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Congenital absence of the right pericardium: embryology and imaging.

Koo CW, Newburg A - J Clin Imaging Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: To date, few short case reports, primarily from the pre-CT and MR era, describe congenital absence of the right pericardium.We present a more comprehensive discussion of the embryologic derangements causing such defects and offer an up-to-date review of characteristic radiologic findings.Recognition of characteristic imaging findings of congenital pericardial absence is crucial in guiding diagnosis and management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States.

ABSTRACT
Though congenital pericardial absence is often asymptomatic, complications can be life threatening. To date, few short case reports, primarily from the pre-CT and MR era, describe congenital absence of the right pericardium. We present a more comprehensive discussion of the embryologic derangements causing such defects and offer an up-to-date review of characteristic radiologic findings. Recognition of characteristic imaging findings of congenital pericardial absence is crucial in guiding diagnosis and management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

26-year-old man evaluated following an environmental exposure. (a) Scout view demonstrates a bulging right heart border. (b) Transaxial and (c) Coronal CT images confirm partial right pericardial absence. Part of the right atrial appendage extends laterally through the partial defect (arrow).
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Figure 3: 26-year-old man evaluated following an environmental exposure. (a) Scout view demonstrates a bulging right heart border. (b) Transaxial and (c) Coronal CT images confirm partial right pericardial absence. Part of the right atrial appendage extends laterally through the partial defect (arrow).

Mentions: Right-sided pericardial defects may manifest radiographically as characteristic cardiac silhouette abnormalities due to herniation of pulmonary and cardiovascular structures through the defect.[26] If the superior aspect of the right pericardium is absent, the interposed lung between the right pulmonary artery and the aorta produces a relative lucency with right pulmonary artery margin prominence [Figures 2a and b]. If the inferior aspect of the right pericardium is absent, the interposed lung may create lucency between the right inferior cardiac border and the right hemidiaphragm.[7] In instances of cardiac tissue herniation through a right pericardial defect, a prominent bulge of the right heart border may be seen [Figure 3a].[2]


Congenital absence of the right pericardium: embryology and imaging.

Koo CW, Newburg A - J Clin Imaging Sci (2015)

26-year-old man evaluated following an environmental exposure. (a) Scout view demonstrates a bulging right heart border. (b) Transaxial and (c) Coronal CT images confirm partial right pericardial absence. Part of the right atrial appendage extends laterally through the partial defect (arrow).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374196&req=5

Figure 3: 26-year-old man evaluated following an environmental exposure. (a) Scout view demonstrates a bulging right heart border. (b) Transaxial and (c) Coronal CT images confirm partial right pericardial absence. Part of the right atrial appendage extends laterally through the partial defect (arrow).
Mentions: Right-sided pericardial defects may manifest radiographically as characteristic cardiac silhouette abnormalities due to herniation of pulmonary and cardiovascular structures through the defect.[26] If the superior aspect of the right pericardium is absent, the interposed lung between the right pulmonary artery and the aorta produces a relative lucency with right pulmonary artery margin prominence [Figures 2a and b]. If the inferior aspect of the right pericardium is absent, the interposed lung may create lucency between the right inferior cardiac border and the right hemidiaphragm.[7] In instances of cardiac tissue herniation through a right pericardial defect, a prominent bulge of the right heart border may be seen [Figure 3a].[2]

Bottom Line: To date, few short case reports, primarily from the pre-CT and MR era, describe congenital absence of the right pericardium.We present a more comprehensive discussion of the embryologic derangements causing such defects and offer an up-to-date review of characteristic radiologic findings.Recognition of characteristic imaging findings of congenital pericardial absence is crucial in guiding diagnosis and management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States.

ABSTRACT
Though congenital pericardial absence is often asymptomatic, complications can be life threatening. To date, few short case reports, primarily from the pre-CT and MR era, describe congenital absence of the right pericardium. We present a more comprehensive discussion of the embryologic derangements causing such defects and offer an up-to-date review of characteristic radiologic findings. Recognition of characteristic imaging findings of congenital pericardial absence is crucial in guiding diagnosis and management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus