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Orofacial granulomatosis affecting lip and gingiva in a 15-year-old patient: A rare case report.

Bansal M, Singh N, Patne S, Singh SK - Contemp Clin Dent (2015)

Bottom Line: Histologically, OFG is characterized by noncaseating granulomatous inflammation.Thus, dentists may act as a first person to diagnose the lesion and play an important role in the multidisciplinary treatment of granulomatous disorders.Here, we present a case of OFG affecting lips and gingiva in a 15-year-old patient without any identifiable systemic or local causes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontics, Faculty of Dental Sciences, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT
Orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is a rare disorder affecting the orofacial region, and clinically characterized by diffuse, nontender, soft to firm, painless swelling restricted to one or both lips and intraoral sites such as tongue, gingiva and buccal mucosa. Histologically, OFG is characterized by noncaseating granulomatous inflammation. The early diagnosis of OFG is essential for the better prognosis of the lesion. Delay in diagnosis of OFG results into formation of indurated and permanent swelling of the lip that not only compromises esthetic appearance but also causes impairment in function such as speaking and eating. Early diagnosis of OFG is challenging to the health care professionals due to clinical and histological resemblance to other chronic granulomatous disorders. Thus, dentists may act as a first person to diagnose the lesion and play an important role in the multidisciplinary treatment of granulomatous disorders. Here, we present a case of OFG affecting lips and gingiva in a 15-year-old patient without any identifiable systemic or local causes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Orthopantomogram X-ray showing no alveolar bone loss in the anterior region
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Figure 2: Orthopantomogram X-ray showing no alveolar bone loss in the anterior region

Mentions: Extra oral examination showed diffuse, nontender, soft, upper and lower lip swelling, which has a normal temperature on palpation. Mild fissures were present on the vermilion border of upper and lower lips while the upper lip showed the mild cobblestone appearance. On intraoral examination, the gingival enlargement was extended from 13 to 23 involving the attached, interdental and marginal gingiva and reached mucogingival junction in the maxilla and mandible. The enlargement covered the crown coronally up to the middle third and cervical third approximately in maxilla and mandible respectively. The gingiva was red in color, smooth and shiny. Stippling was absent [Figure 1]. Periodontal pocket probing revealed the bleeding on probing from the base of the pocket with mild local deposits and the presence of false pocket without clinical attachment loss. Orthopantomogram did not show alveolar bone loss in the maxillary and mandibular anterior region [Figure 2].


Orofacial granulomatosis affecting lip and gingiva in a 15-year-old patient: A rare case report.

Bansal M, Singh N, Patne S, Singh SK - Contemp Clin Dent (2015)

Orthopantomogram X-ray showing no alveolar bone loss in the anterior region
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374329&req=5

Figure 2: Orthopantomogram X-ray showing no alveolar bone loss in the anterior region
Mentions: Extra oral examination showed diffuse, nontender, soft, upper and lower lip swelling, which has a normal temperature on palpation. Mild fissures were present on the vermilion border of upper and lower lips while the upper lip showed the mild cobblestone appearance. On intraoral examination, the gingival enlargement was extended from 13 to 23 involving the attached, interdental and marginal gingiva and reached mucogingival junction in the maxilla and mandible. The enlargement covered the crown coronally up to the middle third and cervical third approximately in maxilla and mandible respectively. The gingiva was red in color, smooth and shiny. Stippling was absent [Figure 1]. Periodontal pocket probing revealed the bleeding on probing from the base of the pocket with mild local deposits and the presence of false pocket without clinical attachment loss. Orthopantomogram did not show alveolar bone loss in the maxillary and mandibular anterior region [Figure 2].

Bottom Line: Histologically, OFG is characterized by noncaseating granulomatous inflammation.Thus, dentists may act as a first person to diagnose the lesion and play an important role in the multidisciplinary treatment of granulomatous disorders.Here, we present a case of OFG affecting lips and gingiva in a 15-year-old patient without any identifiable systemic or local causes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Periodontics, Faculty of Dental Sciences, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT
Orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is a rare disorder affecting the orofacial region, and clinically characterized by diffuse, nontender, soft to firm, painless swelling restricted to one or both lips and intraoral sites such as tongue, gingiva and buccal mucosa. Histologically, OFG is characterized by noncaseating granulomatous inflammation. The early diagnosis of OFG is essential for the better prognosis of the lesion. Delay in diagnosis of OFG results into formation of indurated and permanent swelling of the lip that not only compromises esthetic appearance but also causes impairment in function such as speaking and eating. Early diagnosis of OFG is challenging to the health care professionals due to clinical and histological resemblance to other chronic granulomatous disorders. Thus, dentists may act as a first person to diagnose the lesion and play an important role in the multidisciplinary treatment of granulomatous disorders. Here, we present a case of OFG affecting lips and gingiva in a 15-year-old patient without any identifiable systemic or local causes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus