Limits...
Primary bladder lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell type: Case report and literature review of 26 cases.

Simpson WG, Lopez A, Babbar P, Payne LF - Urol Ann (2015 Apr-Jun)

Bottom Line: Although Matsuno et al. and others state the most common type is mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, 20% of all the primary lymphomas of the urinary bladder are considered to be high grade neoplasms; the majority being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL).This is a case report of a 48-year-old man that presented with hematuria, frequency, nocturia, and flank pain that was found to have high grade DLBCL.The most successful therapies used to treat high grade lesions were solitary chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, duanorubacin, vincristine, prednisolone [CHOP] or ritoximab, CHOP [R-CHOP]) and combination therapies (2 radiation/CHOP, 2 surgery/CHOP).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine, Lewisburg, WV 24901, USA.

ABSTRACT
Primary lymphoma of the urinary bladder is exceedingly rare, representing 0.2% of all extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Although Matsuno et al. and others state the most common type is mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, 20% of all the primary lymphomas of the urinary bladder are considered to be high grade neoplasms; the majority being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). This is a case report of a 48-year-old man that presented with hematuria, frequency, nocturia, and flank pain that was found to have high grade DLBCL. Twenty-six other cases of both low and high grade primary bladder lymphomas were selected in order to provide a thorough comparison of different treatment modalities. Of the cases reviewed, bladder lymphoma was more common in females (2:1). The average age at diagnosis was 63.9 years old (low grade: 68.7 years old, high grade: 58.8 years old). The most common low-grade neoplasm was MALT lymphoma (85.7%). For the low-grade malignancies, the most successful treatments were simple therapies (2 transurethral resection of a bladder tumour [TURBT], 1 antibiotics), solitary chemotherapy, and combination TURBT/chemo; all 3 of which achieved 100% clinical remission (CR) in the cases reviewed. The most common high grade neoplasm was DLBCL (76.9%). The most successful therapies used to treat high grade lesions were solitary chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, duanorubacin, vincristine, prednisolone [CHOP] or ritoximab, CHOP [R-CHOP]) and combination therapies (2 radiation/CHOP, 2 surgery/CHOP). In the agreement with the current literature, this review has shown that simple therapies (TURBT) are equally as effective as aggressive treatments (chemotherapy, radiation) and should therefore be used as first line treatment in low grade tumors. For high grade malignancies, chemotherapy (R-CHOP or CHOP) alone or combination therapy (CHOP/surgery or CHOP/radiation) is recommended.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Computed topography scan without contrast of a 48-year-old man presenting with a 1-month history of hematuria, frequency, and flank pain, showing 4.9 cm × 6.3 cm mass on the right anterolateral wall of the bladder
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374275&req=5

Figure 2: Computed topography scan without contrast of a 48-year-old man presenting with a 1-month history of hematuria, frequency, and flank pain, showing 4.9 cm × 6.3 cm mass on the right anterolateral wall of the bladder

Mentions: A computed tomography (CT) renay survey with and without contrast showed a 4.9 cm × 6.3 cm bladder mass [Figures 1 and 2] as well as right sided hydrouerteronephrosis and left distal ureter dilation. Transurethral resection was performed, and the initial pathology report showed invasive, poorly-differentiated, malignant tumor extending through the muscularis propria into the perivesicular adipose tissue. Immunohistochemical staining came back positive for CD10 and leukocyte common antigen, and negative for chromagranin. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) testing was negative for C-MYC, BCL-6, and BCL-2 gene rearrangement. The final diagnosis was DLBCL. Due to the highly invasive nature of the tumor, bone marrow (BM) biopsy was performed and showed no evidence of leukemia or lymphoma. A positron emission tomography (PET) scan showed a large uptake in the bladder (standardized uptake values [SUV]: 23.5, SUVmax: 35.2) and secondary “tree budding” nodules in the left lower lobe of the lung. The PET scan also showed small foci at the inferior pancreatic tail; magnetic resonance imaging is scheduled to further evaluate the pancreatic mass.


Primary bladder lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell type: Case report and literature review of 26 cases.

Simpson WG, Lopez A, Babbar P, Payne LF - Urol Ann (2015 Apr-Jun)

Computed topography scan without contrast of a 48-year-old man presenting with a 1-month history of hematuria, frequency, and flank pain, showing 4.9 cm × 6.3 cm mass on the right anterolateral wall of the bladder
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374275&req=5

Figure 2: Computed topography scan without contrast of a 48-year-old man presenting with a 1-month history of hematuria, frequency, and flank pain, showing 4.9 cm × 6.3 cm mass on the right anterolateral wall of the bladder
Mentions: A computed tomography (CT) renay survey with and without contrast showed a 4.9 cm × 6.3 cm bladder mass [Figures 1 and 2] as well as right sided hydrouerteronephrosis and left distal ureter dilation. Transurethral resection was performed, and the initial pathology report showed invasive, poorly-differentiated, malignant tumor extending through the muscularis propria into the perivesicular adipose tissue. Immunohistochemical staining came back positive for CD10 and leukocyte common antigen, and negative for chromagranin. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) testing was negative for C-MYC, BCL-6, and BCL-2 gene rearrangement. The final diagnosis was DLBCL. Due to the highly invasive nature of the tumor, bone marrow (BM) biopsy was performed and showed no evidence of leukemia or lymphoma. A positron emission tomography (PET) scan showed a large uptake in the bladder (standardized uptake values [SUV]: 23.5, SUVmax: 35.2) and secondary “tree budding” nodules in the left lower lobe of the lung. The PET scan also showed small foci at the inferior pancreatic tail; magnetic resonance imaging is scheduled to further evaluate the pancreatic mass.

Bottom Line: Although Matsuno et al. and others state the most common type is mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, 20% of all the primary lymphomas of the urinary bladder are considered to be high grade neoplasms; the majority being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL).This is a case report of a 48-year-old man that presented with hematuria, frequency, nocturia, and flank pain that was found to have high grade DLBCL.The most successful therapies used to treat high grade lesions were solitary chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, duanorubacin, vincristine, prednisolone [CHOP] or ritoximab, CHOP [R-CHOP]) and combination therapies (2 radiation/CHOP, 2 surgery/CHOP).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine, Lewisburg, WV 24901, USA.

ABSTRACT
Primary lymphoma of the urinary bladder is exceedingly rare, representing 0.2% of all extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Although Matsuno et al. and others state the most common type is mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, 20% of all the primary lymphomas of the urinary bladder are considered to be high grade neoplasms; the majority being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). This is a case report of a 48-year-old man that presented with hematuria, frequency, nocturia, and flank pain that was found to have high grade DLBCL. Twenty-six other cases of both low and high grade primary bladder lymphomas were selected in order to provide a thorough comparison of different treatment modalities. Of the cases reviewed, bladder lymphoma was more common in females (2:1). The average age at diagnosis was 63.9 years old (low grade: 68.7 years old, high grade: 58.8 years old). The most common low-grade neoplasm was MALT lymphoma (85.7%). For the low-grade malignancies, the most successful treatments were simple therapies (2 transurethral resection of a bladder tumour [TURBT], 1 antibiotics), solitary chemotherapy, and combination TURBT/chemo; all 3 of which achieved 100% clinical remission (CR) in the cases reviewed. The most common high grade neoplasm was DLBCL (76.9%). The most successful therapies used to treat high grade lesions were solitary chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, duanorubacin, vincristine, prednisolone [CHOP] or ritoximab, CHOP [R-CHOP]) and combination therapies (2 radiation/CHOP, 2 surgery/CHOP). In the agreement with the current literature, this review has shown that simple therapies (TURBT) are equally as effective as aggressive treatments (chemotherapy, radiation) and should therefore be used as first line treatment in low grade tumors. For high grade malignancies, chemotherapy (R-CHOP or CHOP) alone or combination therapy (CHOP/surgery or CHOP/radiation) is recommended.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus