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Gait assessment as a functional outcome measure in total knee arthroplasty: a cross-sectional study.

Rahman J, Tang Q, Monda M, Miles J, McCarthy I - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2015)

Bottom Line: The gait of TKA patients as a group was only slightly improved at 12 months when compared with the pre-operative group, and both groups were significantly different to controls in several variables.Even after 12 months after surgery, many TKA patients have not improved their gait relative to pre-operative patients.Routine gait assessment may be used to guide post-operative rehabilitation, and to develop strategies to improve mobility of these patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UCL Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, London, UK. jeeshanr@me.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of the study was to assess gait in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients, using a technique that can to be used on a routine basis in a busy orthopaedic clinic.

Methods: A total of 103 subjects were recruited: 29 pre-op TKA patients; 17 TKA patients at 8 weeks post-op; 28 TKA patients at 52 weeks post-op; and 29 age-matched controls. Inertial measurement units (IMUs) were used to assess gait. Limb segment angles, knee angle and temporal parameters of gait were calculated. Specific gait parameters were quantified, and data analysed using MANOVA and discriminant analysis.

Results: The gait of TKA patients as a group was only slightly improved at 12 months when compared with the pre-operative group, and both groups were significantly different to controls in several variables. Knee flexion range in stance was the most important variable in discriminating between patients and controls; knee flexion range in swing was the only variable that showed a significant difference between pre- and post-operative patients. When considered individually, only 1/29 patient was within the normal range for this variable pre-operatively, but 9/28 patients were within the normal range 12 months post-operatively.

Conclusions: Even after 12 months after surgery, many TKA patients have not improved their gait relative to pre-operative patients. Routine gait assessment may be used to guide post-operative rehabilitation, and to develop strategies to improve mobility of these patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Typical angles during gait cycle for knee, shank and thigh for the four groups in the study.
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Fig2: Typical angles during gait cycle for knee, shank and thigh for the four groups in the study.

Mentions: Mean values of knee, shank and thigh angles during the gait cycle are shown in Figure 2. Inspection shows obvious differences between the curves. Mean values for the quantitative parameters extracted from the gait profile for both the operated and non-operated legs are shown in Table 1. MANOVA showed there was a significant difference in gait variables when comparing the patient groups and healthy age-matched controls (using Roy’s Largest Root: θ = 2.95, F(8,94) = 34.66, p < 0.001). Separate univariate ANOVAs showed significant differences between controls and the three patient groups for all variables except thigh coronal ROM.Figure 2


Gait assessment as a functional outcome measure in total knee arthroplasty: a cross-sectional study.

Rahman J, Tang Q, Monda M, Miles J, McCarthy I - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2015)

Typical angles during gait cycle for knee, shank and thigh for the four groups in the study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374376&req=5

Fig2: Typical angles during gait cycle for knee, shank and thigh for the four groups in the study.
Mentions: Mean values of knee, shank and thigh angles during the gait cycle are shown in Figure 2. Inspection shows obvious differences between the curves. Mean values for the quantitative parameters extracted from the gait profile for both the operated and non-operated legs are shown in Table 1. MANOVA showed there was a significant difference in gait variables when comparing the patient groups and healthy age-matched controls (using Roy’s Largest Root: θ = 2.95, F(8,94) = 34.66, p < 0.001). Separate univariate ANOVAs showed significant differences between controls and the three patient groups for all variables except thigh coronal ROM.Figure 2

Bottom Line: The gait of TKA patients as a group was only slightly improved at 12 months when compared with the pre-operative group, and both groups were significantly different to controls in several variables.Even after 12 months after surgery, many TKA patients have not improved their gait relative to pre-operative patients.Routine gait assessment may be used to guide post-operative rehabilitation, and to develop strategies to improve mobility of these patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UCL Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, London, UK. jeeshanr@me.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of the study was to assess gait in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients, using a technique that can to be used on a routine basis in a busy orthopaedic clinic.

Methods: A total of 103 subjects were recruited: 29 pre-op TKA patients; 17 TKA patients at 8 weeks post-op; 28 TKA patients at 52 weeks post-op; and 29 age-matched controls. Inertial measurement units (IMUs) were used to assess gait. Limb segment angles, knee angle and temporal parameters of gait were calculated. Specific gait parameters were quantified, and data analysed using MANOVA and discriminant analysis.

Results: The gait of TKA patients as a group was only slightly improved at 12 months when compared with the pre-operative group, and both groups were significantly different to controls in several variables. Knee flexion range in stance was the most important variable in discriminating between patients and controls; knee flexion range in swing was the only variable that showed a significant difference between pre- and post-operative patients. When considered individually, only 1/29 patient was within the normal range for this variable pre-operatively, but 9/28 patients were within the normal range 12 months post-operatively.

Conclusions: Even after 12 months after surgery, many TKA patients have not improved their gait relative to pre-operative patients. Routine gait assessment may be used to guide post-operative rehabilitation, and to develop strategies to improve mobility of these patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus