Limits...
Toxoplasma gondii in livestock in St. Kitts and Nevis, West Indies.

Hamilton CM, Kelly PJ, Bartley PM, Burrells A, Porco A, Metzler D, Crouch K, Ketzis JK, Innes EA, Katzer F - Parasit Vectors (2015)

Bottom Line: There was a significant positive correlation between serology and meat juice results.Preliminary PCR-RFLP analysis identified a predominance of the Type III genotype of T. gondii.These results suggest widespread environmental contamination with T. gondii oocysts and that livestock could be a potentially important source of T. gondii infection if their infected meat is consumed (or handled) undercooked.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Moredun Research Institute, Pentlands Science Park, Bush Loan, Edinburgh, EH26 0PZ, UK. Clare.Hamilton@moredun.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous protozoan parasite capable of infecting all warm-blooded animals including livestock. In these animals, the parasite forms cysts in the tissues which may pose a risk to public health if infected meat is consumed undercooked or raw. The aim of this study was to determine the exposure of livestock to T. gondii in St. Kitts and Nevis.

Methods: Sera and/or heart tissue and meat juice were collected from pigs (n = 124), sheep (n = 116) and goats (n = 66) at the St. Kitts Abattoir. Sera and meat juice were screened for reactive antibodies to T. gondii using an in-house ELISA. Heart tissue was screened for T. gondii DNA using quantitative PCR and positive samples were genotyped using RFLP.

Results: Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in sera from 48% of pigs, 26% of sheep and 34% of goats tested. Antibodies were also detected in the meat juice from 55% of pig hearts, 22% of sheep hearts and 31% of goat hearts tested. There was a significant positive correlation between serology and meat juice results. T. gondii DNA was detected in heart tissue of 21% of pigs, 16% of sheep and 23% of goats tested. Preliminary PCR-RFLP analysis identified a predominance of the Type III genotype of T. gondii.

Conclusions: These results suggest widespread environmental contamination with T. gondii oocysts and that livestock could be a potentially important source of T. gondii infection if their infected meat is consumed (or handled) undercooked.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Seroprevalence ofToxoplasma gondiiin livestock in St. Kitts and Nevis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374192&req=5

Fig1: Seroprevalence ofToxoplasma gondiiin livestock in St. Kitts and Nevis.

Mentions: Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in 48% (95% confidence interval (CI): 38-57%) of pig sera (49/103), 26% (CI: 18-35%) of sheep sera (27/105) and 34% (CI: 24-47%) of goat sera (22/64) tested by ELISA (Figure 1). Meat juice was also screened for T. gondii antibodies to determine its potential as an alternative test sample to sera. Antibodies were detected in 55% (CI: 47-65%) of pig meat juice samples (60/109), 22% (CI: 14-33%) of sheep meat juice samples (17/76) and 31% (CI: 21-44%) of goat meat juice samples (20/64) tested by ELISA (Figure 1). For 215 animals (88 pigs, 65 sheep and 62 goats), there was both a serum ELISA result and a meat juice ELISA result. For these samples, Lin’s concordance correlation indicated a significant positive association between serum ELISA ODs and meat juice ELISA ODs (rho_c = 0.899, P < 0.001).Figure 1


Toxoplasma gondii in livestock in St. Kitts and Nevis, West Indies.

Hamilton CM, Kelly PJ, Bartley PM, Burrells A, Porco A, Metzler D, Crouch K, Ketzis JK, Innes EA, Katzer F - Parasit Vectors (2015)

Seroprevalence ofToxoplasma gondiiin livestock in St. Kitts and Nevis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374192&req=5

Fig1: Seroprevalence ofToxoplasma gondiiin livestock in St. Kitts and Nevis.
Mentions: Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in 48% (95% confidence interval (CI): 38-57%) of pig sera (49/103), 26% (CI: 18-35%) of sheep sera (27/105) and 34% (CI: 24-47%) of goat sera (22/64) tested by ELISA (Figure 1). Meat juice was also screened for T. gondii antibodies to determine its potential as an alternative test sample to sera. Antibodies were detected in 55% (CI: 47-65%) of pig meat juice samples (60/109), 22% (CI: 14-33%) of sheep meat juice samples (17/76) and 31% (CI: 21-44%) of goat meat juice samples (20/64) tested by ELISA (Figure 1). For 215 animals (88 pigs, 65 sheep and 62 goats), there was both a serum ELISA result and a meat juice ELISA result. For these samples, Lin’s concordance correlation indicated a significant positive association between serum ELISA ODs and meat juice ELISA ODs (rho_c = 0.899, P < 0.001).Figure 1

Bottom Line: There was a significant positive correlation between serology and meat juice results.Preliminary PCR-RFLP analysis identified a predominance of the Type III genotype of T. gondii.These results suggest widespread environmental contamination with T. gondii oocysts and that livestock could be a potentially important source of T. gondii infection if their infected meat is consumed (or handled) undercooked.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Moredun Research Institute, Pentlands Science Park, Bush Loan, Edinburgh, EH26 0PZ, UK. Clare.Hamilton@moredun.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous protozoan parasite capable of infecting all warm-blooded animals including livestock. In these animals, the parasite forms cysts in the tissues which may pose a risk to public health if infected meat is consumed undercooked or raw. The aim of this study was to determine the exposure of livestock to T. gondii in St. Kitts and Nevis.

Methods: Sera and/or heart tissue and meat juice were collected from pigs (n = 124), sheep (n = 116) and goats (n = 66) at the St. Kitts Abattoir. Sera and meat juice were screened for reactive antibodies to T. gondii using an in-house ELISA. Heart tissue was screened for T. gondii DNA using quantitative PCR and positive samples were genotyped using RFLP.

Results: Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in sera from 48% of pigs, 26% of sheep and 34% of goats tested. Antibodies were also detected in the meat juice from 55% of pig hearts, 22% of sheep hearts and 31% of goat hearts tested. There was a significant positive correlation between serology and meat juice results. T. gondii DNA was detected in heart tissue of 21% of pigs, 16% of sheep and 23% of goats tested. Preliminary PCR-RFLP analysis identified a predominance of the Type III genotype of T. gondii.

Conclusions: These results suggest widespread environmental contamination with T. gondii oocysts and that livestock could be a potentially important source of T. gondii infection if their infected meat is consumed (or handled) undercooked.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus