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A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of "on-demand" tramadol for treatment of premature ejaculation.

Kurkar A, Elderwy AA, Abulsorour S, Awad SM, Safwat AS, Altaher A - Urol Ann (2015 Apr-Jun)

Bottom Line: Side-effects of medications were reported.Two patients discontinued tramadol 100 mg due to side-effects.Tramadol hydrochloride exhibits a significant dose-related efficacy and side-effects over placebo for treatment of PE.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Assiut University Hospitals, Assiut 71515, Egypt.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The objective of this study is to assess the dose-related effects of tramadol on a group of patients with premature ejaculation (PE).

Subjects and methods: During the period of months between June 2010 and July 2012, 180 PE patients presented to outpatient clinic of our hospital. Patients were randomized in a 1:1:1 fashion to receive different sequences of the three medications: placebo, 50 mg of tramadol and 100 mg of tramadol. Every patient received 10 doses of each medication for 2 months. Intra-vaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) was recorded in seconds initially and for each arm. Successful treatment of PE is defined if IELT exceeded 120 s. Side-effects of medications were reported.

Results: Of patients enrolled, 125 (69.4%) continued the study. Patients' age range was 20-55 years with PE complaint of 1 to 10 years duration. Mean IELT was 72 at presentation, 82 for placebo, 150 for tramadol 50 mg, and 272 for tramadol 100 mg (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). PE was successfully treated in only 2.4% of patients with placebo, in contrast to 53.6% and 85.6% with 50 and 100 mg tramadol, respectively (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, baseline IELT was the only predictor of successful treatment of PE with both tramadol 50 mg (odds ratio [OR]: 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.07, P < 0.001) and tramadol 100 mg (OR: 1.07, 95% CI: 1.04-1.11, P < 0.001). Postmicturition dribble annoyed 12.8% of those who received 50 mg tramadol and 33.6% of those who received 100 mg tramadol (P < 0.001). Weak scanty ejaculation was the main complaint in 7.2% versus 21.6% of those using 50 and 100 mg tramadol, respectively (P = 0.002). Two patients discontinued tramadol 100 mg due to side-effects.

Conclusion: Tramadol hydrochloride exhibits a significant dose-related efficacy and side-effects over placebo for treatment of PE.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Success rate of premature ejaculation treatment in relation to baseline intra-vaginal ejaculatory latency time among the three therapeutic arms; placebo (P=0.554), tramadol 50 mg (P<0.001) and tramadol 100 mg (P<0.001)
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Figure 1: Success rate of premature ejaculation treatment in relation to baseline intra-vaginal ejaculatory latency time among the three therapeutic arms; placebo (P=0.554), tramadol 50 mg (P<0.001) and tramadol 100 mg (P<0.001)

Mentions: Mean IELT was 72 at baseline, 82 for placebo, 150 for tramadol 50 mg and 272 for tramadol 100 mg (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). PE was successfully treated in only 2.4% of patients with placebo, in contrast to 53.6% and 85.6% with 50 and 100 mg tramadol, respectively (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Tramadol therapy was significantly more effective for those with baseline IELT 60-120 [Figure 1].


A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of "on-demand" tramadol for treatment of premature ejaculation.

Kurkar A, Elderwy AA, Abulsorour S, Awad SM, Safwat AS, Altaher A - Urol Ann (2015 Apr-Jun)

Success rate of premature ejaculation treatment in relation to baseline intra-vaginal ejaculatory latency time among the three therapeutic arms; placebo (P=0.554), tramadol 50 mg (P<0.001) and tramadol 100 mg (P<0.001)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374260&req=5

Figure 1: Success rate of premature ejaculation treatment in relation to baseline intra-vaginal ejaculatory latency time among the three therapeutic arms; placebo (P=0.554), tramadol 50 mg (P<0.001) and tramadol 100 mg (P<0.001)
Mentions: Mean IELT was 72 at baseline, 82 for placebo, 150 for tramadol 50 mg and 272 for tramadol 100 mg (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). PE was successfully treated in only 2.4% of patients with placebo, in contrast to 53.6% and 85.6% with 50 and 100 mg tramadol, respectively (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Tramadol therapy was significantly more effective for those with baseline IELT 60-120 [Figure 1].

Bottom Line: Side-effects of medications were reported.Two patients discontinued tramadol 100 mg due to side-effects.Tramadol hydrochloride exhibits a significant dose-related efficacy and side-effects over placebo for treatment of PE.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Assiut University Hospitals, Assiut 71515, Egypt.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The objective of this study is to assess the dose-related effects of tramadol on a group of patients with premature ejaculation (PE).

Subjects and methods: During the period of months between June 2010 and July 2012, 180 PE patients presented to outpatient clinic of our hospital. Patients were randomized in a 1:1:1 fashion to receive different sequences of the three medications: placebo, 50 mg of tramadol and 100 mg of tramadol. Every patient received 10 doses of each medication for 2 months. Intra-vaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) was recorded in seconds initially and for each arm. Successful treatment of PE is defined if IELT exceeded 120 s. Side-effects of medications were reported.

Results: Of patients enrolled, 125 (69.4%) continued the study. Patients' age range was 20-55 years with PE complaint of 1 to 10 years duration. Mean IELT was 72 at presentation, 82 for placebo, 150 for tramadol 50 mg, and 272 for tramadol 100 mg (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). PE was successfully treated in only 2.4% of patients with placebo, in contrast to 53.6% and 85.6% with 50 and 100 mg tramadol, respectively (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, baseline IELT was the only predictor of successful treatment of PE with both tramadol 50 mg (odds ratio [OR]: 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.07, P < 0.001) and tramadol 100 mg (OR: 1.07, 95% CI: 1.04-1.11, P < 0.001). Postmicturition dribble annoyed 12.8% of those who received 50 mg tramadol and 33.6% of those who received 100 mg tramadol (P < 0.001). Weak scanty ejaculation was the main complaint in 7.2% versus 21.6% of those using 50 and 100 mg tramadol, respectively (P = 0.002). Two patients discontinued tramadol 100 mg due to side-effects.

Conclusion: Tramadol hydrochloride exhibits a significant dose-related efficacy and side-effects over placebo for treatment of PE.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus