Limits...
Use of buccal myomucosal flap for palatal lengthening in cleft palate patient: Experience of 20 cases.

Varghese D, Datta S, Varghese A - Contemp Clin Dent (2015)

Bottom Line: The buccal myomucosal flap was used in all 20 patients, and there was marked increase in the quality of speech as well as nasal regurgitation decreased.In patients with levator dysfunction due to poor primary surgery and glottal speech the results were inconclusive.Palate re-repair combined with a buccal myomucosal flap, occasionally in conjunction with other techniques, is an effective method for correcting failed cleft palate repairs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Jodhpur Dental College, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this review was to assess the effectiveness of the buccal myomucosal flap in secondary repairs of cleft palate in 20 patients.

Patients and methods: Totally, 20 patients, who underwent secondary palatoplasty between 5 years and 8 years in which a buccal myomucosal flap was used, were reviewed retrospectively. All patients had undergone at least one previous attempted repair at other institutions. Indications for the secondary repair included velopharyngeal incompetence and/or oronasal fistula. Patients were evaluated preoperatively for oronasal fistula status, velopharyngeal competence, nasal resonance, speech quality, and nasal escape.

Results: The buccal myomucosal flap was used in all 20 patients, and there was marked increase in the quality of speech as well as nasal regurgitation decreased. In patients with levator dysfunction due to poor primary surgery and glottal speech the results were inconclusive.

Conclusion: Palate re-repair combined with a buccal myomucosal flap, occasionally in conjunction with other techniques, is an effective method for correcting failed cleft palate repairs. Minimum donor site morbidity and complication makes the buccal flap a useful armamentarium of a cleft surgeon.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Anterior palatal fistula closure using buccal myo mucosal flap
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374316&req=5

Figure 2: Anterior palatal fistula closure using buccal myo mucosal flap

Mentions: The primary aim of cleft palate surgery is not only to close the cleft palate but to push back the palate by repositioning the levator muscle to ensure that normal speech is obtained.[1] Using a buccal myomucosal flap is a readily effective method for velopharyngeal closure when the cleft palate is wide.[2] Buccal musculomucosal flap is commonly used in cleft palate surgery for providing additional lining when nasal mucosa is inadequate.[3] It is an axial pattern flap which can be based either on the buccal or facial arteries. It is flexible and versatile and unlike most free flaps, provides mucosal, as opposed to skin, cover. The donor site can usually be closed primarily without causing deformity or scarring. The flap is about 5 mm thick and comprises buccal mucosa, submucosa, and buccinator muscle, with the feeding vessels and vascular plexus.[4] The technique presented has been effective, with the advantages of palatal closure without tension, good muscular reconstruction, lengthening of the nasal layer, and palatal closure without raw areas.[5] The aim of this study is to review the experience with the buccinator myomucosal flap, for clinical application in the secondary cleft cases with velopharyngeal insufficiency [Figure 1] and nasal regurgitation along with palatal fistula [Figure 2].


Use of buccal myomucosal flap for palatal lengthening in cleft palate patient: Experience of 20 cases.

Varghese D, Datta S, Varghese A - Contemp Clin Dent (2015)

Anterior palatal fistula closure using buccal myo mucosal flap
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374316&req=5

Figure 2: Anterior palatal fistula closure using buccal myo mucosal flap
Mentions: The primary aim of cleft palate surgery is not only to close the cleft palate but to push back the palate by repositioning the levator muscle to ensure that normal speech is obtained.[1] Using a buccal myomucosal flap is a readily effective method for velopharyngeal closure when the cleft palate is wide.[2] Buccal musculomucosal flap is commonly used in cleft palate surgery for providing additional lining when nasal mucosa is inadequate.[3] It is an axial pattern flap which can be based either on the buccal or facial arteries. It is flexible and versatile and unlike most free flaps, provides mucosal, as opposed to skin, cover. The donor site can usually be closed primarily without causing deformity or scarring. The flap is about 5 mm thick and comprises buccal mucosa, submucosa, and buccinator muscle, with the feeding vessels and vascular plexus.[4] The technique presented has been effective, with the advantages of palatal closure without tension, good muscular reconstruction, lengthening of the nasal layer, and palatal closure without raw areas.[5] The aim of this study is to review the experience with the buccinator myomucosal flap, for clinical application in the secondary cleft cases with velopharyngeal insufficiency [Figure 1] and nasal regurgitation along with palatal fistula [Figure 2].

Bottom Line: The buccal myomucosal flap was used in all 20 patients, and there was marked increase in the quality of speech as well as nasal regurgitation decreased.In patients with levator dysfunction due to poor primary surgery and glottal speech the results were inconclusive.Palate re-repair combined with a buccal myomucosal flap, occasionally in conjunction with other techniques, is an effective method for correcting failed cleft palate repairs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Jodhpur Dental College, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this review was to assess the effectiveness of the buccal myomucosal flap in secondary repairs of cleft palate in 20 patients.

Patients and methods: Totally, 20 patients, who underwent secondary palatoplasty between 5 years and 8 years in which a buccal myomucosal flap was used, were reviewed retrospectively. All patients had undergone at least one previous attempted repair at other institutions. Indications for the secondary repair included velopharyngeal incompetence and/or oronasal fistula. Patients were evaluated preoperatively for oronasal fistula status, velopharyngeal competence, nasal resonance, speech quality, and nasal escape.

Results: The buccal myomucosal flap was used in all 20 patients, and there was marked increase in the quality of speech as well as nasal regurgitation decreased. In patients with levator dysfunction due to poor primary surgery and glottal speech the results were inconclusive.

Conclusion: Palate re-repair combined with a buccal myomucosal flap, occasionally in conjunction with other techniques, is an effective method for correcting failed cleft palate repairs. Minimum donor site morbidity and complication makes the buccal flap a useful armamentarium of a cleft surgeon.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus