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Factor V Leiden mutation triggering four major complications to standard dose cisplatin-chemotherapy for testicular seminoma: a case report.

Dieckmann KP, Anheuser P, Gehrckens R, Aries SP, Ikogho R, Hollburg W - BMC Urol (2015)

Bottom Line: The unique co-incidence of four major complications occurring in this patient were obviously triggered by the genetically determined predisposition of the patient to thrombotic events (FVL).Whether or not FVL contributed to the pulmonary fibrosis as well, remains elusive.Thus, precautions for preventing further complications could be initiated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Albertinen-Krankenhaus, Department of Urology, Suentelstrasse 11a, D-22457, Hamburg, Germany. DieckmannKP@t-online.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: Major life-threatening complications secondary to cisplatin-based chemotherapy are rare in patients with testicular germ cell tumour (GCT). The incidence of complications increases with dosage of chemotherapy and with a variety of patient-related as well as disease-related conditions. We here report the first case of GCT experiencing as many as four major complications most of which can be explained by the conjunction of several predispositions.

Case presentation: A 48 year old patient with testicular seminoma and bulky retroperitoneal and mediastinal metastases underwent cisplatin based chemotherapy. During the third cycle of chemotherapy, he developed thrombosis of the central venous port device, subtotal splenic infarction, and Bleomycin induced pneumonitis (BIP). Three months after completion of therapy, he was struck by thalamic infarction. Genetic testing then revealed heterozygote mutation of Factor V Leiden (FVL). He received full-dose warfarin anticoagulation treatment and steroid treatment for BIP. 18 months thereafter, the patient is still disease-free, oncologically. Neurological symptoms have disappeared, but pulmonary dysfunction persists with a vital capacity of 50%.

Conclusion: The unique co-incidence of four major complications occurring in this patient were obviously triggered by the genetically determined predisposition of the patient to thrombotic events (FVL). Additionally, several patient-related and disease-related conditions contributed to the unique pattern of complications, i.e. (1) the slightly advanced age (48 years), (2) the prothrombotic condition caused by the disease of cancer, (3) the central venous port device, (4) retroperitoneal bulky metastasis, and (5) cisplatin chemotherapy. Whether or not FVL contributed to the pulmonary fibrosis as well, remains elusive. Practically, in the case of one major vascular complication during cisplatin chemotherapy at standard dose, genetic testing for hereditary thrombophilia should be considered. Thus, precautions for preventing further complications could be initiated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Abdominal computed tomography, coronary section view showing the large retroperitoneal metastasis of seminoma before initiation of chemotherapy.
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Fig1: Abdominal computed tomography, coronary section view showing the large retroperitoneal metastasis of seminoma before initiation of chemotherapy.

Mentions: This 48 years old patient with uneventful history presented with a left sided testicular seminoma. Beta Human chorionic gonadotropin (bHCG) was elevated to 247 U/l (normal range to 2 U/l) while Alpha fetoprotein and Lactate dehydrogenase were within normal limits. Computed tomography of chest and abdomen revealed a retroperitoneal mass of 6 cm in size (Figure 1) and another one of 2 cm size in the mediastinum corresponding to clinical stage III (Lugano Classification) and to the good prognosis group according to IGCCCG classification [12].Figure 1


Factor V Leiden mutation triggering four major complications to standard dose cisplatin-chemotherapy for testicular seminoma: a case report.

Dieckmann KP, Anheuser P, Gehrckens R, Aries SP, Ikogho R, Hollburg W - BMC Urol (2015)

Abdominal computed tomography, coronary section view showing the large retroperitoneal metastasis of seminoma before initiation of chemotherapy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374368&req=5

Fig1: Abdominal computed tomography, coronary section view showing the large retroperitoneal metastasis of seminoma before initiation of chemotherapy.
Mentions: This 48 years old patient with uneventful history presented with a left sided testicular seminoma. Beta Human chorionic gonadotropin (bHCG) was elevated to 247 U/l (normal range to 2 U/l) while Alpha fetoprotein and Lactate dehydrogenase were within normal limits. Computed tomography of chest and abdomen revealed a retroperitoneal mass of 6 cm in size (Figure 1) and another one of 2 cm size in the mediastinum corresponding to clinical stage III (Lugano Classification) and to the good prognosis group according to IGCCCG classification [12].Figure 1

Bottom Line: The unique co-incidence of four major complications occurring in this patient were obviously triggered by the genetically determined predisposition of the patient to thrombotic events (FVL).Whether or not FVL contributed to the pulmonary fibrosis as well, remains elusive.Thus, precautions for preventing further complications could be initiated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Albertinen-Krankenhaus, Department of Urology, Suentelstrasse 11a, D-22457, Hamburg, Germany. DieckmannKP@t-online.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: Major life-threatening complications secondary to cisplatin-based chemotherapy are rare in patients with testicular germ cell tumour (GCT). The incidence of complications increases with dosage of chemotherapy and with a variety of patient-related as well as disease-related conditions. We here report the first case of GCT experiencing as many as four major complications most of which can be explained by the conjunction of several predispositions.

Case presentation: A 48 year old patient with testicular seminoma and bulky retroperitoneal and mediastinal metastases underwent cisplatin based chemotherapy. During the third cycle of chemotherapy, he developed thrombosis of the central venous port device, subtotal splenic infarction, and Bleomycin induced pneumonitis (BIP). Three months after completion of therapy, he was struck by thalamic infarction. Genetic testing then revealed heterozygote mutation of Factor V Leiden (FVL). He received full-dose warfarin anticoagulation treatment and steroid treatment for BIP. 18 months thereafter, the patient is still disease-free, oncologically. Neurological symptoms have disappeared, but pulmonary dysfunction persists with a vital capacity of 50%.

Conclusion: The unique co-incidence of four major complications occurring in this patient were obviously triggered by the genetically determined predisposition of the patient to thrombotic events (FVL). Additionally, several patient-related and disease-related conditions contributed to the unique pattern of complications, i.e. (1) the slightly advanced age (48 years), (2) the prothrombotic condition caused by the disease of cancer, (3) the central venous port device, (4) retroperitoneal bulky metastasis, and (5) cisplatin chemotherapy. Whether or not FVL contributed to the pulmonary fibrosis as well, remains elusive. Practically, in the case of one major vascular complication during cisplatin chemotherapy at standard dose, genetic testing for hereditary thrombophilia should be considered. Thus, precautions for preventing further complications could be initiated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus