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Complete currarino syndrome recognized in adulthood.

Akay S, Battal B, Karaman B, Bozkurt Y - J Clin Imaging Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Currarino syndrome is a hereditary pathology that is characterized by sacrococcygeal bone defect, presacral mass, and anorectal malformation.Sacrococcygeal bone defect is almost always a part of the syndrome.The complete form of this entity displays all three abnormalities and is very uncommon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Sirnak Military Hospital, Sirnak, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Currarino syndrome is a hereditary pathology that is characterized by sacrococcygeal bone defect, presacral mass, and anorectal malformation. Sacrococcygeal bone defect is almost always a part of the syndrome. The complete form of this entity displays all three abnormalities and is very uncommon. In this report, we present the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a case with complete form of Currarino syndrome recognized in adulthood.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

20-year-old man with anal atresia operation history in childhood diagnosed with Currarino syndrome. (a) T2-weighted sagittal magnetic resonance image shows calibre of one-third of inferior rectum is very thin (thick white arrows), while superior and middle segments of the rectum are dilated (arrowheads). Also, the images demonstrate anterior meningocele (asterisk) at the posterior of the rectum related to spinal canal that originated from the neural foramen of S2 and S3 vertebrae. The lesion is isointense with cerebrospinal fluid. (b) Fat-saturated T2-weighted axial magnetic resonance image shows partial cleft at L5 vertebra corpus (thin white arrow) and dilated rectum in front of it. On (c) T1-weighted and (d) Fat-saturated T2-weighted axial magnetic resonance images, left half of the sacrum is not seen. In this part, spinal canal relationship of anterior meningocele (asterisk) and its indentation to the adjacent rectum is also observed. (e) T2-weighted coronal magnetic resonance images demonstrate the contiguity of the sacral defect and anterior meningocele (asterisk) more clearly (R = rectum, B = bladder).
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Figure 1: 20-year-old man with anal atresia operation history in childhood diagnosed with Currarino syndrome. (a) T2-weighted sagittal magnetic resonance image shows calibre of one-third of inferior rectum is very thin (thick white arrows), while superior and middle segments of the rectum are dilated (arrowheads). Also, the images demonstrate anterior meningocele (asterisk) at the posterior of the rectum related to spinal canal that originated from the neural foramen of S2 and S3 vertebrae. The lesion is isointense with cerebrospinal fluid. (b) Fat-saturated T2-weighted axial magnetic resonance image shows partial cleft at L5 vertebra corpus (thin white arrow) and dilated rectum in front of it. On (c) T1-weighted and (d) Fat-saturated T2-weighted axial magnetic resonance images, left half of the sacrum is not seen. In this part, spinal canal relationship of anterior meningocele (asterisk) and its indentation to the adjacent rectum is also observed. (e) T2-weighted coronal magnetic resonance images demonstrate the contiguity of the sacral defect and anterior meningocele (asterisk) more clearly (R = rectum, B = bladder).

Mentions: On MRI scan, calibration of one-third of the inferior rectum was observed to be very thin, while one-third of the superior and middle segments of the rectum was seen to be dilated. Bladder was displaced anteriorly because of the compression effect of dilated rectum. Partial cleft was detected at L5 vertebra corpus. S1 vertebra was partially deformed. The left half of S2 and S3 vertebrae, more distal sacral vertebrae, and coccyx were not seen. There was soft tissue heterogeneity around the anus secondary to earlier anal atresia operation. We also detected anterior meningocele related to spinal canal that originated from the neural foramen of S2 and S3 vertebrae. The lesion was isointense with cerebrospinal fluid in all of the sequences and its size was 4.5 × 3.5 cm. Anterior meningocele was slightly indented to adjacent rectum [Figure 1].


Complete currarino syndrome recognized in adulthood.

Akay S, Battal B, Karaman B, Bozkurt Y - J Clin Imaging Sci (2015)

20-year-old man with anal atresia operation history in childhood diagnosed with Currarino syndrome. (a) T2-weighted sagittal magnetic resonance image shows calibre of one-third of inferior rectum is very thin (thick white arrows), while superior and middle segments of the rectum are dilated (arrowheads). Also, the images demonstrate anterior meningocele (asterisk) at the posterior of the rectum related to spinal canal that originated from the neural foramen of S2 and S3 vertebrae. The lesion is isointense with cerebrospinal fluid. (b) Fat-saturated T2-weighted axial magnetic resonance image shows partial cleft at L5 vertebra corpus (thin white arrow) and dilated rectum in front of it. On (c) T1-weighted and (d) Fat-saturated T2-weighted axial magnetic resonance images, left half of the sacrum is not seen. In this part, spinal canal relationship of anterior meningocele (asterisk) and its indentation to the adjacent rectum is also observed. (e) T2-weighted coronal magnetic resonance images demonstrate the contiguity of the sacral defect and anterior meningocele (asterisk) more clearly (R = rectum, B = bladder).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374199&req=5

Figure 1: 20-year-old man with anal atresia operation history in childhood diagnosed with Currarino syndrome. (a) T2-weighted sagittal magnetic resonance image shows calibre of one-third of inferior rectum is very thin (thick white arrows), while superior and middle segments of the rectum are dilated (arrowheads). Also, the images demonstrate anterior meningocele (asterisk) at the posterior of the rectum related to spinal canal that originated from the neural foramen of S2 and S3 vertebrae. The lesion is isointense with cerebrospinal fluid. (b) Fat-saturated T2-weighted axial magnetic resonance image shows partial cleft at L5 vertebra corpus (thin white arrow) and dilated rectum in front of it. On (c) T1-weighted and (d) Fat-saturated T2-weighted axial magnetic resonance images, left half of the sacrum is not seen. In this part, spinal canal relationship of anterior meningocele (asterisk) and its indentation to the adjacent rectum is also observed. (e) T2-weighted coronal magnetic resonance images demonstrate the contiguity of the sacral defect and anterior meningocele (asterisk) more clearly (R = rectum, B = bladder).
Mentions: On MRI scan, calibration of one-third of the inferior rectum was observed to be very thin, while one-third of the superior and middle segments of the rectum was seen to be dilated. Bladder was displaced anteriorly because of the compression effect of dilated rectum. Partial cleft was detected at L5 vertebra corpus. S1 vertebra was partially deformed. The left half of S2 and S3 vertebrae, more distal sacral vertebrae, and coccyx were not seen. There was soft tissue heterogeneity around the anus secondary to earlier anal atresia operation. We also detected anterior meningocele related to spinal canal that originated from the neural foramen of S2 and S3 vertebrae. The lesion was isointense with cerebrospinal fluid in all of the sequences and its size was 4.5 × 3.5 cm. Anterior meningocele was slightly indented to adjacent rectum [Figure 1].

Bottom Line: Currarino syndrome is a hereditary pathology that is characterized by sacrococcygeal bone defect, presacral mass, and anorectal malformation.Sacrococcygeal bone defect is almost always a part of the syndrome.The complete form of this entity displays all three abnormalities and is very uncommon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Sirnak Military Hospital, Sirnak, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Currarino syndrome is a hereditary pathology that is characterized by sacrococcygeal bone defect, presacral mass, and anorectal malformation. Sacrococcygeal bone defect is almost always a part of the syndrome. The complete form of this entity displays all three abnormalities and is very uncommon. In this report, we present the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a case with complete form of Currarino syndrome recognized in adulthood.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus