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A narrowing range of bone scan in newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients: A retrospective comparative study.

Özgür BC, Gültekin S, Ekici M, Yılmazer D, Alper M - Urol Ann (2015 Apr-Jun)

Bottom Line: Bone metastases were seen in 44 patients of all 220 patients (20%, 95% confidence interval, 17-24%).In univariate analysis, PSA and biopsy GS were useful in predicting the bone scan result, but ALP and percentage of pathological cores was not.In multivariate analysis, the single most useful parameter in predicting the bone scan result was PSA (P < 0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Ankara Research and Training Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The objective of the following study is to clarify a suitable group whereby a bone scan could be spared at the initial staging of prostate cancer, we wished to identify the possible relationship between bone metastasis and clinical and pathological parameters including serum total prostate specific antigen (PSA) concentration, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), biopsy Gleason Score (GS), and percentage of pathological cores.

Materials and methods: We reviewed the results of 220 bone scintigraphies, which were done between January 1, 2011 and June 30, 2013 in patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer. These parameters were evaluated together with standard clinicopathological data to determine the prediction ability of the bone scan by univariate and multivariate analyses.

Results: Bone metastases were seen in 44 patients of all 220 patients (20%, 95% confidence interval, 17-24%). In univariate analysis, PSA and biopsy GS were useful in predicting the bone scan result, but ALP and percentage of pathological cores was not. In multivariate analysis, the single most useful parameter in predicting the bone scan result was PSA (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: A bone scan seems to be impractical in newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients with serum PSA level <20 ng/ml and GS up to seven and pre-treatment PSA is the best predictor of the need for the bone scan according to results of this study.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Receiver operating characteristics-analysis for prostate specific antigen values (area under the curve: 0,902, [95% confidence interval: 0,855; 0,938] P < 0.001)
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Figure 1: Receiver operating characteristics-analysis for prostate specific antigen values (area under the curve: 0,902, [95% confidence interval: 0,855; 0,938] P < 0.001)

Mentions: When we used PSA serum concentration <10 ng/mL, 10 to ≤20 ng/mL and >20 ng/mL as a cut-off point, of these 44, patients presented bone metastasis in scintigraphy four patients (9%) had PSA serum concentration <10 ng/mL, 5 (%11.3) had PSA serum concentration ≥10 to ≤20 ng/mL and 35 (79.5%) had PSA concentration >20 ng/mL. According to ROC analysis, a cut-off value of 19.8 was found with a sensitivity of 79.5% and specificity of 94.3%. OR for this cut-off value was 14.0. AUC of the ROC analysis was found as 0.902 (P < 0.0001) [Figure 1]. The same cutting points were used for 176 patients presented without bone metastasis in scintigraphy; 120 (68.1%) patients had PSA value <10 ng/mL, 47 (26.7%) had PSA serum concentration ≥10 to ≤20 ng/mL and 9 (5.1%) had PSA value >20 ng/mL, as given in Table 2.


A narrowing range of bone scan in newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients: A retrospective comparative study.

Özgür BC, Gültekin S, Ekici M, Yılmazer D, Alper M - Urol Ann (2015 Apr-Jun)

Receiver operating characteristics-analysis for prostate specific antigen values (area under the curve: 0,902, [95% confidence interval: 0,855; 0,938] P < 0.001)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374258&req=5

Figure 1: Receiver operating characteristics-analysis for prostate specific antigen values (area under the curve: 0,902, [95% confidence interval: 0,855; 0,938] P < 0.001)
Mentions: When we used PSA serum concentration <10 ng/mL, 10 to ≤20 ng/mL and >20 ng/mL as a cut-off point, of these 44, patients presented bone metastasis in scintigraphy four patients (9%) had PSA serum concentration <10 ng/mL, 5 (%11.3) had PSA serum concentration ≥10 to ≤20 ng/mL and 35 (79.5%) had PSA concentration >20 ng/mL. According to ROC analysis, a cut-off value of 19.8 was found with a sensitivity of 79.5% and specificity of 94.3%. OR for this cut-off value was 14.0. AUC of the ROC analysis was found as 0.902 (P < 0.0001) [Figure 1]. The same cutting points were used for 176 patients presented without bone metastasis in scintigraphy; 120 (68.1%) patients had PSA value <10 ng/mL, 47 (26.7%) had PSA serum concentration ≥10 to ≤20 ng/mL and 9 (5.1%) had PSA value >20 ng/mL, as given in Table 2.

Bottom Line: Bone metastases were seen in 44 patients of all 220 patients (20%, 95% confidence interval, 17-24%).In univariate analysis, PSA and biopsy GS were useful in predicting the bone scan result, but ALP and percentage of pathological cores was not.In multivariate analysis, the single most useful parameter in predicting the bone scan result was PSA (P < 0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Ankara Research and Training Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The objective of the following study is to clarify a suitable group whereby a bone scan could be spared at the initial staging of prostate cancer, we wished to identify the possible relationship between bone metastasis and clinical and pathological parameters including serum total prostate specific antigen (PSA) concentration, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), biopsy Gleason Score (GS), and percentage of pathological cores.

Materials and methods: We reviewed the results of 220 bone scintigraphies, which were done between January 1, 2011 and June 30, 2013 in patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer. These parameters were evaluated together with standard clinicopathological data to determine the prediction ability of the bone scan by univariate and multivariate analyses.

Results: Bone metastases were seen in 44 patients of all 220 patients (20%, 95% confidence interval, 17-24%). In univariate analysis, PSA and biopsy GS were useful in predicting the bone scan result, but ALP and percentage of pathological cores was not. In multivariate analysis, the single most useful parameter in predicting the bone scan result was PSA (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: A bone scan seems to be impractical in newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients with serum PSA level <20 ng/ml and GS up to seven and pre-treatment PSA is the best predictor of the need for the bone scan according to results of this study.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus