of sleep predicted more bizarreness in the photos and captions. None of the trait measures could predict creativity. In sum, acute dissociation related to enhanced creativity. These findings contribute to our understanding of dissociative symptomatology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Consciousness across the sleep-wake cycle depicted as a continuum. Sleep loss or sleep disturbances may ‘push’ sleep mentation more toward the waking end of the continuum, fostering less linear thinking and the perception of a loss of self during wake, setting the stage for dissociative symptoms.
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Figure 1: Consciousness across the sleep-wake cycle depicted as a continuum. Sleep loss or sleep disturbances may ‘push’ sleep mentation more toward the waking end of the continuum, fostering less linear thinking and the perception of a loss of self during wake, setting the stage for dissociative symptoms.

Mentions: Rapid eye movement sleep is marked by an increase in cholinergic transmission, similar to wakefulness. At the same time, noradrenergic firing is inhibited during REM sleep, whereas all modulatory neurons slow down but keep firing during non-REM sleep. Accordingly, REM sleep appears to be an ideal state for hyperassociative connections to be made during dreaming. Waking consciousness involves many types of cognitions, such as daydreaming and mind wandering, which in excess could be considered dissociative in nature, (e.g., Foulkes and Fleisher, 1975). Domhoff (2011) describes these cognitions as the ‘default network’ of waking cognition (i.e., mental activity when we are not focusing our thoughts). Hartmann (2010) and Montangero (2012) have argued that thought across the sleep–wake cycle should be regarded as a continuum, with typical dreaming on the one end, focused waking thought on the other end, and daydreaming and mind wandering in between (see Figure 1). Indeed, Solms (1999) argued that “Mental state is a constantly negotiated compromise between the poles of waking (…) and dreaming.”


Imagining the impossible before breakfast: the relation between creativity, dissociation, and sleep.

van Heugten-van der Kloet D, Cosgrave J, Merckelbach H, Haines R, Golodetz S, Lynn SJ - Front Psychol (2015)

Consciousness across the sleep-wake cycle depicted as a continuum. Sleep loss or sleep disturbances may ‘push’ sleep mentation more toward the waking end of the continuum, fostering less linear thinking and the perception of a loss of self during wake, setting the stage for dissociative symptoms.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374390&req=5

Figure 1: Consciousness across the sleep-wake cycle depicted as a continuum. Sleep loss or sleep disturbances may ‘push’ sleep mentation more toward the waking end of the continuum, fostering less linear thinking and the perception of a loss of self during wake, setting the stage for dissociative symptoms.
Mentions: Rapid eye movement sleep is marked by an increase in cholinergic transmission, similar to wakefulness. At the same time, noradrenergic firing is inhibited during REM sleep, whereas all modulatory neurons slow down but keep firing during non-REM sleep. Accordingly, REM sleep appears to be an ideal state for hyperassociative connections to be made during dreaming. Waking consciousness involves many types of cognitions, such as daydreaming and mind wandering, which in excess could be considered dissociative in nature, (e.g., Foulkes and Fleisher, 1975). Domhoff (2011) describes these cognitions as the ‘default network’ of waking cognition (i.e., mental activity when we are not focusing our thoughts). Hartmann (2010) and Montangero (2012) have argued that thought across the sleep–wake cycle should be regarded as a continuum, with typical dreaming on the one end, focused waking thought on the other end, and daydreaming and mind wandering in between (see Figure 1). Indeed, Solms (1999) argued that “Mental state is a constantly negotiated compromise between the poles of waking (…) and dreaming.”

Bottom Line: Poorer sleep quality and fewer hours of sleep predicted more bizarreness in the photos and captions.None of the trait measures could predict creativity.These findings contribute to our understanding of dissociative symptomatology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford Oxford, UK.

ABSTRACT
Dissociative symptoms have been related to higher rapid eye movement sleep density, a sleep phase during which hyperassociativity may occur. This may enhance artistic creativity during the day. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a creative photo contest to explore the relation between dissociation, sleep, and creativity. During the contest, participants (N = 72) took one photo per day for five consecutive days, based on specific daily themes (consisting of single words) and the instruction to take as creative a photo as possible each day. Furthermore, they completed daily measures of state dissociation and a short sleep diary. The photos and their captions were ranked by two professional photographers and two clinical psychologists based on creativity, originality, bizarreness, and quality. We expected that dissociative people would rank higher in the contest compared with low-dissociative participants, and that the most original photos would be taken on days when the participants scored highest on acute dissociation. We found that acute dissociation predicted a higher ranking on creativity. Poorer sleep quality and fewer hours of sleep predicted more bizarreness in the photos and captions. None of the trait measures could predict creativity. In sum, acute dissociation related to enhanced creativity. These findings contribute to our understanding of dissociative symptomatology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus