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Congenital absence of the right pericardium: embryology and imaging.

Koo CW, Newburg A - J Clin Imaging Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: To date, few short case reports, primarily from the pre-CT and MR era, describe congenital absence of the right pericardium.We present a more comprehensive discussion of the embryologic derangements causing such defects and offer an up-to-date review of characteristic radiologic findings.Recognition of characteristic imaging findings of congenital pericardial absence is crucial in guiding diagnosis and management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States.

ABSTRACT
Though congenital pericardial absence is often asymptomatic, complications can be life threatening. To date, few short case reports, primarily from the pre-CT and MR era, describe congenital absence of the right pericardium. We present a more comprehensive discussion of the embryologic derangements causing such defects and offer an up-to-date review of characteristic radiologic findings. Recognition of characteristic imaging findings of congenital pericardial absence is crucial in guiding diagnosis and management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Illustration of normal pericardial development from the fourth to sixth week of gestation. (a) At 4 weeks of gestation, the laterally positioned pleuropericardial folds are developed. (b) During the 5th week of gestation, the pleuropericardial folds grow toward the midline while the root of each fold migrates ventrally. (c) At the end of the 5th week, the pleuropericardial folds fuse, partitioning the thoracic cavity into a pericardial cavity and two partially formed pleural cavities. Note that union of the pleuropericardial folds and the root of the lungs also occurs during this time. (d) The lungs continue to extend anteriorly to the front of the heart.
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Figure 1: Illustration of normal pericardial development from the fourth to sixth week of gestation. (a) At 4 weeks of gestation, the laterally positioned pleuropericardial folds are developed. (b) During the 5th week of gestation, the pleuropericardial folds grow toward the midline while the root of each fold migrates ventrally. (c) At the end of the 5th week, the pleuropericardial folds fuse, partitioning the thoracic cavity into a pericardial cavity and two partially formed pleural cavities. Note that union of the pleuropericardial folds and the root of the lungs also occurs during this time. (d) The lungs continue to extend anteriorly to the front of the heart.

Mentions: At the end of the 4th week of embryo development,[2] pleuropericardial folds develop and grow medially toward the midline [Figure 1]. By the end of the 5th week, the pleuropericardial folds fuse, partitioning the thorax and two partially formed pleural cavities.


Congenital absence of the right pericardium: embryology and imaging.

Koo CW, Newburg A - J Clin Imaging Sci (2015)

Illustration of normal pericardial development from the fourth to sixth week of gestation. (a) At 4 weeks of gestation, the laterally positioned pleuropericardial folds are developed. (b) During the 5th week of gestation, the pleuropericardial folds grow toward the midline while the root of each fold migrates ventrally. (c) At the end of the 5th week, the pleuropericardial folds fuse, partitioning the thoracic cavity into a pericardial cavity and two partially formed pleural cavities. Note that union of the pleuropericardial folds and the root of the lungs also occurs during this time. (d) The lungs continue to extend anteriorly to the front of the heart.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374196&req=5

Figure 1: Illustration of normal pericardial development from the fourth to sixth week of gestation. (a) At 4 weeks of gestation, the laterally positioned pleuropericardial folds are developed. (b) During the 5th week of gestation, the pleuropericardial folds grow toward the midline while the root of each fold migrates ventrally. (c) At the end of the 5th week, the pleuropericardial folds fuse, partitioning the thoracic cavity into a pericardial cavity and two partially formed pleural cavities. Note that union of the pleuropericardial folds and the root of the lungs also occurs during this time. (d) The lungs continue to extend anteriorly to the front of the heart.
Mentions: At the end of the 4th week of embryo development,[2] pleuropericardial folds develop and grow medially toward the midline [Figure 1]. By the end of the 5th week, the pleuropericardial folds fuse, partitioning the thorax and two partially formed pleural cavities.

Bottom Line: To date, few short case reports, primarily from the pre-CT and MR era, describe congenital absence of the right pericardium.We present a more comprehensive discussion of the embryologic derangements causing such defects and offer an up-to-date review of characteristic radiologic findings.Recognition of characteristic imaging findings of congenital pericardial absence is crucial in guiding diagnosis and management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States.

ABSTRACT
Though congenital pericardial absence is often asymptomatic, complications can be life threatening. To date, few short case reports, primarily from the pre-CT and MR era, describe congenital absence of the right pericardium. We present a more comprehensive discussion of the embryologic derangements causing such defects and offer an up-to-date review of characteristic radiologic findings. Recognition of characteristic imaging findings of congenital pericardial absence is crucial in guiding diagnosis and management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus