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Unravelling the hidden ancestry of American admixed populations.

Montinaro F, Busby GB, Pascali VL, Myers S, Hellenthal G, Capelli C - Nat Commun (2015)

Bottom Line: The movement of people into the Americas has brought different populations into contact, and contemporary American genomes are the product of a range of complex admixture events.Here we apply a haplotype-based ancestry identification approach to a large set of genome-wide SNP data from a variety of American, European and African populations to determine the contributions of different ancestral populations to the Americas.Our results provide a fine-scale characterization of the source populations, identify a series of novel, previously unreported contributions from Africa and Europe and highlight geohistorical structure in the ancestry of American admixed populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Institute of Legal Medicine, Catholic University, Largo F. Vito 1, Rome 00168, Italy [2] Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK.

ABSTRACT
The movement of people into the Americas has brought different populations into contact, and contemporary American genomes are the product of a range of complex admixture events. Here we apply a haplotype-based ancestry identification approach to a large set of genome-wide SNP data from a variety of American, European and African populations to determine the contributions of different ancestral populations to the Americas. Our results provide a fine-scale characterization of the source populations, identify a series of novel, previously unreported contributions from Africa and Europe and highlight geohistorical structure in the ancestry of American admixed populations.

No MeSH data available.


Approximate geographic sampling location of donor and recipient populations analysed.Colours refer to the 13 groups as described in Fig. 2 and Supplementary Table 2. Circles and diamond refer, respectively, to donors and recipients.
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f1: Approximate geographic sampling location of donor and recipient populations analysed.Colours refer to the 13 groups as described in Fig. 2 and Supplementary Table 2. Circles and diamond refer, respectively, to donors and recipients.

Mentions: In order to obtain a finer characterization of the ancestry landscape of admixed American populations, we implemented a novel inference method that reconstructs local genomic ancestry using a haplotype-based approach67. It has been shown in previous investigations678 that approaches based on haplotypes allow for a finer reconstruction of genetic structure when compared with classical approaches that directly employ single-marker genotypes, and that they are characterized by a lower degree of bias due to the ascertainment process of the polymorphisms studied9. We applied this methodology to genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) data from more than 2,500 individuals collected from various putatively admixed American and Caribbean populations. We compared the DNA of these ‘recipient’ groups to that of a cross-section of world-wide ‘donor’ populations that act as surrogates for the true ancestral source groups (Fig. 1, Supplementary Table 1), generating a detailed description of the genomic contribution of these groups to admixed American populations.


Unravelling the hidden ancestry of American admixed populations.

Montinaro F, Busby GB, Pascali VL, Myers S, Hellenthal G, Capelli C - Nat Commun (2015)

Approximate geographic sampling location of donor and recipient populations analysed.Colours refer to the 13 groups as described in Fig. 2 and Supplementary Table 2. Circles and diamond refer, respectively, to donors and recipients.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374169&req=5

f1: Approximate geographic sampling location of donor and recipient populations analysed.Colours refer to the 13 groups as described in Fig. 2 and Supplementary Table 2. Circles and diamond refer, respectively, to donors and recipients.
Mentions: In order to obtain a finer characterization of the ancestry landscape of admixed American populations, we implemented a novel inference method that reconstructs local genomic ancestry using a haplotype-based approach67. It has been shown in previous investigations678 that approaches based on haplotypes allow for a finer reconstruction of genetic structure when compared with classical approaches that directly employ single-marker genotypes, and that they are characterized by a lower degree of bias due to the ascertainment process of the polymorphisms studied9. We applied this methodology to genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) data from more than 2,500 individuals collected from various putatively admixed American and Caribbean populations. We compared the DNA of these ‘recipient’ groups to that of a cross-section of world-wide ‘donor’ populations that act as surrogates for the true ancestral source groups (Fig. 1, Supplementary Table 1), generating a detailed description of the genomic contribution of these groups to admixed American populations.

Bottom Line: The movement of people into the Americas has brought different populations into contact, and contemporary American genomes are the product of a range of complex admixture events.Here we apply a haplotype-based ancestry identification approach to a large set of genome-wide SNP data from a variety of American, European and African populations to determine the contributions of different ancestral populations to the Americas.Our results provide a fine-scale characterization of the source populations, identify a series of novel, previously unreported contributions from Africa and Europe and highlight geohistorical structure in the ancestry of American admixed populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Institute of Legal Medicine, Catholic University, Largo F. Vito 1, Rome 00168, Italy [2] Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK.

ABSTRACT
The movement of people into the Americas has brought different populations into contact, and contemporary American genomes are the product of a range of complex admixture events. Here we apply a haplotype-based ancestry identification approach to a large set of genome-wide SNP data from a variety of American, European and African populations to determine the contributions of different ancestral populations to the Americas. Our results provide a fine-scale characterization of the source populations, identify a series of novel, previously unreported contributions from Africa and Europe and highlight geohistorical structure in the ancestry of American admixed populations.

No MeSH data available.