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Five years follow-up of a keratocyst odontogenic tumor treated by marsupialization and enucleation: A case report and literature review.

de Molon RS, Verzola MH, Pires LC, Mascarenhas VI, da Silva RB, Cirelli JA, Barbeiro RH - Contemp Clin Dent (2015)

Bottom Line: After 5 years, no signs of recurrence were observed.In conclusion, this treatment protocol was an effective and conservative approach for the management of the KCOT, enabling the reduction of the initial lesion, the preservation of anatomical structures and teeth, allowing quicker return to function.No signs of recurrence after 5 years were observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diagnosis and Surgery, School of Dentistry, Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Odontogenic cysts are considered as nonneoplasic benign lesions. Among the cysts, keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is an intra-osseous tumor characterized by parakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium and a potential for aggressive, infiltrative behavior, and for the possibility to develop carcinomas in the lesion wall. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe a clinical case of KCOT in a young patient and discuss the treatment alternatives to solve this case. A 15-year-old male was referred for treatment of a giant lesion in his left side of the mandible. After the biopsy, a diagnostic of KCOT was made, and the following procedures were planned for KCOT treatment. Marsupialization was performed for lesion decompression and consequent lesion size reduction. Afterward, enucleation for complete KCOT removal was performed followed by third mandibular molar extraction. After 5 years, no signs of recurrence were observed. The treatment proposed was efficient in removing the KCOT with minimal surgical morbidity and optimal healing process, and the first and second mandibular molars were preserved with pulp vitality. In conclusion, this treatment protocol was an effective and conservative approach for the management of the KCOT, enabling the reduction of the initial lesion, the preservation of anatomical structures and teeth, allowing quicker return to function. No signs of recurrence after 5 years were observed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Second panoramic image showed a radiolucent area surrounded by a radiopaque halo around the unerupted third molar
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Figure 2: Second panoramic image showed a radiolucent area surrounded by a radiopaque halo around the unerupted third molar

Mentions: A new panoramic radiography and a computed tomography (CT) scan were requested to the patient. The panoramic image showed a radiolucent area surrounded by a radiopaque halo around the unerupted third molar, blocking their eruption [Figure 2]. The size of the lesion was increased compared to the first radiographic image. CT scan showed a cavity in the left mandibular body with a partial absence of buccal bone plate and part of the lingual bone wall preserved [Figure 3]. Based on clinical and radiographic features, the diagnosis of a KCOT was suggested, and the treatment possibilities were discussed with the patient and parents.


Five years follow-up of a keratocyst odontogenic tumor treated by marsupialization and enucleation: A case report and literature review.

de Molon RS, Verzola MH, Pires LC, Mascarenhas VI, da Silva RB, Cirelli JA, Barbeiro RH - Contemp Clin Dent (2015)

Second panoramic image showed a radiolucent area surrounded by a radiopaque halo around the unerupted third molar
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374304&req=5

Figure 2: Second panoramic image showed a radiolucent area surrounded by a radiopaque halo around the unerupted third molar
Mentions: A new panoramic radiography and a computed tomography (CT) scan were requested to the patient. The panoramic image showed a radiolucent area surrounded by a radiopaque halo around the unerupted third molar, blocking their eruption [Figure 2]. The size of the lesion was increased compared to the first radiographic image. CT scan showed a cavity in the left mandibular body with a partial absence of buccal bone plate and part of the lingual bone wall preserved [Figure 3]. Based on clinical and radiographic features, the diagnosis of a KCOT was suggested, and the treatment possibilities were discussed with the patient and parents.

Bottom Line: After 5 years, no signs of recurrence were observed.In conclusion, this treatment protocol was an effective and conservative approach for the management of the KCOT, enabling the reduction of the initial lesion, the preservation of anatomical structures and teeth, allowing quicker return to function.No signs of recurrence after 5 years were observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diagnosis and Surgery, School of Dentistry, Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Odontogenic cysts are considered as nonneoplasic benign lesions. Among the cysts, keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is an intra-osseous tumor characterized by parakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium and a potential for aggressive, infiltrative behavior, and for the possibility to develop carcinomas in the lesion wall. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe a clinical case of KCOT in a young patient and discuss the treatment alternatives to solve this case. A 15-year-old male was referred for treatment of a giant lesion in his left side of the mandible. After the biopsy, a diagnostic of KCOT was made, and the following procedures were planned for KCOT treatment. Marsupialization was performed for lesion decompression and consequent lesion size reduction. Afterward, enucleation for complete KCOT removal was performed followed by third mandibular molar extraction. After 5 years, no signs of recurrence were observed. The treatment proposed was efficient in removing the KCOT with minimal surgical morbidity and optimal healing process, and the first and second mandibular molars were preserved with pulp vitality. In conclusion, this treatment protocol was an effective and conservative approach for the management of the KCOT, enabling the reduction of the initial lesion, the preservation of anatomical structures and teeth, allowing quicker return to function. No signs of recurrence after 5 years were observed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus