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Spread of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Myanmar: a cross-sectional survey of the K13 molecular marker.

Tun KM, Imwong M, Lwin KM, Win AA, Hlaing TM, Hlaing T, Lin K, Kyaw MP, Plewes K, Faiz MA, Dhorda M, Cheah PY, Pukrittayakamee S, Ashley EA, Anderson TJ, Nair S, McDew-White M, Flegg JA, Grist EP, Guerin P, Maude RJ, Smithuis F, Dondorp AM, Day NP, Nosten F, White NJ, Woodrow CJ - Lancet Infect Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: Artemisinin resistance extends across much of Myanmar.Appropriate therapeutic regimens should be tested urgently and implemented comprehensively if spread of artemisinin resistance to other regions is to be avoided.Wellcome Trust-Mahidol University-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Programme and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Myanmar Oxford Clinical Research Unit, Yangon, Myanmar; Defence Services Medical Research Centre, Naypyitaw, Myanmar.

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Primary aminoacid positions of K13 mutations identified in Myanmar and border regions
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fig2: Primary aminoacid positions of K13 mutations identified in Myanmar and border regions

Mentions: We identified 29 different mutations after aminoacid 210, of which 26 (90%) were after aminoacid 440 (appendix). 371 (39%) isolates had a propeller-domain mutation (table). Consistent with previous reports,4,5 these mutations were concentrated within propeller blades 1–4 (figure 2). 17 isolates had an E252Q mutation in the so-called stem section of the K13 protein; one (2%) from Bago Region, 11 (4%) from Kayin State, and five (3%) from Tak Province. No sample had more than one mutation in these conserved domains of the protein.


Spread of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Myanmar: a cross-sectional survey of the K13 molecular marker.

Tun KM, Imwong M, Lwin KM, Win AA, Hlaing TM, Hlaing T, Lin K, Kyaw MP, Plewes K, Faiz MA, Dhorda M, Cheah PY, Pukrittayakamee S, Ashley EA, Anderson TJ, Nair S, McDew-White M, Flegg JA, Grist EP, Guerin P, Maude RJ, Smithuis F, Dondorp AM, Day NP, Nosten F, White NJ, Woodrow CJ - Lancet Infect Dis (2015)

Primary aminoacid positions of K13 mutations identified in Myanmar and border regions
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374103&req=5

fig2: Primary aminoacid positions of K13 mutations identified in Myanmar and border regions
Mentions: We identified 29 different mutations after aminoacid 210, of which 26 (90%) were after aminoacid 440 (appendix). 371 (39%) isolates had a propeller-domain mutation (table). Consistent with previous reports,4,5 these mutations were concentrated within propeller blades 1–4 (figure 2). 17 isolates had an E252Q mutation in the so-called stem section of the K13 protein; one (2%) from Bago Region, 11 (4%) from Kayin State, and five (3%) from Tak Province. No sample had more than one mutation in these conserved domains of the protein.

Bottom Line: Artemisinin resistance extends across much of Myanmar.Appropriate therapeutic regimens should be tested urgently and implemented comprehensively if spread of artemisinin resistance to other regions is to be avoided.Wellcome Trust-Mahidol University-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Programme and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Myanmar Oxford Clinical Research Unit, Yangon, Myanmar; Defence Services Medical Research Centre, Naypyitaw, Myanmar.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus