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Malignant tenosynovial giant cell tumor of the leg: a radiologic-pathologic correlation and review of the literature.

Richman DM, Bresler SC, Rosenthal MH, Howard SA - J Clin Imaging Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Malignant tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) is a rare clinical entity that can arise as a recurrent lesion or can co-exist with a benign TGCT lesion.Malignant TGCT most commonly arises in the lower extremity and tends to be clinically aggressive, with most patients developing recurrent lesions or dying.Much of the literature describes the histopathologic features and classifies this broad group of tumors, with little description of the imaging characteristics of this disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA ; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

ABSTRACT
Malignant tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) is a rare clinical entity that can arise as a recurrent lesion or can co-exist with a benign TGCT lesion. Malignant TGCT most commonly arises in the lower extremity and tends to be clinically aggressive, with most patients developing recurrent lesions or dying. Much of the literature describes the histopathologic features and classifies this broad group of tumors, with little description of the imaging characteristics of this disease. We present the multimodality appearance of a case of malignant diffuse-type TGCT that recurred 2 months after resection with subsequent rapid clinical progression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

55-year-old female with right posterior calf pain diagnosed with tenosynovial giant cell tumor. Sagittal T1-weighted MR post-contrast imaging reveals enhancement of solid areas (arrow).
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Figure 3: 55-year-old female with right posterior calf pain diagnosed with tenosynovial giant cell tumor. Sagittal T1-weighted MR post-contrast imaging reveals enhancement of solid areas (arrow).

Mentions: Radiographs taken on presentation revealed mild osteoarthritis in bilateral knees, with fullness posterior to the right knee [Figure 1]. Post-operative ultrasound performed 7 weeks after initial resection showed a complex cystic and solid mass with hypervascular solid components [Figure 2]. MRI demonstrated a large, well-circumscribed, mixed-density soft tissue 20-cm mass, with both solid and cystic components extending from the popliteal fossa to the mid-calf [Figure 3]. CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no evidence of metastatic disease.


Malignant tenosynovial giant cell tumor of the leg: a radiologic-pathologic correlation and review of the literature.

Richman DM, Bresler SC, Rosenthal MH, Howard SA - J Clin Imaging Sci (2015)

55-year-old female with right posterior calf pain diagnosed with tenosynovial giant cell tumor. Sagittal T1-weighted MR post-contrast imaging reveals enhancement of solid areas (arrow).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374198&req=5

Figure 3: 55-year-old female with right posterior calf pain diagnosed with tenosynovial giant cell tumor. Sagittal T1-weighted MR post-contrast imaging reveals enhancement of solid areas (arrow).
Mentions: Radiographs taken on presentation revealed mild osteoarthritis in bilateral knees, with fullness posterior to the right knee [Figure 1]. Post-operative ultrasound performed 7 weeks after initial resection showed a complex cystic and solid mass with hypervascular solid components [Figure 2]. MRI demonstrated a large, well-circumscribed, mixed-density soft tissue 20-cm mass, with both solid and cystic components extending from the popliteal fossa to the mid-calf [Figure 3]. CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no evidence of metastatic disease.

Bottom Line: Malignant tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) is a rare clinical entity that can arise as a recurrent lesion or can co-exist with a benign TGCT lesion.Malignant TGCT most commonly arises in the lower extremity and tends to be clinically aggressive, with most patients developing recurrent lesions or dying.Much of the literature describes the histopathologic features and classifies this broad group of tumors, with little description of the imaging characteristics of this disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA ; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

ABSTRACT
Malignant tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) is a rare clinical entity that can arise as a recurrent lesion or can co-exist with a benign TGCT lesion. Malignant TGCT most commonly arises in the lower extremity and tends to be clinically aggressive, with most patients developing recurrent lesions or dying. Much of the literature describes the histopathologic features and classifies this broad group of tumors, with little description of the imaging characteristics of this disease. We present the multimodality appearance of a case of malignant diffuse-type TGCT that recurred 2 months after resection with subsequent rapid clinical progression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus